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  1. #1
    Silver Member
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    Jun 2010
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    233
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    N. Mississippi
    Tractor
    Ford 1510

    Default my dilemma

    OK guys, last week I posted a thread asking about box blading with turf tires on my tractor. It rained a LOT last night and my back yard swamp has reappeared so this morning I went out and took some pictures of the raging waters. This is NOT the worst it's been. It has come down to the point that I would've been scared to cross this area it was running so fast. But this gives an idea of what I'm dealing with. I've attached pictures of the runoff and also an overhead view of the path it takes. I know the pictures don't give a clue as to the actual terrain and slope but I'll try to get elevations of the areas once it stops raining to add to this.

    The red lines on the picture indicate the path of the water as it runs across the properites. The orange circular area is where it pools up when the pond gets too full and the blue circles are mounds of dirt left over from previous digging (before I owned this place). The smaller one is from the dig out of the pool in the upper left of the picture and the larger one was moved from where the pond was dug out. I own both lots in the picture (green lines) so making grading changes is entirely up to me. I've got a son in law who works for a company that has bobcats with FELs that I can get onsite.

    Here are my initial thoughts:
    Area 1 - use dirt from the mounds to build up on either side of the water run just to try to keep it focused as it runs.

    Area 2 - I'm thinking of digging out where it runs from my back yard to the back lot over towards the pond, again just to channel it. I'm not talking about digging it out much, just to define the run more.

    Area 3 - I would use more dirt to line and define the edges.

    Area 4 - The runoff from this neighbor's yard is much less than the others but it too needs focusing so it's not so wide as it runs down. I would try to build it up again on either side to do this.

    I've still got to cut both lots so anything I do can't be so drastic that it prevents that. Do these ideas make sense?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails my dilemma-1-neighbors-yard-jpg   my dilemma-2-across-my-backyard-jpg   my dilemma-3-crossing-over-into-back   my dilemma-4-then-across-back-lot   my dilemma-5-water-also-comes-down  

    my dilemma-overhead-view-backyard-swamp-jpg  
    ___________________________
    1986 Ford 1510
    5' Bushhog (no name version)
    5' Finish Mower
    26 gal Femco 12v trailer sprayer
    2000 52" Great Dane Surfer (18hp Kohler Command)
    2010 John Deere Z920A 54" (26hp Kawasaki)
    ________________________________
    “Being a wealthy redneck has its advantages...”
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    The decisions you make will determine whether you win... or lose.

  2. #2
    Super Star Member TripleR's Avatar
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    Mar 2009
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    18,233
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    Missouri
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    Kubota M8540HDC, L5740HSTC, BX2200, BX2660, John Deere 425&1025R, Case, Massey Ferguson, Ford

    Default Re: my dilemma

    You sure have my sympathies, my son and I are doing something similar to keep the water off of our firing range and we are using an M8540 and L5030. We had a Bobcat 864 out there for a while, but it did not work well for moving large amounts of dirt though it was great for digging. We will finish up this spring. We would have completed it already, but we are also building up berms.

    We have been going by checking water flow and judging heights, but will finish up with a transit.
    "An opinion should be the result of thought, not a substitute for it." - Jef Mallett

  3. #3
    Super Member AKfish's Avatar
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    Oct 2004
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    5,239
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    Kasilof, Alaska
    Tractor
    JD 5075M; JD 110 TLB; JD 4720; Ford 9N; JD X300R

    Default Re: my dilemma

    I've got some drainage issues on my place, too. I have considered moving dirt around to either raise the low ground and make it high enough that it dries out faster.

    Lately, I've begun to consider the use of drainage tiles or underground piping similar to the perforated PVC tubing used in leach fields for septic systems.

    The perforated pipe would be buried in a 2 foot deep trench and routed towards an area that I don't plan to mow or crop i.e.; a pond or catch basin.

    In your situation, the buried pipe could be directed towards the pond, for example. 'Course you'd have to use a pretty accurate transit with the slope of your trench @ 1-2%.

