Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1

    Default starting out....

    Hi guys, I'm a 17 year old from Washington who works at a Nursery operating a 580b case backhoe. My boss owns another 580B extendahoe with a thumb and a fiat-allis wheel loader. I was just curious to know which is better to do when starting your own company. Buying smaller machines first or to get a big machine like a backhoe, trailer and dump truck (obviously)? It almost seems that some routes that people take is just as expensive in buying a backhoe, trailer etc. so I'd just like some input on what you have done and what you bought to start out with. Thanks.


    Blake Iverson
    WA

    P.S. I'm also curious to know what type of machines you have and what type of jobs is better to use that particular machine. If you're on the lawnsite.com website too, then you've already seen this so just ignore this post. Thanks.

  2. #2

    Default Re: starting out....

    I suspect that folks will be able to help you better if you describe the kind of work you want to do!

  3. #3

    Default Re: starting out....

    Jim, what a good idea! Well, I want to do rockeries, clearings, big and small, foundation digging (the stuff that requires an excavator I'm going to wait on as they are very expensive), any type of utilities work if I'm needed, site preps. etc. That sort of thing. I know that I want a 580C case extendahoe, then I'm hoping to put a thumb on it like my boss's husband did, and use that until I can buy more equipment. But I'm just not sure whether I should start out with smaller stuff, like a Kubota b21 or L35 or just go for saving up money to buy a dump truck (7 yrd. or something), trailer and my 580C.

    Blake
    WA

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    873
    Location
    N Central Ohio
    Tractor
    NH TC35D/SUPER H&M/F-20/JD B&D/FORDSON/JD250 SSL

    Default Re: starting out....

    I would start out w/ a SSL similar to my JD 250,
    I have a 9' Woods hoe, 4' trencher,forks,multiple
    buckets,tracks, an adapter to use 3 pt. equipment
    like my box blade or 8' landscape rake or the
    10.5' leveling blade.
    I'm looking at a HPD and a preperator for some
    extra work.
    If it wasn't for already working 10 hrs. a day,
    I could make $400.00 a day w/ an SSL.
    Yard work, utility lines, garage footers, septic work,
    driveways,prep for polebarns,landscaping,etc........
    U can pull it w/ p/u truck or small dump.

  5. #5
    Super Star Member Thomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    12,050
    Location
    Lebanon,NH.
    Tractor
    Kubota L2800HST w/Frontloader & CC LTX1046

    Default Re: starting out....

    Welcome to TBN Blake. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    There been alot posted on the topic your seeking..try search..at the top of the page,than set back w/cup coffee and read a way on some good info.

    Hows everything in KOG. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/wink.gif[/img]

  6. #6
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Posts
    1,720
    Location
    Columbia county NY
    Tractor
    87 Ingersoll 444, 84 Ingersoll224/'44 GreavlyL/60'sGreavlyL/49 Ford 8N

    Default Re: starting out....

    Can you work on your own stuff? If so I would try to find a used big loader/back hoe like the 580. They seem to run almost forever. As for the dump truck, same thing. I have seen some older[we are talking older, like late 70's] go for a good price. May need a little work, but easyer to work on then the newer stuff, and a LOT cheaper. Get a old dump, trailer, and loader/backhoe, and work it. See what you like, don't like about what you have. Save up some money. Upgrade your equment later, when you got the cash, and experance. Good luck, and get ready for some hard work.[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

  7. #7
    Super Member RobS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Posts
    6,234
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Tractor
    John Deere 790

    Default Re: starting out....

    Blake, I'm hardly an expert in small business (as I sit here in my coorporate cubicle surrounded by Dilbert paraphenalia) but it seems to me you're trying to base your new venture on equipment rather than on customers. In any business the customers are far more important than the equipment. Figure out what they want and what they'll pay for it. Good old fashioned supply and demand will tell you where the money is.

    My own observations around here are that foundation digging is probably not where the money is for a start up. Plenty of supply for that demand. Again, I haven't done the research but I would bet there is money to be made in low impact landscaping/small excavation. I could probably make something of a killing with a mini-excavator and some other small equipment putting in water gardens and such for the local rollers. Do it without disturbing a single blade of their pristine grass and they'll be calling back for more. Good luck with your ventures [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    2,518
    Location
    Capital District, Upstate New York
    Tractor
    Satoh S650G, MF135, MF165, JD5205

    Default Re: starting out....

    Great advice Robbie..! [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    Merely having some equipment, doesn’t give one an “instant” business…

    I’m sure a lot of guys have the best of intentions… but without a few years of hands-on experience and techniques under your belt… it could end up being a formula for disappointment or worse yet… disaster…

  9. #9
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    6,737
    Tractor
    JD 8320 MFWD, JD 6415 MFWD, FEL, and cab, John Deere MFWD 4600, John Deere 4020, John Deere 4430, John Deere 455 mower, Deutz, and Gehl 4610 perkins skidsteer

    Default Re: starting out....

    I would suggest at 17 you keep working for the guy you're with or move on to another company where you can run heavy equipment. Don't buy a new car, spend money on girls, etc, etc. Save your money and get some invaluable experience and business sense. I know you think you know it all at 17, heck I sure thought I did, but there is alot more to operating a business than buying equipment. Get three or four years under your belt and learn all the ins and outs of the industry. I don't mean to be harsh but if you have to ask what kind of equpment to buy you aren't ready yet to even think about starting. It's hard to make it on your own and with todays regulations and such you need to know your business. Get a good business and marketing plan. Know who your customer base is going to be and exactly what kind of work you are going to go after. Then buy the equipment to accomplish those goals and do that kind of work. As you get more work and things are going well then you can branch out into other areas of work and buy more machinery. Get your ducks in a row, some experinece under your belt, and you will go far. Best of luck to you.

  10. #10
    Elite Member hazmat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    4,015
    Location
    West Newbury, MA & Harrison, ME
    Tractor
    Kubota B3030 loaded!

    Default Re: starting out....

    <font color=blue>Well, I want to do rockeries, clearings, big and small, foundation digging (the stuff that requires an excavator I'm going to wait on as they are very expensive), any type of utilities work if I'm needed, site preps. etc. That sort of thing.</font color=blue>

    I'll echo what cowboydoc said. Go work for an excavation contractor for a couple years. Big difference digging a foundation hole vs. uprooting a tree. You'll get lots of experience without the expensive equipment loans, insurance etc.

    Do you have a Commercial drivers license? You'll need one to drive the big trucks &amp; tow a full size backhoe or excavator.

    Also, do you have any official training or certification on the backhoe? That plus your experience using one plus the CDL that you're going to get [img]/w3tcompact/icons/wink.gif[/img] should get you a job pretty fast.

    Last tid bit, I'm assuming that at 17 you are a senior in high school, make sure you graduate, more &amp; more employers want you to have that diploma. While you're working check out the local community college for some small business courses.

    Once you've got some experience, you can even work slowly into your own business by moonlighting. Alot of times you can rent equipment for a weekend and only have to pay for 1 day. This should allow you to do some smaller jobs that your new boss may not be interested in etc. Then you can slowly build up your customer base &amp; before you know it, you'll be ready to go on your own.

    Good luck &amp; If you're really dedicated you will make it happen.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2013 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.