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  1. #11
    Veteran Member
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    Jul 2002
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    1,598
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    Greene Co, Arkansas
    Tractor
    JD 1050 2wd, Case 580D 2wd

    Default Re: Shuttle shift

    I'll give it a shot
    A shuttle type trans. has a method of going from forward to reverse quickly for "shuttling" back and forth such as in loader work.
    There are a two types of shuttle trans. in compact tractors these days:
    1. A gear type where a forward gear (usually 1-2) is aligned with reverse in the shift pattern or they may have a seperate lever for this function. To use these one still has to clutch but the time spent shifting is reduced.
    2. A hydraulic type that engages the clutch automatically without the driver having to. Again, time spent shifting is reduced.
    Now, a hydrostatic trans consists of two hydraulic motors that drive the wheels. These are controled usually by foot pedal(s) on the floor. The more one pushes down on the pedal, the faster one goes. They usually have a button or lever that will hold the speed like cruise control in a car so one's feet do not get tired.

    I cannot tell you what you must have, but if I was buying, I would spring for a differential lock, (locks rear tires so they pull together) 4wd for obvious resons, and a front loader. Loaders have 1001 uses as you'll find out. Rear attachments are a matter of need and want.

  2. #12
    Platinum Member Trev's Avatar
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    913
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    Williamson, NY (near Rochester)
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    Currently tractor-less

    Default Re: Shuttle shift

    Road,

    This got kind of confusing, due in no small part to my input. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/blush.gif[/img]

    Did you get you question answered to your satisfaction?

    Bob

  3. #13
    Veteran Member hayden's Avatar
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    Sep 2000
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    1,709
    Location
    MA/VT
    Tractor
    Kubota L5740 cab + FEL, Cat D5G dozer, Kubota KX121 excavtor

    Default Re: Shuttle shift

    How well does the forward/reverse work on an incline? Does the transition through neutral give the tractor a chance to roll? Also, I assume when the go to neutral the tractor is free to roll?

    One thing I like about hydrostatics, especially on hilly terrain, is the breaking action of the transmission when in "neutral".

    I need to go try one of the full hydraulic, no-clutch gear transmissions to see what it's like. I've never tried one. Maybe I could get over my need for a hydro.

  4. #14
    Super Member
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    Dec 2000
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    6,737
    Tractor
    JD 8320 MFWD, JD 6415 MFWD, FEL, and cab, John Deere MFWD 4600, John Deere 4020, John Deere 4430, John Deere 455 mower, Deutz, and Gehl 4610 perkins skidsteer

    Default Re: Shuttle shift

    Hayden,
    That's where you can either use the clutch and go to reverse or you can go to neutral and right into reverse. You will have a slight free roll until the clutch plates lock but I've had balers on the back of my tractors and it's never pushed me very far at all even on an incline. Square or round baling it just doesn't get any better than the powershift. You can control everything just with your hands. Set the pto speed and then select your baling gear. I really like it because if I need a person to come over to bale while I stack on the wagon I can just put them in a low enough gear that I can keep up and all they have to do is just keep the windrow between the wheels. Something yesterday that was extremely nice on my 4600 was I had to put screws and tin up all the way around a 15x45 lean-to I was putting up. I put my daughter on and all she had to do was use the power reverser and the brake. Advantages to all types of transmissions no doubt.

  5. #15
    Veteran Member
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    May 2000
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    1,125
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    Escaped to The Algoma

    Default Re: Shuttle shift

    Cowboy Doc,

    I beg to differ with you on what exactly a Shuttle Shift is.

    As Scott has pointed out correctly what it is and how it works.

    The inline direction change was invented in the late 50s for ag-tractors by an engineer by the name of Mac Roberts working for Ford Tractor Operations. He installed it on a Ford 800,on the right side of the cowling just to the side and front of the steering wheel.(by the way this tractor still exists as far as I know at the D-A Boy Scout Camp of the Detroit Area Council) This was a loader tractor that I spent many hours on in my teen years working at the camp. Mac also helped out there after his retirement.

    Shuttles can be mechanical,electronic,hydraulic. Floor mounted,column mounted,push button,etc..... But they all do one thing,allow for direction changes in one motion.

  6. #16
    Super Member
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    6,737
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    JD 8320 MFWD, JD 6415 MFWD, FEL, and cab, John Deere MFWD 4600, John Deere 4020, John Deere 4430, John Deere 455 mower, Deutz, and Gehl 4610 perkins skidsteer

    Default Re: Shuttle shift

    What do you call a powershift then?

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    280
    Location
    Western N.C. from New Orleans.
    Tractor
    MF 220 - Long 2360- Kioti 3054

    Default Re: Shuttle shift

    Short explaination copied from the internet. I don't know how long ago this was written, but here it is.....

    <font color=blue>Shuttle shift transmissions have been used for many years on tractor loaders. These may be mechanical or hydraulic. Mechanical shuttles require using the clutch to change direction, but they are synchronized. Hydraulic shuttles can be shifted with out using the clutch. Either way, these transmissions allow the operator to change directions with out stopping. They allow for similar speeds in forward and reverse and increase productivity with a loader.

    kubota has taken the shuttle shift to a new level with the Glide Shift Transmission (GST). The GST allows the operator to shift up and down through all 8 speeds with out clutching and to shift from forward to reverse with out stopping or clutching. This is a mechanical transmission with an automatic clutch. The Glide Shift provides some of the benefits of the hydrostatic and some of the benefits of a gear transmission.

    Hydrostatic transmissions are becoming a popular choice for compact tractors. The foot pedal(s) allows the operator to run the loader and three-point hitch with the right hand, steer with the left hand and control speed and direction with his foot. This method of operation is faster and less fatiguing than having to shift with one or both hands, clutch with the left leg and run all the other controls. This transmission is similar in operation to an automatic transmission in car. You can change speed and drink a cup of coffee. </font color=blue>

  8. #18
    Super Member
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    Dec 2000
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    6,737
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    JD 8320 MFWD, JD 6415 MFWD, FEL, and cab, John Deere MFWD 4600, John Deere 4020, John Deere 4430, John Deere 455 mower, Deutz, and Gehl 4610 perkins skidsteer

    Default Re: Shuttle shift

    May be all talking about the same thing then. kubota, however, didn't start the glideshift. John Deere has had a glideshift, powershift, etc., whatever you want to call it, since the early 60's.

  9. #19
    Platinum Member Trev's Avatar
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    Williamson, NY (near Rochester)
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    Currently tractor-less

    Default Re: Shuttle shift

    BTW, I was wrong about what Deere calls my lever.. the manual refers to it as the "reverser lever." This is on the SyncReverser model. I understand they also have a "PowerReverser" model which allows you to use the reverser lever without the clutch. I suspect a lot of sloppiness has crept into the language as a result of manufacturers searching for a copyrightable name for their various features.

    Bob

  10. #20
    Veteran Member
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    Greene Co, Arkansas
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    JD 1050 2wd, Case 580D 2wd

    Default Re: Shuttle shift

    Trev, I suspect you are right.
    A true powershift can shift not only from forward to reverse but also into any gear in that range. For example, doing tillage work, The soil conditions change, needing a lower gear. The operator will just bump the shifter from say 4th down to 3rd. An observer on the ground will hear the engine rpm blip and then return to load.
    These are very common on larger Ag tractors and earthmoving equipment. The Ag tractors usually use some type of hydraulic clutch while bulldozers and the like usually use a torque convertor. HTH

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