    Another consideration would be to ensure that the pipe did not seal up over time with sediment but would continue to drain off the flood waters to the pond.

    A possible source of information might be your local NRCS office or county extension agent. They might have solutions that will keep you outta trouble with your neighbors, the county and maybe the EPA....

    Best of luck.

    AKfish
    "Most people want to live on top of the mountain, but all the happiness and growth occurs while you're climbing it."

  4. #4
    Super Member JB4310's Avatar
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    Feb 2005
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    5,645
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    Central CT
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    J.D. 4310 E-hydro

    Default Re: my dilemma

    I didn't study every detail, but in general you want to enhance what the water is trying to do now and provide a defined swale to the pond. a box blade would work nicely for that job.

    I dried up a low wet area on my property with a drain swale down the middle. the trick is to work with the topography as much as possible, the best way to do that is to observe it when it's flooded, like in your pictures.

    JB.
    JD 4310; E hydro, 300CX, 48 BH, 60" box, 72" rake, 72" rear blade, cast pallet forks, 48", 61"HD & 73" high volume bucket.
    FORD 1700; 2 WD, 2600 hrs.
    JD 320; Hydra lift, 48" deck and 48" snow blade.
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  5. #5
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    233
    Location
    N. Mississippi
    Tractor
    Ford 1510

    Default Re: my dilemma

    Thanks guys, good suggestions there.

    AKFish, I had completely forgotten about it until you started talking about burying pipes, but right across the fence in back lot is a sewer pipe that travels the whole length of the fence, then turns to go up along the neighbor's lot by area 4. So anything that I do is going to have to be done on top.
    ___________________________
    1986 Ford 1510
    5' Bushhog (no name version)
    5' Finish Mower
    26 gal Femco 12v trailer sprayer
    2000 52" Great Dane Surfer (18hp Kohler Command)
    2010 John Deere Z920A 54" (26hp Kawasaki)
    ________________________________
    “Being a wealthy redneck has its advantages...”
    Willie Robertson, CEO Duck Commander

    The decisions you make will determine whether you win... or lose.

  6. #6
    Veteran Member
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    Jan 2010
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    Piedmont, NC
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    Kubota L4610 & BX2230, Farmall Super M, Super A

    Default Re: my dilemma

    If it were just Mother Nature at work, in maybe 50 years there would be a naturally made gully or stream for carrying that drainage to the pond. But it's also your field now and you've got to come up with something that will keep you and Mother Nature happy.

    Underground piping isn't the answer... you get a torrent coming through periodically that would overwhelm anything less than gigantic. Keep in mind anything you do to narrow the channel of water will increase how fast it flows, maybe increasing the erosion process, since you might wash out any vegetation you try to grow. It might be your best option is to give the water an erosion resistant channel to follow (i.e. lined with rip rap, for example).

    I would consult with an engineer, soil conservation department or ag extension service to get on-the-scene advice.

  7. #7
    Elite Member Don87's Avatar
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    May 2010
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    SW Pa.
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    Massey Ferguson GC2400

    Default Re: my dilemma

    JB4310 has a good idea, a boxblade could do you a world of good in this instance. You don't want a river, just a diversion.

    Seeing the property would be the best thing, but, it looks like you have a workable plan.

    The treeline at the back, and down the right side............doesn't show much on the pics, is there a potential problem there also?

    The orange area...........'without seeing the lay of the ground in person'.............I think you may be stuck with it.
    Don

    MF GC2400, FEL, 60in.MMM, 5ft. Cultivator, Single Bottom Plow, Bush Hog RTC48 tiller, MF 2360 front mount snowblower, 5ft backblade. BXpanded Piranha toothbar.

