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  1. #1
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    Default what program?

    What program would be useful to major in to help me eventually start my own excavation business? Construction Management or something like Business and Marketing? Thanks.

    Blake
    WA

  2. #2
    Epic Contributor MossRoad's Avatar
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    Default Re: what program?

    I don't think business courses could ever hurt. I wish I had taken some when I was your age. Even though I don't do anything related to that, it would help me if I understood things like depreciation.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: what program?

    I agree with MossRoad . My guess is that most businesses fail from poor management decisions. They either grow too fast or make poor tax decisions or any of the other gazillion reasons. My guess is you'll do just fine from the operatin' the backhoe point of view but your challenge will come from understanding and navigating the financial, legal, tax, employee and curve ball issues. A college foundation in business would prepare you for a lot of things, just one of which could be an excavation business.

    Since it sounds like college is in your future, what about Civil Engineering? My advice is cram in all the college you can in anything you can while you can.

    Greg

  4. #4
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    Default Re: what program?

    I have a bachelors in business economics. If all you were to take for courses I would highly recommend taking micro economics. Just understanding the graphing part, and one can use that the rest of their lives.

  5. #5

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    Default Re: what program?

    I agree with others on some general business courses and maybe there's a way to find some tech school courses on diesel mechanics also that might come in handy. Or heck maybe find out what courses are required for a General Contractor's license and just take a few without getting the license.
    but hey what do i know? I'm sitting here with a Master's degree in education and a new kubota tractor that I can't get out of the woods to even make any money!
    ya just never know.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: what program?

    a little late to this thread, but u seem to have a good grasp on what is needed to accomplish your desires. u don't have a problem asking a question, which is very important. i am no businessman, but i would imagine that THINKING is very imprtant. good luck in all u do

  7. #7
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Default Re: what program?

    Blake, I'll agree with the other guys on their recommendations, but will ramble with a few of my own thoughts. I'm sure there are people your age who know what profession or occupation they want to pursue and stay with that decision, but I think many of them start with one thing in mind and then change their mind, sometimes more than once, before they finish college (yep, I was one of those and I've know many others). So . . ., unless colleges have changed a great deal since I was involved (which of course is a good possibility), certain "basic" courses are required for any degree, without regard to what your major may be. I recommend that anyone starting in college begin with English, Math, and American History classes. First reason is that I think those classes will be required no matter what degree you eventually pursue, so get them out of the way early. Second reason is that if you master "reading, writing, and arithmetic" then it'll be easier to learn anything else you want to know.

  8. #8
    Epic Contributor MossRoad's Avatar
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    Default Re: what program?

    <font color=blue>if you master "reading, writing, and arithmetic" then it'll be easier to learn anything else you want to know. </font color=blue>

    Ahh, the 3 Rs.... readin', ritin', and 'rithmetic... [img]/w3tcompact/icons/laugh.gif[/img]

    You got that right! One of the main problems that I run into in life is my lacking math skills. I've got down add, subtract, multiply and divide. Those are easy. Geometry and trigonometry, that's where I fail to excel. I've found that there are a surprising numbers of angles in real life [img]/w3tcompact/icons/laugh.gif[/img]

    I've tried several times to memorize the formulas, but they just don't click. Fortunately, I can find the formulas rather quickly, if needed, but it sure would be handy if I knew them by heart and knew which ones to apply to different situations.

    Hmmm... sounds like I should go back to school. Maybe I'll buy some of those Math Blaster programs for the PC. Couldn't hurt.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: what program?

    The program that teaches you to seek guidance, assistance, asking questions and getting help which is what you are doing with this thread... but you will have to go farther.....

    Go to the Small Business Association office..even if it means taking a day trip somewhere...

    Most small business fail because the are "underfunded" meaning not enough working capital to get going until there is enough income stream to sustain it.... also, a "cushion" for the slow or hard times...

    Put together a good "business plan" to seek funding - so a course in doing this would be beneficial... then make sure you have an accountant to help with equipment depreciation, expenses etc...

    Again, unless you also have a regular job or other income, you will have to have it layed out properly....


  10. #10
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    Default Re: what program?

    I would go with the construction management. My brother got this degree and he said it was very helpful in his business. He worked for one of the biggest contractors in the nation through school and then started his own. Because he was in school alot of the upper management guys would take him under his wing and show him the things he was studying. The talks I've had with him the firsthand experience and then the education was invaluable.

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