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  1. #21
    Veteran Member Jay4200's Avatar
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    Nov 2005
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    Hudson/Weare, NH
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    L4200GST w/ LA680 & BX2200D w/ LA211

    Default Re: Loaded Tires - any down sides?

    Quote Originally Posted by caspar3259 View Post
    Thanks for all the comments. The tractor I'm looking at is a kubota L3800, so HP in the mid-30's and weight around 2600 (w/o attachments, I presume). Most likely R4 tires.

    The main work will be clearing snow and maintaining driveway & road. Some leveling and tree/stump removal. No lawn work. Attachments are likely to be FEL, backhoe, box blade, maybe rear snow blower, maybe front blade. I still work at my desk job, so it will be a weekend warrior most of the time.
    I avoided loading my tires on my L4200 specifically to keep the weight down. I typically carry a Woods 9000 backhoe, so there is plenty of weight there. With the backhoe mounted, my trailer weight is ~8000 pounds or so (~6k tractor, ~2k trailer), which is already pushing the limits of my pickup. I like the lighter setup for raking my road and pulling grading blades (have 4x4 if I need traction), however, it got a little sketchy a few times while doing some loader work without the backhoe attached this summer...I'd call loaded tires a must have for heavy (dirt, rocks) loader work - unless you have a backhoe installed. Air is fine for snowblowing too, provided you have chains, but you might be better off with filled tires if you are pushing a snowplow.

    JayC

  2. #22
    Super Member JDgreen227's Avatar
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    Central Michigan
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    4210 MFWD Ehydro--'89 JD 318

    Default Re: Loaded Tires - any down sides?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chilly807 View Post
    As far as the added cost of tire repairs, it's not as much as some would think.

    I recently had a rear tire on my L3400 (same size as your L3800) drained, broken down to check for a leak and remounted, refilled. With a new tube installed, the whole bill was less than $100 including labour. That's not steep by any standards.

    If you do go with liquid ballast, I would recommend installing tubes in the filled tires. No matter what fluid is going in them, it's peace of mind that the rims won't corrode prematurely. Mine has calcium chloride, which is highly corrosive to steel if it's not in a tube.

    I think you'll find the tractor more stable with filled rears, no question there. The L series is light to begin with, added weight on that end is beneficial for almost any work except mowing.

    If you're going to move any amount of snow, you'll probably need chains, even with R1's and 4wd. Granted I have more snow to deal with here, but I soon put the chains on once we get any amount to speak of.

    Sean
    Good informational post, but just curious...
    Was that cost for having a service truck come to your place to fix the tire, or did you remove the rim from the tractor yourself and take it to a shop? Around here it is usually a $80 minimum just to have a serviceman show up at your door...
    Rather than worry about the things you want but don't have, be grateful for the things you don't want and don't have.

    I didn't plan to do much of anything today, but by noon I was almost half done.

  3. #23
    Elite Member Chilly807's Avatar
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    Sep 2009
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    Nova Scotia
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    Kubota L3400DT

    Default Re: Loaded Tires - any down sides?

    That was with me delivering the tire and rim to them. They charge $55 for a service call, which is pretty reasonable. I was pretty confident I could handle the loaded tire and rim, and was right for the most part.

    As long as you take your time and keep the tire upright, it's not too bad. I loaded it on a trailer with a fairly low deck height. If I had to pick it up into the back of a truck, I would have needed two of me, maybe three to be safe. Once I had it on it's side on the trailer, I could move it around with a peavey/crowbar. Sliding it without leverage wasn't much of an option.

    They're not light by any stretch of the imagination, even the smaller 11.2x24 R1's on the L3400 probably weigh in excess of 300 pounds when filled, but that's the intent.

    One benefit we haven't discussed is the lack of bounce with filled tires. It acts like a damper on the back end of the tractor.

    Sean

  4. #24
    Super Member JDgreen227's Avatar
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    Central Michigan
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    4210 MFWD Ehydro--'89 JD 318

    Default Re: Loaded Tires - any down sides?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chilly807 View Post
    That was with me delivering the tire and rim to them. They charge $55 for a service call, which is pretty reasonable. I was pretty confident I could handle the loaded tire and rim, and was right for the most part.

    As long as you take your time and keep the tire upright, it's not too bad. I loaded it on a trailer with a fairly low deck height. If I had to pick it up into the back of a truck, I would have needed two of me, maybe three to be safe. Once I had it on it's side on the trailer, I could move it around with a peavey/crowbar. Sliding it without leverage wasn't much of an option.

    They're not light by any stretch of the imagination, even the smaller 11.2x24 R1's on the L3400 probably weigh in excess of 300 pounds when filled, but that's the intent.

    One benefit we haven't discussed is the lack of bounce with filled tires. It acts like a damper on the back end of the tractor.

    Sean
    ANOTHER good informational post...and now I am glad I didn't have my rear tires loaded. That 300 pounds would outweigh me by double.
    Rather than worry about the things you want but don't have, be grateful for the things you don't want and don't have.

    I didn't plan to do much of anything today, but by noon I was almost half done.

  5. #25
    Super Star Member k0ua's Avatar
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    Branson, Mo.
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    Kioti DK35se Hydrostat

    Default Re: Loaded Tires - any down sides?

