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  1. #1

    Default Self filling of tires with washer fluid practical?

    HI,

    I saw windshield washer fluid on sale at a place that is going out of business, looks cheap at 80 cents per gallon.

    How hard is it to fill one's own tires? I am getting a kubota B2910. Any idea how much ww fluid I need to do two rear tires? I know I saw a table listing this info somewhere...perhaps in the faq. I will check...

    Should I or shouldn't I? Is a pump needed or will gravity work?

    Anyone only fill tires up to the axle to maximize the downward shift of the center of gravity? Would doing so be a bad Idea? I probably would not do this, but...

    All input greatly appreciated!!!

  2. #2
    Super Star Member RoyJackson's Avatar
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    John Deere 4400 MFWD, Deere 855D UTV and assorted implements

    Default Re: Self filling of tires with washer fluid practical?

    Click on this <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.tractorbynet.com/cgi-bin/compact/showflat.pl?Cat=&amp;Board=genoperating&amp;Number =134657&amp;page=&amp;view=&amp;sb=&amp;o=&amp;vc= 1>thread</A>. I think it'll help you out.
    Loading your tires isn't that much...you'll have to purchase a few items (explained in the thread).

  3. #3

    Default Re: Self filling of tires with washer fluid practical?

    Hi Roy and everyone,

    Thanks for the reference to that thread. I remember reading it in the past...part numbers very helpful.

    Will gravity work easily. Or is some pressure needed to get the liquid into the tire in a reasonable time frame?

    Thanks for the help!

    Bill

  4. #4
    Platinum Member Steelfan's Avatar
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    Central PA
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    New Holland TC21D

    Default Re: Self filling of tires with washer fluid practical?

    Macher, I did the rear tires on my TC21D. With the help of my cousin, who is a tire man, I put 15 gallons of fluid in each tire. We let the air out of the tire, and broke the bead on one side. After that we just poured the fluid a place where we put a gap between the tire, and wheel. It acted like a funnel. We then put air back in the tire, and put it back on the tractor. The job was done, and cost me about $25-$27, and about an hour returning the favor to my cousin. One thing you need to be careful of is that you have an air compressor that has enough pressure to reset the bead on the wheel. It takes some decent air pressure. Also the wheels will be pretty heavy, when you're done. You will probably need help putting them on. Good Luck. I hope this helps you. Kent

  5. #5

    Default Re: Self filling of tires with washer fluid practical?

    Steelfan,

    That is an interesting approach! But well beyond my capabilities. Only have a small air compressor...I would be afraid to undertake the bead breaking, as I just KNOW where it would lead me! Don't want to go there...:-)

    Thanks for the alternative idea!

    Bill

  6. #6
    Super Star Member
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    Default Re: Self filling of tires with washer fluid practical?

    I would agree with Steelfan's procedure as being quite easy, with the help of extra hands. One addition that helped me set the bead, was to place blocking under the rim when laying the tire down before letting the air out for filling (hold the rim high so the downside of the tire drooped allowing the topside bead to open for filling and to keep the lower bead from breaking loose). Then after filling the tire, remove the center blocking and allow the steel rim to drop, closing up the topside bead for filling with air. A bit of lifting on the tire where the air would escape was all that was needed on my R-4's to seat the bead.
    I put in about 30 gal. in each rear tire.

  7. #7
    Super Star Member RoyJackson's Avatar
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    Default Re: Self filling of tires with washer fluid practical?

    "Will gravity work easily. Or is some pressure needed to get the liquid into the tire in a reasonable time frame?"

    I picked up a small drill powered pump for about 6 dollars. It worked quite well, but it is a bit slow. I got it at Wal-Mart I believe.

  8. #8
    Gold Member
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    May 2002
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    Pgh, PA
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    Cub Cadet 7360SS & MF1100

    Default Re: Self filling of tires with washer fluid practical?

    I've been wanting to do my own. My only problem has been finding a place who sells the fluid in bulk. Even if the fluid is on sale, buying that many gallon jugs just does not seem practical, or economical! Any ideas? Thanks.

  9. #9
    Super Star Member
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    Default Re: Self filling of tires with washer fluid practical?

    Around here, the price by the gallon is cheaper than the price per gallon in 55 gallon drums. Go figure. Your conclusion should be right, but I learned differently while checking into this a month ago. Check out a NAPA store or other auto parts supply store.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
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    Fort Kent, Maine
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    B6100D Kubota

    Default Re: Self filling of tires with washer fluid practical?

    I went down to the local car dealers, asked them if they could save the old anti-freeze they drain from cars. Then used my submersible sump pump with adapters to fit a short lenght of garden hose then an adapter to fit the tire. This adapter has a bleeder valve on it.

    First, block the rear axel, to keep the weight off the tire. Then I hit the bleeder to remove some air, then plugged in the pump and started filling the tires. Every once in a while, you need to bleed off some more air. you can tell when they're filled when air doesn't come out, only liquid. Then top it off with the correct air pressure.

    With the valves on top, you get as much liquid in a tire as possible. The rust inhibitors in the anti freeze keep the rust off the rim. And you can do this with the tire left on the tractor. Filled many tires for friends and family using this technique.

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