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  1. #221
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    1,894
    Location
    S. W. Virginia
    Tractor
    Kubota B3200, Ford NAA, IH 454D, Case 1845C

    Default Re: Logistics of firewood hauling and splitting?

    Thanks for everyone's pics and vids, they give me some good ideas.

    The pics I posted last were at out wood lot at the old farm. It has great mature trees and about 150ac of them, but it is 65mi away so I'm beginning to question the viability of hauling all the wood up here. I've started cutting at another one of our farms that is only two miles from mine. It's got about 60-80ac of woods, but it was clear cut about 15-20yrs ago so the trees aren't great. The things that are big enough for firewood are mostly red maple, some beech, and a few locust and cherry. The access is a bit easier than the old farm though, plenty of good logging roads. I still have about 3 cords to finish cutting before the end of the winter so I'll post some pics as I do.
    Kubota B3200
    Ford NAA Jubilee
    International 454D
    Case 1845C skid steer
    JD 265

  2. #222
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    1,894
    Location
    S. W. Virginia
    Tractor
    Kubota B3200, Ford NAA, IH 454D, Case 1845C

    Default Re: Logistics of firewood hauling and splitting?

    Thought I'd bring this thread back up since it seems to be of interest to a lot of folks. I've finally come up with a good way to get wood to the landing without making a mess of the trails and dirtying the wood. I had an old derelict portable chicken coop that someone had built on a wagon running gear. I tore the chicken coop off, got it down to the bare running gear and refurbished it into a log wagon. It's not pretty, but I have a total of $15.68 invested in it and it seems to do the job quite well. Later I'll make some little log standards out of metal, but so far the wooden ones are holding fine.

    -p1020135-jpg
    -p1020134-jpg
    -p1020136-jpg

    We were averaging about one wagon load like that per hour which I thought was pretty good. I believe one of those loads cut and split would equal a pickup load. This setup works well as we can use the tractor for skidding, loading, hauling and unloading, as well as carry small stuff out on the forks. I have to be careful though, that load of locust was pretty heavy and it was trying to push me down some of the muddy hills.

    From here we have to get all this wood (hopefully about 15 wagon loads) back to our other farm which is 60mi away. We'll either haul the logs back or cut/split and haul the wood back, haven't decided yet. Either way we'll use one of our 2-ton dump trucks for the hauling.

    I'm sure there are plenty of new ideas out there this year so pics and input is always welcome.
    Kubota B3200
    Ford NAA Jubilee
    International 454D
    Case 1845C skid steer
    JD 265

  3. #223
    Veteran Member SpringHollow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    1,710
    Location
    South of Rochester, NY
    Tractor
    Power Trac 1850, NH 2120

    Default Re: Logistics of firewood hauling and splitting?

    I do the same with an 8' hay wagon that I use with stakes for logs or full sides for cut wood. Anything bigger would be too much on the steep hills with muddy trails.

    Ken
    PT1850, mini hoe, grapple, stump grinder, brush hog

    http://www.usadiscountgenerators.com...T1850Home.html

  4. #224
    Platinum Member Green Power's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    568
    Location
    Nebraska
    Tractor
    John Deere: 750, 2305, 2010, 1020, 4020, 3020 4200, 4430, 4630, 4850, 8520, 9200, 6150M, and 5075E Kubota: B3030, and L3400 Case IH: MX270, and STX 375 LS: R4047H Ford: 8N

    Default Re: Logistics of firewood hauling and splitting?

    For $15.68 that isnt a bad setup.

    From left to right. Kubota L3400 Kubota B3030 John Deere 4200 and John Deere 750

  5. #225

    Default Re: Logistics of firewood hauling and splitting?

    The idea is to reduce the amount of times you touch the wood. Example: 1) fell the tree, 2) remove slash, 3) cut to 8-10 foot links, 4) fork to staging area, 5) cut to burn length, 6) split and stack into 4x4x2 fruit bin, 7) fork bin to storage area, 8) fork to porch/deck, 9) cart into the house, 10) stoke the fire. That is about as minimal as I can get. Only way to reduce these touches as far as I can see is to cut, split and stack in bin where I drop the tree but that isn't possible in most of my terrain.

