Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 27
  1. #11
    Super Member
    Rest in Peace
    frank_f15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    6,033
    Location
    BUFFALO ,NEW YORK AREA
    Tractor
    kubota b2400- R4 tires

    Default Re: Gyro action -- an aid to hillside mowing?

    MIKE: welcome to the forum. as to your theory on the gyro effect of the mower, i ain't no expert on these things but i don't think it would have much of an effect, if its sliding, it ain;t safe. just my thoughts.[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

  2. #12
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Posts
    1,344
    Location
    West Virginia (Eastern Panhandle)
    Tractor
    '78 Kubota B6100DT

    Default Re: Gyro action -- an aid to hillside mowing?

    hazmat: Sorry 'bout that.
    The semester we encountered differential equations in college was the semester I switched from Engineering to Business!

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    1,211
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Tractor
    2001 New Holland TC40D w/16LA loader

    Default Re: Gyro action -- an aid to hillside mowing?

    The only gyroscopic effect I'm feeling is the one in my brain trying to solve the equation!!!![img]/w3tcompact/icons/clever.gif[/img]
    It makes my head spin[img]/w3tcompact/icons/shocked.gif[/img]!
    Mark

  4. #14
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    0

    Default Re: Gyro action -- an aid to hillside mowing?

    Danny, I really like your signature quote.

  5. #15
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    0

    Default Re: Gyro action -- an aid to hillside mowing?

    Mike,
    My major was a Math Minor, with Degree in Computer Engineering. In Differential Equations, I did learn about Gyroscopic Theory some, but only from theory, and not derivate applied format. From what i remember in Physics your assumption is somewhat limited by two other motions going on. Factor in the Engine rotating, the PTO rotating and the Ground wheels turning.

    Correct me if i'm wrong everyone, but my tractor engine turns one way, the pto the other, to counter rotate torque from the twist of the body frame. This is in my mind the gyro safety from more rollovers, since this works on the y axis of the tractor.

    Ex. like press your accelerator on the car, car motor, body twists to right.

    I personally believe your somewhat on the right track, but on in Low Gravity, Low G acceleration fields, given a proper weight to power ratio is given. I believe if we created some type of lower grav field you could test this... Interesting none the less.

    So with this in mind, is this feasible? Somewhat, a finish mower blades works on the x axis, so therefore its more of up down stability movement you will see, not side to side rollover movement like motor torque. Also given the weight of these machines, and power to weight, and no low gravity, the effects of any such effects are well, diminished.

    Ah, nothing like a little brain teaser! Good post!
    For those that took College Physics, life is so much more complicated now eh? [img]/w3tcompact/icons/grin.gif[/img]

    John

  6. #16
    Veteran Member chim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    2,253
    Location
    Lancaster County, PA
    Tractor
    Kubota L3200, Ford 1210

    Default Re: Gyro action -- an aid to hillside mowing?

    Mike, welcome aboard. I believe there's more benefit from the fact that 3PH-attached mowers are heavy, have a low center of gravity, and are on/near the ground.

    My 3PH arms operate together - lift one, and the other rises to match. This connects the tractor to the mower in such a fashion that the tractor can't roll independently of the mower. In effect, the mower acts as a couple hundred pounds of ballast that only affects the tractor as it tries to lift on one side.

    There is a hill that I normally mow across, and it doesn't feel very intimidating. When I got my first tractor, I had already mowed the hill, and was carrying the deck off the ground to head for another area. While crossing the hill, the right rear wheel came off the ground. Although it was quite a shock, I was able to steer downhill and get all 4 wheels back on the ground. In retrospect, dropping the deck would likely have stabilized things, but I acted out of reflex. This happened with a RFM that has 4 wheels riding on the ground when mowing..............chim

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    769
    Location
    MD
    Tractor
    New Holland TC33D

    Default Re: Gyro action -- an aid to hillside mowing?

    Hmmm...formulas & calculations, precision measurements to determine your center of gravity, coefficients of friction, tractor mass, speed, mass of your blades, speed of your blades, etc. How about trial and error, drive your slope without your flail running: do you slide or do you roll? Oh yeah, use a professional driver on a closed course, and always wear a helmet. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/laugh.gif[/img] Sorry, I couldn't resist.

  8. #18
    Super Member
    Rest in Peace
    frank_f15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    6,033
    Location
    BUFFALO ,NEW YORK AREA
    Tractor
    kubota b2400- R4 tires

    Default Re: Gyro action -- an aid to hillside mowing?

    <font color=red> DO U THINK WE MIGHT BE MAKING THIS A BIT TO COMPLICATED</font color=red> my theory is if idon't look safe . don't do it.

  9. #19
    Silver Member MikeOConnor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    163
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Tractor
    Kubota M6800, Power-Trac 1850 (preferred for most jobs)

    Default Re: Gyro action -- an aid to hillside mowing?

    This thread is rockin' along pretty good! Let me clarify..

    To all who posted about safety, I agree. When I start sliding, I mentally mark that place as one to avoid (I've got about 450 acres, so there are plenty of other places to play). But I routinely mow at angles greater than 20-degrees and don't slide on those hills. I've had to put a wedge under the tilt-meter to add 10 degrees in order to avoid burying it. Granted, I'm running a flail mower that's dramatically offset from center, have weight in all 4 tires, have the rear tires as far apart as they'll go, and always mow with most of the mower on the "high side."

    For those of you who posted about the math, *that's* what's been tickling my brain. John's post about the rotation of the engine, vs the PTO, vs the mower is exactly what I've been puzzling.

    Note: my bike has wheels that weigh about 3 pounds in rotation and they provide enough gyro to keep me (about 150 pounds) from falling over. My mower has about 1000 pounds in rotation, at a much higher speed. So I'm thinking it would have a fair amount of energy available to keep my (3000 pound) tractor upright. But I ran into that same equation that WVBIll posted and it made my head hurt.

    Here's a site that helps get the math down to something I can handle. Note the last little bit where it talks about what happens when you double the mass, or rotation or whatever;

    http://www.accs.net/users/cefpearson/gyro.htm

    With regard to John's comment about the plane of the rotary mower -- my theory is that *both* rotary and flail mowers are oriented correctly to resist rolling motions of the tractor -- they're 90-degrees different (horizontal vs vertical), but they are both in the same plane from the gyro standpoint.

    The tires are also in the right plane to resist rolling, but as the equation points out, they're rotating a lot slower so they offer less advantage.

    I agree -- the *engine* (flywheel, PTO, etc.) isn't in the right plane to resist rolling.

  10. #20
    Veteran Member chim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    2,253
    Location
    Lancaster County, PA
    Tractor
    Kubota L3200, Ford 1210

    Default Re: Gyro action -- an aid to hillside mowing?

    <font color=blue>"Note: my bike has wheels that weigh about 3 pounds in rotation and they provide enough gyro to keep me (about 150 pounds) from falling over." </font color=blue>

    Mike, I'm no engineer and I have only a small understanding of gyroscopic effect. I sure have a gut feeling that your spinning wheels have about the same influence as the gravitational pull of the moon when it comes to riding your bike. Now mebbe if they'd endure 75,000 RPM's things would be different[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]............chim

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2016 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.