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  1. #11
    Elite Member Gary_in_Indiana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    3,388
    Location
    Fort Wayne, IN
    Tractor
    John Deere 4200 MFWD HST w/ JD 420 FEL w/ 61" loader bucket & toothbar & JD 37 BH w/ 12" bucket

    Default Re: To start or not to start

    I start mine (Deere 4200) and run it at about half throttle every couple weeks in the barn if I go that long without using it. I don't know about a tractor, but with a car running it just at idle speed doesn't give it enough RPM to charge the battery (at least that's what my Dad told me years ago [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img] ).

  2. #12
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    1,070
    Location
    Western Washington
    Tractor
    5300 JD 4X4

    Default Re: To start or not to start

    Your dad was right at the time of the generator. Alternators on the other hand will charge at an idle.

  3. #13
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    48,947
    Location
    Central florida
    Tractor
    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: To start or not to start

    My NH dealer told me if I was going to leave mine set for over a month, to start it once a month, and then back it out ofd the barn, switch into 4wd and pull back in, then disengage.. Was said that that keeps the tops of the gears in the front drivetrain from getting surface rust from condensation.

    Soundguy

  4. #14
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    8,060
    Location
    Shingle Springs California
    Tractor
    New Holland TC40D

    Default Re: To start or not to start

    It's a good idea to start them and run them. It helps charge the battery, and gets the oils circulated.

    When you do though, you want to run it up to full operating temp. You want to vaporize any mositure that might have built up in the motor. You also want to get it hot enough that it is not making more moisture.

    You know how you get water coming ff the exhaust on a cool morning when you first start your truck or car? That's a byproduct of the cumbustion process. Once the engine and exhaust are warm enough, you don't have all that water coming out. That's what you want to shoot for.

    My Granpfather used to go through an exhuast system every couple of year on his '69 GMC 2500. He used a work truck most of the time. He used this truck around the ranch, and a trip to the store once a week(only about a mile). That 396-4bbl just did not warm up in that short trip. It left lots of moisture in the exhaust, and the exhaust would just rust out(before stainless exhaust became popular).

    It's also good to drive them a bit, just so the ring gears in the diff's throw some oil around(as well as the rest of the gears).

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