  6. #226
    New Member Woodsman7254's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    12
    Location
    Sandstone mn
    Tractor
    New Massey 1529 as of 2012

    Default Re: Logistics of firewood hauling and splitting?

    Thanks for the app--just stumbled upon this post as I am reading this thread.
    Thanks again!
    Woodsman

  7. #227
    Member Kodthree's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    39
    Location
    North Idaho
    Tractor
    2007 Kubota L3130

    Default Re: Logistics of firewood hauling and splitting?

    Quote Originally Posted by Verticaltrx View Post
    I've been burning wood for years and still have yet to come up with the best way to get it from the tree into my wood pile. Over the years I've tried innumerable different configurations for hauling and splitting, but still haven't decided whats the best, most efficient way. I burn about 5 cords a year and help my father cut about another 6 cords.

    Here's the equipment I use:

    -Ford NAA tractor
    -Kubota B3200 w/ loader
    -'69 F-350, 10' flat bed (2wd)
    -'88 F-250 (4wd)
    -4x6' trailer
    -(coming soon 5x10' trailer)
    -tow-behind wood splitter
    -logging arch for 3pt hitch (no winch)

    I've tried towing the splitter behind my little trailer, but can't haul very much on the trailer. Trucks are limited to where they can go as a lot of the terrain is steep and trails are tight. Also tried skidding the logs out to a landing to buck and split them, but that made a mess of the trails and covered the wood in dirt. Some of the best wood is in the very back of the farm and its about 1/2mi through narrow steep logging roads to get to it, so it takes a while to get much wood out.

    So based on this info what would be my best plan of action? What does everyone else use to split and haul out firewood? Pics would be great.

    Thanks in advance.
    Stage your work. Tractor, trailer, skidding, and cutting equipment go into the woods. Skid MINIMALLY, because dirty wood is hard on equipment...you already knew this. Load the blocks into your trailer and tractor bucket. Our trailer is a Chevy truck bed with stake racks pulled behind the L3130 and the ballast box. Drive the wood back to your splitting/stacking area. Split the wood out of the bucket and trailer and stack immediately instead of letting it hit the ground (or unload into a loose pile, and return for more rounds). This process works very well for us, and allows us to work in segments of work as short as two hours for the felling/bucking/loading/returning portion.
    It sounds to me like you are taking too much equipment into the wood lot which will significantly slow everything down. If you separate your processes as I have described, then can you can simply gather rounds as needed in the beginning of your season, and split when needed. Maybe you can cut/haul one weekend followed by a split/stack weekend?

    See my Avatar? That's how we USED to do it, and it sucks splitting from the ground back on to the ground to be picked up and moved yet another time. Learning happens.
    Last edited by Kodthree; 02-26-2014 at 02:49 PM. Reason: learning
    2007 Kubota L3130 HST with canopy, LA723 FEL, L sumthin/nother Kubota front-mounted blower, "built" JD ballast box, WM-8H chipper.

  8. #228
    New Member Woodsman7254's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    12
    Location
    Sandstone mn
    Tractor
    New Massey 1529 as of 2012

    Default Re: Logistics of firewood hauling and splitting?

