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  1. #11
    Silver Member veresjwv's Avatar
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    May 2009
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    167
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    Piedmont Area, NC
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    Kubota L3400-HST

    Default Re: Lifting logs with a SCUT bucket

    Quote Originally Posted by sw18x View Post
    Hi all

    As I've already posted elsewhere, I'm in the process of buying a BX2360 (wife conceded!). We have an outdoor woodburner and get chunks/logs dropped off occasionally from a tree service. A big selling point on the BX was having the ability to lift the heavier pieces onto the splitter, saving my back for better uses. Some of these pieces are big enough for one person to handle, just very heavy, some pieces take 2, a few are too heavy for even a couple guys (maybe 300 - 350 pounds, these pieces still need to be moved around the yard though they might not end up on the splitter itself). The dealer is welding two chain hooks on the outside of the bucket (he discouraged me from having the hooks put on the top). I've been trying to plan out how I can use the FEL most efficiently for this task. So far my ideas are:

    - loop a chain from one hook to the other, with the slack hanging under the bucket. Get some mombo screw in hooks (similar to the kind that screw into walls for hanging stuff), predrill the biggest logs, screw in the hooks, and lift the logs from the hook using the chain.

    - run the chains across the hooks, drop the bucket in front of the log, roll the log across the rest of the chain, bring the hook ends of the chains back up across the top of the log and fasten to the chain near the top of the bucket, thus cradling the log with the chain.

    - buy a set of pallet forks, roll the logs onto the forks, curl the bucket so the log rests back on the bucket and lift.

    Another consideration is using the FEL to lift chunks/logs onto the back of my pickup truck, in which case I don't think I have enough lift on the FEL to do it if the log is hanging below the bucket.

    What do you think? How do you guys perform similar jobs? Looking for any feedback here (except "you bought the wrong tractor for this job!")

    Thanks, these forums are great to read and lots of helpful info.
    This is how I get the big ones on the splitter, it has worked very well for me. A little time consuming perhaps but I don't want to move too fast with the heavy ones.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -thanks-giving-09-012-jpg   -thanks-giving-09-014-jpg  

  2. #12
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
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    882
    Location
    Harpers Ferry WV
    Tractor
    Kubota L4330, 6 rear remotes

    Default Re: Lifting logs with a SCUT bucket

    Quote Originally Posted by sw18x View Post
    Hi all

    The dealer is welding two chain hooks on the outside of the bucket (he discouraged me from having the hooks put on the top).
    I don't understand why he is against hooks on top ...but I would say having only two hooks, one on each side, is an invitation to disaster ...or a requirement for always using twice as much chain as otherwise required.

    I have found it very (very) important to have any (heavy) chained load centered...otherwise raising the bucket raises the opposite rear wheel, which can be very disconcerting (and dangerous, depending) ...and, I have a heavy tractor, big loaded turfs, and usually an implement on the rear.

    I'd discuss this again with the dealer

  3. #13
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    2,944

    Default Re: Lifting logs with a SCUT bucket

    Quote Originally Posted by sw18x View Post
    Hi all

    As I've already posted elsewhere, I'm in the process of buying a BX2360 (wife conceded!). We have an outdoor woodburner and get chunks/logs dropped off occasionally from a tree service. A big selling point on the BX was having the ability to lift the heavier pieces onto the splitter, saving my back for better uses. Some of these pieces are big enough for one person to handle, just very heavy, some pieces take 2, a few are too heavy for even a couple guys (maybe 300 - 350 pounds, these pieces still need to be moved around the yard though they might not end up on the splitter itself). The dealer is welding two chain hooks on the outside of the bucket (he discouraged me from having the hooks put on the top). I've been trying to plan out how I can use the FEL most efficiently for this task. So far my ideas are:

    - loop a chain from one hook to the other, with the slack hanging under the bucket. Get some mombo screw in hooks (similar to the kind that screw into walls for hanging stuff), predrill the biggest logs, screw in the hooks, and lift the logs from the hook using the chain.

    - run the chains across the hooks, drop the bucket in front of the log, roll the log across the rest of the chain, bring the hook ends of the chains back up across the top of the log and fasten to the chain near the top of the bucket, thus cradling the log with the chain.

    - buy a set of pallet forks, roll the logs onto the forks, curl the bucket so the log rests back on the bucket and lift.

    Another consideration is using the FEL to lift chunks/logs onto the back of my pickup truck, in which case I don't think I have enough lift on the FEL to do it if the log is hanging below the bucket.

    What do you think? How do you guys perform similar jobs? Looking for any feedback here (except "you bought the wrong tractor for this job!")

    Thanks, these forums are great to read and lots of helpful info.
    Spend money (-:

    At least add a grapple to the bucket.
    Better yet get a separate grapple.
    Is this a li'l tractorette ? (I don't know the kubota product line)
    Does it have a hoe ? If so and if that has the capacity to lift what you want to move around - add a thumb to the hoe.

  4. #14
    Super Star Member RoyJackson's Avatar
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    Nov 2001
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    18,749
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    Bethel, Vermont
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    John Deere 4400 MFWD, Deere 855D UTV, Z920A Zero Turn Mower and assorted implements

    Default Re: Lifting logs with a SCUT bucket

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeL4330 View Post
    I don't understand why he is against hooks on top ...but I would say having only two hooks, one on each side, is an invitation to disaster ...or a requirement for always using twice as much chain as otherwise required.

    I have found it very (very) important to have any (heavy) chained load centered...otherwise raising the bucket raises the opposite rear wheel, which can be very disconcerting (and dangerous, depending) ...and, I have a heavy tractor, big loaded turfs, and usually an implement on the rear.