    Back in '92 I had a flat on my old Long 2360 with CaCl in it. I jacked up the tractor, and blocked it up. With the tire just barely off the ground, then rolled the tire upright to the front of the tractor, and used a chain and the front end loader to raise it enough to drive the pickup truck under it, then lowered it. Reversed the procedure to replace wheel on hub. Boy was it fun getting wheel back on hub. I used prybars to position wheel, while wife balanced it. Wheel, fluid and tire weighed well over 600 lbs. If it had ever fallen over, there would have been now way to ever get it back up. But was fairly easy to roll around upright. Safety police need not comment. I would not do it again, I would just call the tire guy.

    James K0UA
    James KUA

    Kioti DK35se hydrostat with 2 QA buckets, 48 inch. King Kutter Rotary Cutter. 750 lbs ballast box. Loaded tires, Construction Attachments SSQA Lightweight Pallet forks. EA 50 inch single lid "wicked" Grapple. Satisfied Everlast PA160 welder owner How to add a link to a post . Best way to search TBN


  6. #26
    Super Star Member
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    First organized permanent settlement in the northwest territory
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    2003 Kubota BX1500/2004 Kubota Bx23/2005 Kubota BX1500

    Default Re: Loaded Tires - any down sides?

    Quote Originally Posted by caspar3259 View Post
    Are there any down sides to the extra weight?
    -Jeff
    They are so heavy they are a problem to remove repair an replace .
    I have 3 BXs.with unloaded tires that work fine for me .
    I just have no need/use for loaded tires.
    Tractors 2003 Kubota BX1500 / 2004 Kubota Bx23 / 2005 Kubota BX1500.
    Attachments 60'' Front Blade/48'' Rear Tiller/FEL/Back Hoe /
    60'' MMM/Clamp on Forks/48'' MMM
    South of Canton Ohio L .B

  7. #27
    Elite Member
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    New Brunswick, Canada
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    Kubota L5030 HSTC, MF 5455

    Default Re: Loaded Tires - any down sides?

    I'll add, check with tire supplier. Local guy is 800$ to come, remove cacl, remove tube and replace and reload on a 16.9 x 30 vs 200$ if no cacl. Plus, without cacl, its a whole lot easier to take it to them.

  8. #28
    Super Member JDgreen227's Avatar
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    4210 MFWD Ehydro--'89 JD 318

    Default Re: Loaded Tires - any down sides?

    Quote Originally Posted by slowzuki View Post
    I'll add, check with tire supplier. Local guy is 800$ to come, remove cacl, remove tube and replace and reload on a 16.9 x 30 vs 200$ if no cacl. Plus, without cacl, its a whole lot easier to take it to them.
    At THAT price differential, cast weights or no weight at all look a LOT better. The more I read this thread, the happier I am I didn't have it done to my rear tires. Thanks...
    Rather than worry about the things you want but don't have, be grateful for the things you don't want and don't have.

    I didn't plan to do much of anything today, but by noon I was almost half done.

  9. #29
    Super Star Member k0ua's Avatar
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    Branson, Mo.
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    Kioti DK35se Hydrostat

    Default Re: Loaded Tires - any down sides?

    First thing is dont use CaCL, that requires a tube, and that is no good, use a non rusting fluid, and tubeless tires. Then use a plug to repair the tire on the tractor, by turning the hole up out of the fluid, and then plug the tire. If that is not possible then you will have to remove the tire, or call the tire guy. No one wants to deal with the nasty CaCl. solution. that will rust your tractor if it sprays on it, and shrinks leather (shoes, and gloves), and dries out your hands if it gets on them. No wonder some people charge so much to repair.. When I had the flat in the tubed tire filled with CaCl, I took the tire in and IIRC it was about 15 dollars to pump it out and have it repaired, and pump the fluid back in. Of course that was a "while" ago. Loaded tires can be a pain to deal with if you have a flat, but the benefits outweigh the downsides, if you need them, and I do. If you don't need them, then don't get them.

    James K0UA
    James KUA

    Kioti DK35se hydrostat with 2 QA buckets, 48 inch. King Kutter Rotary Cutter. 750 lbs ballast box. Loaded tires, Construction Attachments SSQA Lightweight Pallet forks. EA 50 inch single lid "wicked" Grapple. Satisfied Everlast PA160 welder owner How to add a link to a post . Best way to search TBN


  10. #30
    Super Member Gary Fowler's Avatar
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    Bismarck Arkansas
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    2009 Kubota RTV 900, 2009 Kubota B26 TLB & 2010 model LS P7010

    Default Re: Loaded Tires - any down sides?

    X2 for K0ua comments. The benefits outweigh the complaints but only if you need the extra weight and traction. So far I havent put any water in my LS tires but have wished for it many times when the rears come off the ground with a heavy load of dirt in the FEL. If you do any kind of ground engaging task, then you will save wear on your tires more by reducing slippage than you will cause by carrying the extra 200-300 pounds of weight.
    I have all the equipment I need to ballast mine, well may need some larger hydraulic jacks for my 7000+ pound tractor, just havent taken the time to do it. If I had the money, I would put cast iron and water ballast in mine just for the traction when using the loader.
    2010 LS P-7010C 20F/20R gear tractor & FEL, 2009 Kubota B 26 TLB, RTV 900 Kubota,17 foot Lund boat with 70HP motor, 2012-20 ft 12k GVW trailer, 2011- 52" Craftsman ZTR mower, 2013 Ferris Zero Turn, 3 weed whackers, pressure washer, leaf blowers, 7 foot bush hog, 8 foot landscape rake , 8 foot 3 PH disc, 2 row cultivator, 350 amp Miller AC/DC welding machine and all the tools needed to keep them all repaired and running.

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