    I use my Massey 1529 now for the last couple of years prior to that I had a great 52 Ford 8N. My hunting shack is on 40 acres and over the yrs this is how I prefer to make wood.
    I knock down some trees whenever I feel like it. Sometimes in the fall and winter or just when I am making firewood. Of course blowdowns can make up a good share of it as well. I hate working in the woods with the saw and stumbling around so when I knock down the trees I limb and top them and if necessary cut into 16 to 20 foot lengths. The reason for the lenghts is once sawed up at the wood shed I do not have to carry the pcs far to the splitter.
    It is nice to have a bunches of trees cut and limbed in the woods prior as then I can get my highball glass, hop on the tractor and just pull out logs for the afternoon.
    On the tractors three point I have a loghog which I purchased from Northern tool. Great little device I did not have with the Ford.
    I pull one or two logs at a time up to the wood shed on the mowed lawn where I can later saw them up into firewood. Generally only 2 or four logs at a time or 10 or 12 logs at the shed depending on how ambitious I feel. The side of the woodshed is open and faces south. Even on a 0 degree day it s warm working in the sun against the shed, warm enough I can be in a flannel shirt
    Sometimes on one week-end I will pull up the logs and process the next.
    Once up next to the wood shed I cut them up (and they are clean becasue I am lifting them up with the loghog as I pull them in.) then I proceed to split with my Troybilt 27 ton splitter with a Honda engine.
    Once I get a good jag split by the shed, Remember I am splitting right next to it so I do not even have to move my feet to pile or again I split everything and pile the next week-end. I don't make a lot of work out of it anymore. With the tractor, chainsaw and splitter it is not difficult. Some folks like to golf, I like to make wood. Most of the logs I work with are 12 to 20 inches
    It does not take long to make 5 cords if I get after it. I sweat enough in the cool weather so when the hot days of summer come I go fishing.

  9. #229
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    460
    Location
    Forfar, Ontario, Canada
    Tractor
    1947 Massey Harris 30, 1960 Massey Ferguson 35 (Perkins), 1995 TAFE 351DI, 1980 Bolens G174, 2005 Kubota B7510

    Default Re: Logistics of firewood hauling and splitting?

    I have tried a variety of tractor/trailer combinations to reduce the labour in moving a couple of cords per year from the woods to the floor of my shop, beside the stove.

    1. The most efficient is the cutting of dead, dry ironwood, piling it into the 10 cu.' dump box mounted on my Bolens G174, and backing it directly into the shop to the wood pile. This rig also moves dry wood from the outdoor pile into the shop. It needs only 44" of clearance, so I can back the 4WD tractor right up to almost any tree in the woodlot I choose to cut.

    2. Next best is loading block wood onto the bed of my new hydraulic dump trailer. The sides fold down on this narrow single axle. If I stand the blocks on end I can lower a side again and transfer them to the splitter bed with minimal lifting. When I had to use the Massey Harris 30 for hauling I found it awkward in the woods. The kubota B7510 or the Bolens G174 are very handy in tight spaces, though weaker.

    3. Moving split wood to the drying pile? Front end loader and snow/gravel bucket with my wife driving the tractor while I load the wood.

    4. A Massey 30 and 4X6' trailer is a powerful and durable woodlot performer as long as trails are wide. The Polaris Ranger delivers personnel and saws, but to my mind a UTV is too expensive and fragile for brute work like firewood hauling.

    5. My first (and least efficient) rig was a 5X10 single-axle manure spreader with the beaters removed, but with a new oak floor and working apron. It will move a lot of firewood, but it's awkward to load and tricky to unload efficiently unless there's a crew. It's great for planer shavings and topsoil, though.

    6. Massey Ferguson 35 with 8000lb skidding winch. When snow conditions are right, I bring logs and large branches to the landing with the skidder, then often lift them with the loader forks to facilitate cutting. The trick's to have no grit on the logs.

  10. #230
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    2,809
    Location
    Foster, RI
    Tractor
    Mahindra 3016

    Default Re: Logistics of firewood hauling and splitting?

    Basically Matt what you have here is a makeshift "forwarder". You can pile 7 or 8 stems (if it would hold that weight) and off you go. Your tractor would never be able to skid that much so it is a much more efficient method of bringing wood to the landing. The guys I worked for between the father, his brother and two sons, had a 110 years of experience between them at one point and they always brought stems to a landing first no matter what was going to be done with the wood. How they got there depended on the terrain, woods density and distance of turn. Almost always it was with skidders. Grit on logs was worried about as much as a pimple as a hand hatchet cleared the chain path. Plenty of times we could and should have used a forwarder but in no way could this operation afford a "new fangled machine". We did attempt to use a telephone pole dolly once but that was a disaster in these woods. Open and "the woods" mostly didn't correlate here in New England.

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