    I'd discuss this again with the dealer
    Hook at the center can result in a bent bucket (unless you brace it...been many many threads on that).
    Hooks on the ends distribute the load (on the bucket) better and you can use one chain (if it's long enough) by running through those outer hooks, then to the item you're lifting. Wish I had a pic since that would show the rigging a lot better then I can explain it.

    My bucket has 3 hooks...one in the center (for light work) and two outboard (heavier stuff, obviously). Mine are positioned the same as Veresjwv's are (pics in post #11).

    But I agree with you on NOT using one outboard hook to lift a load.
    Roy Jackson

    "Any government that does not trust its citizens with firearms is either a tyranny, or planning to become one."
    -Joseph P. Martino

  5. #15
    Veteran Member
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    Jul 2005
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    1,924
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    NH seacoast & Coos County
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    Kioti DK45S

    Default Re: Lifting logs with a SCUT bucket

    Since you're talking lifting onto the splitter I'm assuming you're already cut to length. Use tongs or something like this Log Grabber alternate to tongs

    These hooks are used on wreckers & may be available for less $. Or you could cut the handle off a couple of pulp hooks & weld on some chain for under $100.
    If you have a quick detach bucket you could get a fel mount short boom pole & with wood would still weigh less than a bucket full of dirt & would have better reach.
    Also keep in mind that lifting from one end mounted hook places tristing force on your FEL arms. Bend buckets are easier to fix than twisted loaders. When lifting from corner hooks with the chain at 45 degree angles to the load doubles the effective load on each chain. Reinforce your bucket for a center hook or get a quick attach boom pole/forks. MikeD74T

  6. #16
    Bronze Member
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    Apr 2011
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    Default Re: Lifting logs with a SCUT bucket

    Thanks for all the input.

    Just to clarify: what I'm planning on doing sounds similar to what RoyJackson described: string a chain across both outboard hooks, then center a chain with tongs coming off that. Already using the neighbor's splitter and have a design for a horizontal homebuild ready to go...Reg you're already hurting my feelings and my "l'il tractorette" hasn't even arrived yet. I admire all the big boys but my property doesn't justify anything bigger than a subcompact. I had to laugh at the smart@ss comment about cutting smaller logs, you're right that would seem to be the easiest solution But the situation is, the tree guy drops off what he likes and I don't turn anything away when it's free wood. I only have an 18 inch bar on my saw and it's a bigger pain to cut a 24" or 30" log with a saw than it is to dump it on the splitter and let the 4 head take care of it that way. As far as loading in the truck, I only have a 5 foot lift on the bucket so loading on the tailgate is exactly what I had in mind. Still need to figure that one out, because with the log tongs there's no way I can lift the bigger pieces that high. It's not a necessity now to load the truck, but one of the local surgeon's gave me a green light to go down to his yard and take away the bigger pieces he's got there (again, I can cut those pieces up with the saw for transport but even a chunked up 30" piece is a hefty lift into the pickup). I agree on the grapples, but I used up all my points getting the wife to agree to the tractor to begin with, it's been made very clear that there will be no expensive implements added on any time soon.

    Best place for a heavy duty set of tongs? Straps for logging? Any more pics or ideas would be appreciated.

  7. #17
    Platinum Member
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    May 2004
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    882
    Location
    Harpers Ferry WV
    Tractor
    Kubota L4330, 6 rear remotes

    Default Re: Lifting logs with a SCUT bucket

    getting big pieces into the truck: (1) its amazing what you can haul up an inclined plane...make/buy one, then rig a pulley at the front of the bed, behind the cab and with winch rope, pull it up the ramp by backing tractor up ... (2) buy a small HF (ATV) winch and mount in truck bed, pull up ramp; (3) push up ramp w. bucket; (4) make a "loading dock" to get your tractor high as/higher than the bed...or, your truck lower

    Just thinking out loud

  8. #18
    Veteran Member
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    Jul 2005
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    NH seacoast & Coos County
    Tractor
    Kioti DK45S

    Default Re: Lifting logs with a SCUT bucket

    sw18x " string a chain across both outboard hooks, then center a chain with tongs coming off that.'

    Be very careful with that. Sideloaded hooks can release a chain quite easily if you bump the load on tailgate or splitter. MikeD74t

  9. #19
    Super Star Member
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    Aug 2001
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    Upper Midwest USA
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    JD 4300, JD X485 JD 4x2 Gator, JD 425, JD455

    Default Re: Lifting logs with a SCUT bucket

    sw18x
    I have used my logging tongs to lift large rounds onto the splitter, but found that the tongs and chain would get in the way of splitting.
    What I do now, is have the firewood blocks cut to length with the chainsaw. Then I roll one or two of them into the bucket and move the bucket to the splitter with the lip at splitter height. Then I can pull a block at a time off onto the splitter. Half of the first split goes back in the bucket, while I either hang onto the other half or let it drop to the ground.

    I find when working alone, that raising the large rounds in the bucket and working out of the bucket works most efficiently for me. Don't have the bucket and chain and logging tong hanging around over the splitter when I'm splitting, as it is not as safe as I'd like it to be.

    Another option I've used is to put an empty pallet on my forks, and roll some rounds on the pallet and use that pallet as a work platform at splitter height.

    For any very large rounds, or knarly crotches, I just bust them down into smaller pieces using the chainsaw. It is prolly as fast as raising them onto the splitter.

  10. #20
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    111
    Location
    Washington Grove, Maryland
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    Kubota, BX22

    Default Re: Lifting logs with a SCUT bucket

    SX18x,
    I have a BX22 with the FEL & BH. I put a Bro-Tek Thumb on the BH & splitting is now a breeze. Definitely the way to go if you can. Forks on the Bucket if not. The advantage with the BH is being able to pick it up and shift it around until it will sit on the splitter, less of an issue if your splitter is vertical. My
    T-Man.

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