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  1. #11

    Default Re: Bushhoggin underbrush

    Good job MossRoad!

    Enjoyed the action...nice having a fast connection. Probably would have been in bed before they loaded over my old dial up connection.

    Bill in Pgh, PA...USA [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img] Now I KNOW I need a brush hog!

  2. #12
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    502
    Tractor
    L3410

    Default Re: Bushhoggin underbrush

    Prior answers are appropriate - lower FEL (bucket rolled back) to a foot or 2 off the ground - drive forward - everything in front of you gets knocked over, and the brush cutter (if you have a heavy duty unit, and sufficient pto power) takes care of the rest. Ascertain the maximum cutting power (width of small tree, usually like "2 inch sapling" or similar verbiage) of your brush cutter, and its' pto requirements (can cut 3/4 or 1/2 widths if your tractor gets challenged), then go.
    The first time my son got on the tractor in heavy stuff, he looked back at me as if to say "do you really want me to drive through this stuff" - yup.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    227
    Location
    Shortsville, NY
    Tractor
    New Holland TC21D

    Default Re: Bushhoggin underbrush

    MossRoad,
    Not to knock your setup, but thats not similar stuff that i have bush hogged. I have hogged tall grass and weeds but normally it stuff you cant just drive over. Sapleings in the 1-2 inch range with thorntrees and lots of thick brush is what im use to. Yours looks like a good set up for what your doing though. Its all backing up for the first pass and some pushing over with the loader combined with hogging,
    Larry

  4. #14
    Epic Contributor MossRoad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    22,970
    Location
    South Bend, Indiana (near)
    Tractor
    Power Trac PT425 2001 Model Year

    Default Re: Bushhoggin underbrush

    You mean like this? [img]/w3tcompact/icons/laugh.gif[/img]<A target="_blank" HREF=http://users.beanstalk.net/godollei/pt425/PT425Videos/PT425Sapling.WMV> Click here to watch a short grainy video</A> of the PT425 taking down a 2 inch sapling. It isn't a very good shot, but I can assure you that it does a very good job on anything up to about 2 inches in diameter. Next spring, I'll be sure to get some better shots of the thicker brush. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    When I use to use my IH2500b with the 5' brush hog on the 3pt hitch, I would be dead dog tired at the end of a day of backing into everything. Now, I actually enjoy using this thing. I can honestly say that it takes me half the time with a 48" brush hog on the 25HP Power Trac than it did on my 50HP IH with a foot bigger deck on the 2 inch and under stuff. Plus, I don't have to worry about the radiator getting poked, or saplings popping up to damage the underside, because if the brush hog goes over it, it is gone before the tractor gets there.

    Now, if your talking 3inch trees, the PT has to work with the FEL to dig up the roots to tip them over, while with the old IH, I could just push its FEL into anything up to about a foot in diameter and just step on the forward pedal. There is a big difference between an 1100 pound machine and an 8000 pound machine, for sure[img]/w3tcompact/icons/laugh.gif[/img]

    I see by your profile that you have the 21HP NH. I looked at those when I was searching for tractors. Sure was the most comfortable of all the ones I tested. Does your seat swivel a bit to help with watching the rear brush hog?

  5. #15
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    296
    Location
    Zelienople, PA
    Tractor
    L2500

    Default Re: Bushhoggin underbrush

    cool videos!

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