Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    83
    Location
    Ohio
    Tractor
    ford 3000,case SI..Just purchased a 404 Futon (40 hp 4wd) with a koyker FEL

    Default loaded vrs bolt on

    looking back through various posts,i never came across where filled rears were compared to bolt on weights?Any one care to comment?In my instances they are::::Ford air rears with bolt on weights,case:calicum with bolt on weights,IH...bolt on weights and calicum filled (I think)..Do all the compact 4x4`s offer optional weight kits? ..Sid

  2. #2

    Default Re: loaded vrs bolt on

    HI...

    OK...I'll start the response thread [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    Unless someone faster is typing at the moment [img]/w3tcompact/icons/blush.gif[/img]

    Fluid filled tires are filled to the top of the rim...so the center of gravity of the fluid is lower than the axle center...so fluid will be ever so slightly better in the prevention of a roll over when on a slope...IF one ignors the possibility of the fluid sloshing up and actually raising the center of gravity over what the equivelant sold wheel weight would offer.

    Pound per pound, fluid may be cheaper than solid wheel weights...

    Bill in pgh, PA

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    672
    Location
    Tupper Lake, NY
    Tractor
    Kubota B7500 HSD

    Default Re: loaded vrs bolt on

    Macher,
    Would you use fluid, weights or chains for snowblowing??
    -Terry

  4. #4

    Default Re: loaded vrs bolt on

    Hi,

    <font color=blue>Macher,
    Would you use fluid, weights or chains for snowblowing??
    -Terry </font color=blue>

    I don't know anything about snowblowing...but I think chains are a separate issue from the weight added by fluid or weights...

    My GUESS would be that chains would be the winner if there were a contest between the three...maybe someone who REALLY knows can answer though...

    I am myself wondering how my kubota B2910 will move in the snow this winter...it doesn't seem to do too well when I try cliimbing a grade next to the house in 2 wheel drive, even with loaded R4 tires. Switch to 4x4 and there is no problem...

    From what I have read here at tbn though, it seems that "chains rule" in the snow and ice, especially with ice.

    Bill in Pgh, PA

  5. #5
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    707
    Location
    Fairmont,WV
    Tractor
    New Holland Boomer2030

    Default Re: loaded vrs bolt on

    Tiltbed
    I can see advantages and disadvantages to both. I have my rears loaded with calcium and plan on getting the fronts done. The front on my TC18 is light without a FEL. I also have tubes in all four tires. Calcium rusts out the wheels. If I get a flat the fluid will drain out, that wouldn't happen with bolt on weights That seems to be my major concern. With them filled I don't have to worry about fighting them to get them on as you would with bolt ons.
    Solo

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    83
    Location
    Ohio
    Tractor
    ford 3000,case SI..Just purchased a 404 Futon (40 hp 4wd) with a koyker FEL

    Default Re: loaded vrs bolt on

    After my experances with calicum, they rather suck..Got a puncture on the Case...had to have the repair guy come out and fix it...pump out calicum...sand down rim,new tube install and re-fill...I think when the new lil guy arrives i will use bolt on weights and slime ...as this will be used primarly for brush hogging and planting the upper fields...Sid

  7. #7

    Default Re: loaded vrs bolt on

    Hi again,

    Forgot to mention...after my first front flat from glass...seems 50 years ago...there was no garbage pickup and making your own dump was the norm...I got my fronts filled with foam. $136 for the pair.

    The rears seem to be less likely to puncture. I personally decided to foam fill my rears if I got a puncture. Presently I have them filled with windshield wiper fluid.

    So far so good...the guy at the tire shop said that fronts are more likely to puncture, because especially with loader use, you are turning the tires with a lot of weight on them, and they sort of dig into whatever is down there to damage them.

    The rears just sort of float over whatever is there...normally.

    To date...so far so good at this end...

    Bill in Pgh, PA

  8. #8
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    762
    Location
    Greater Springfield area, Massachusetts
    Tractor
    Kubota B2910, also Honda HT3813 with mower and front blade.

    Default Re: loaded vrs bolt on

    tiltbed,

    I would chose chains first, then if that didn't quite do it I would fill the tires.

    I think this has been said before, but one of the differences between fluid and bolt-on weights is that when stopping, the enertial energy from the bolt-on weights must be absorbed by the tractor brakes. With fluid, I think a good part of the rotational enertial energy of the fluid is dissipated as the fluid sloshes around in the tires.

    I don't know if this addes significantly to the wear on the brakes over the life of the tractor, but it's something to think about.

    Personally, I'm hoping for lots of snow this winter to test out the chains I had bought for last winter which turned out to be a non-snow season in our part of the country.

    ~Rick





  9. #9

    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    433
    Location
    Canton, Texas
    Tractor
    Deere 5520 MFWD

    Default Re: loaded vrs bolt on

    Good point Rick, and I think that the same goes for accelerating as well. The rolling inertia of the tire / wheel combo is simply higher for the solid weights than it is for the liquid filled tires. I think that the real advantage of the steel weights is the ability to relatively easily remove them should the added weight be a detriment.

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