  8. #8
    Super Member Gary Fowler's Avatar
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    Jun 2008
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    9,658
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    Bismarck Arkansas
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    2009 Kubota RTV 900, 2009 Kubota B26 TLB & 2010 model LS P7010

    Default Re: my dilemma

    I looks like you have a natural swale that provides drainage. You just need to enhance it so the middle is a little deeper and turn it from several yards wide to just several feet. It doesnt need to be a deep ditch to drain that land. If you have a good eye you could do it with a box blade, but to get the correct fall all the way so you dont have any standing puddle areas, you need to be using a surveyor level or laser level to check the grade all the way. You could start with just a few passes with a straight blade or box blade that is tilted slightly to make a slight swale and then wait for the next rain to see what happens or rent a level to check your fall as you ditch. You would need to run a land plane over the low areas after you ditch it to make sure you arent leaving some dams that block the inflow of water. THis could make it worse than it is now if you throw up a berm between the swale and the the higher land, it will move the standing water back up the hill. We had a swamp on our land that ran parallel to a creek. It couldnt drain into the creek because there was a high ridge that blocked it from getting there so it was always full of water. We finally got a dry spell last year that allowed us to move that ridge into the swampy area and allow the whole thing to drain naturally again.
    2010 LS P-7010C 20F/20R gear tractor & FEL, 2009 Kubota B 26 TLB, RTV 900 Kubota,17 foot Lund boat with 70HP motor, 2012-20 ft 12k GVW trailer, 2011- 52" Craftsman ZTR mower, 2013 Ferris Zero Turn, 3 weed whackers, pressure washer, leaf blowers, 7 foot bush hog, 8 foot landscape rake , 8 foot 3 PH disc, 2 row cultivator, 350 amp Miller AC/DC welding machine and all the tools needed to keep them all repaired and running.

  9. #9
    Super Star Member
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    Feb 2008
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    somewhere usa
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    Deere 110tlb, 4520, x749, L130

    Default Re: my dilemma

    Quote Originally Posted by Grandad4 View Post
    If it were just Mother Nature at work, in maybe 50 years there would be a naturally made gully or stream for carrying that drainage to the pond. But it's also your field now and you've got to come up with something that will keep you and Mother Nature happy.

    Underground piping isn't the answer... you get a torrent coming through periodically that would overwhelm anything less than gigantic. Keep in mind anything you do to narrow the channel of water will increase how fast it flows, maybe increasing the erosion process, since you might wash out any vegetation you try to grow. It might be your best option is to give the water an erosion resistant channel to follow (i.e. lined with rip rap, for example).

    I would consult with an engineer, soil conservation department or ag extension service to get on-the-scene advice.

    I agree, too much water for small perf pipe and without seeing it in person it is hard to say what you need to do. A wide grassy swale planed smooth would be the best thing since you wan't the water to move as slowly as possible to prevent erosion.

    I agree with others to try to fix any places where water can pool by smoothing with a boxblade or landplane. I would smooth it and get some grass seed on it asap. You may need to seed it several times before you get full coverage. A bad storm can always be a game changer causing you to have to start over though.

  10. #10
    Platinum Member
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    May 2007
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    SW OH - near Dayton, OH
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    1978 Kubota L285, 1951 Farmall h, 1946 Farmall m, 1950 John Deere A, 1953 Ford NAA Golden Jubilee, 195? Ford 850, 1948 Case DC

    Default Re: my dilemma

    Gradually defining where you want the water to flow towards the pond with a box blade (and quickly re-seeding to prevent erosion) sounds like a good plan.

    Can not tell by the picture, but where does the pond water overflow to when the pond becomes full? It sorta looks like the far side of the pond (opposite your property's drain flow swail) is the overflow for the pond for when it becomes full. Regardless, I would want to know where the pond overflow is and where the excess pond water has to go before I altered things.

    Also, I have had good luck using a cheapy 3-pt subsoiler attachment to break up subsoil clay to get the water to simply soak into the ground quicker in those areas where it is not feasable to divert water away. Be mindful of existing drainage tiles, sewer lines, fiber optic lines, power lines etc. before attempting to subsoil anywhere. The subsoilers are great in that minimal damage is done to the existing turf - simply looks like a big knife slit in the ground, but they drastically help the water soak into the ground. Subsoiling can last in an area for multiple years too. It has been several years since I last subsoiled some of my problem areas, but I do plan to do hit them again this year though.

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