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  1. #1

    Default Will running a baler ruin my tractor?

    I tried running my IH 37 baler on my kubota L2550 (28 pto /30 engine hp) and it baled fine, I really couldn't notice any load on the engine, not even as much as running the backhoe, but I am worried that the constant load/no load on the pto. will wear something out, that baler is a very small model and is in good smooth operating condition so it has a small power requirement, the tractor pulls and stops it easilly, and it doesn't throw the tractor around, all I am concerned about is the pto. what is the weakest link in the pto? In other words, what will break or wear out first if something is going to go? I have a Farmall M that I could use, but it doesn't have brakes or live pto, which is a nuisance. Thanks for your help and opinions, Chris

  2. #2
    Veteran Member gerard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    1,681
    Location
    Syracuse NY
    Tractor
    Kubota L2500DT w/FEL

    Default Re: Will running a baler ruin my tractor?

    Your weakest point in the PTO SHOULD be the shear bolt which costs about $.20 and is what's supposed to go if you put too much load on the PTO. I'm surprised the baler runs as well as you describe. Usual minimum HP for a baler is around 40-45. 50-55 if you add a kicker. Maybe yours is a mini baler? Have you checked with the baler manufacturer and see what they reccomend as a minimum HP requirement?

  3. #3
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    1,055
    Location
    WVa
    Tractor
    Kubota L3710, Ford 5600, Case MB4/94, Kubota B6200

    Default Re: Will running a baler ruin my tractor?

    I run a NH 311 with a 30 pto hp L series kubota with no problem. The baler is a regular sized square baler. Using the Kubota which is smaller than my Ford makes maneuvering in irregular spaces easier. Even though the Ford has twice the power of the Kubota, I'm probably going to sell it.

    If you do overload the tractor, it will just stall the engine. You're not going to damage anything unless you transmit a severe shock load to the pto. Doesn't your baler have a slip clutch at the end of the drive shaft near the gear case? That should prevent any shocks to the drive line.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Will running a baler ruin my tractor?

    Most balers have a flywheel incorporated in the drivetrain to even out the little bumps in the pto load as the various mechinisms do their thing. Unless you see the driveline jumping around or notice heavy load fluctuations on the engine I don't think you have anything to worry about. I recommend keeping the rpms up to maintain 540 on the pto which is where the baler was intended to operate at.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    2,518
    Location
    Capital District, Upstate New York
    Tractor
    Satoh S650G, MF135, MF165, JD5205

    Default Re: Will running a baler ruin my tractor?

    If a tractor encounters a severe/abrupt PTO load, the first thing that happens will be the engine rpms start dropping (this is where your engine torque curve comes into play), the more torque you have, the less the rpms drop, if the load is severe enough and the operator does nothing… then the engine will stall and go to “0” rpm. Usually it’s up to the operator to disengage the PTO prior to this point. If the load dissipates, then the engine rpm will increase as normal…Usually on balers, you will have multiple shear pins to prevent damage to the implement if it jams up… but you also have to “read” the sounds of the baler and know when to disengage the PTO… to correct any problems…

    Normally, it’s not the PTO hp problem of running a baler… it’s a weight factor of towing a combined running baler and hay wagon… on a slight incline or side hilling you open yourself up for a very dangerous uncontrollable situation… “when the tail starts wagging the dog…”

    Your average baler will weigh say between 3300-3800 lbs and the average 50-60 PTO hp tractor will weigh ~5000-7000 lbs… you can get into trouble rather quickly when the “tow vehicle” weighs less than the unit being towed… it’s a simple law of physics… [img]/w3tcompact/icons/wink.gif[/img]

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