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  1. #11
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    1,534
    Location
    Blair, Ne.
    Tractor
    L3130

    Default Re: How NOT to run a machine.

    OMG!!!....LOL!!!!!

    The voice of Stewie from Family Guy is ringing in my head.
    "Good God Man...What the Ell were you thinking!!"

  2. #12
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    1,534
    Location
    Blair, Ne.
    Tractor
    L3130

    Default Re: How NOT to run a machine.

    I'll have to give waxing the bucket a shot then, thanks.

  3. #13
    Elite Member thcri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    4,641
    Location
    Minnesota SE
    Tractor
    New Holland TC29D, 2001

    Default Re: How NOT to run a machine.

    Just got back from Jamaica and could not believe what I saw. Ford/New Holland 2120 I think it was with a FEL. Tree stump, too tough for the tractor to move, so let's back up about 15 feet and ram the stump. I told me wife that is about as dumb as dumb gets. This went on for a while with no luck on moving the stump. About an hour later I noticed the stump was still there but the tractor was around back of the resort with the hood off of it. I can not believe that they didn't twist the loader or something like that.

    Stupid is as Stupid Does


    Murph

  4. #14
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    0

    Default Re: How NOT to run a machine.

    This is for Taylor Lambert, I understand what you're saying on being careful not to let the wrong people use your equipment. Unfortunately, I'm at some point going to own my own business and when things go well, I'll be purchasing more machines and eventually will need employees. Every machine I buy I'm of course going to really like, but I'll pick my favorite bunch and not let anyone else use them. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img] But others brought up a very good point that I didn't even consider, that is to take a some time and teach someone briefly on how to properly do things. That's what my boss did, I've found things through experimenting (more so using the hoe) that I like better than how my boss does it. My way is of course safe and not destructive. It's okay to take things from what you've learned by someone else and what you've learned yourself, and just use those. It's also important to stress how NOT to use a machine. Hopefully I'll get some loyal people, but when working with the public, you run risks.

    Blake
    WA

  5. #15
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    0

    Default Re: How NOT to run a machine.

    Crhis...when you use the hoe and you need to get up really high off the ground for some reason, you use the hoe to push yourself up after the stabalizers stop lifting you. Then, use the hoe to slowly lower yourself. If you just lift the stabalizers when a couple feet off the ground, you run the risk of breaking something. Everything else is pretty easy. Shaking the bucket a few times fairly hard won't do too much harm, don't over do it though, in the end a shovel might be neccessary. If you travel in second gear, and your backhoe's hoe has a little too much play when in the lock position like mine, don't let it bounce around too much or else you'll break the latch or something, use the hydraulics to hold it.

    Blake
    WA

  6. #16
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    2,816
    Location
    Iuka Mississippi USA
    Tractor
    3550 Fard Backhoe and a 1948 Farmall Cub,

    Default Re: How NOT to run a machine.

    It doesnt hurt a bucet or boome to shake it, Most of the excavators and hoes ive been around dont have a cushioned cylinder on the dump cylinders so you can pop you bucket. My brother showed me a trick to do in the morning first thing when no inspectors were around was to pull my personal dumptruck up to the fuel barrel and coat the bed bottom and sides with fuel. Lets the clay mud fall out. The next alternative was riveting hars slick plastic or fiberglass sheets to the bottom and sides of the bed. The best thing for buckets is waste oils and fuel. We had seveal jobs in the deltal in Gumbo mud, and brother bough a used bucket and i made 2 other bucktes to modify for that sticky stuff. To do that you burns sveral holes in the bucket. Most are 1 to 2 inches and being my brother had to be right on on evenly spaced. It beaks the suction of the mud on the bucket. Here in north Mississippi we only have to dige down a few inches to hit sand, so its not a big prblem with mud.
    I dont use my loader on mu Ford hoe to dig in hard ground usualy i load out of loose piles. The county hires helpers that dont know or care about how to properly dig. They break the loader boom every 2 months in a new place. I do use it when i dig a big basement after i pamp a place off to get into
    it ill use it to finish out my teth marks ot places where spoil has strayed back in it.
    I hear folks tell me how im gonna ruin a tire on a nail when i clean up burnt houses. I tell them a ggod operator wont wade the stuff with out his bucket down cleaning out a path. A few months ago a cleaned up a 200 foot timber chiken house that burnt and had only one front flat due to having teating out a bad valve stem on a brick.

  7. #17
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    0

    Default Re: How NOT to run a machine.

    yes there is a big difference between operating and running(ruining) a piece of equipment.

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