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  1. #21
    Platinum Member
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    Mar 2010
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    567

    Default Re: BX1860 OVERHEATS (?)

    Quote Originally Posted by Don87 View Post
    I am going to post this at the risk of being called a troll.

    From your link:
    COOLING SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS
    The conventional spark ignition gasoline engine is
    not a very efficient powerplant. A considerable
    amount of the available fuel energy must be rejected
    from the metal combustion chamber parts by the
    coolant and dispersed to the atmosphere through the
    radiator. This heat rejection is necessary in order to
    prevent thermal fatigue of the pistons, cylinder walls,
    and the cylinder head. Another problem is that the
    combustion chamber must be cooled enough to prevent
    preignition and detonation

    Last I looked the BX series is diesel.
    LoL.

    Please elaborate on how the thermal characteristics, and cooling system operation specifically, differ between a gasoline internal combustion engine (aka spark ignition) and a diesel internal combustion engine (aka compression ignition).

    Let's see, common to both:
    1) 4 cycle operation (intake, compression, power, exhaust) -- check.
    2) some method of ignition for the fuel/air mixture -- check.
    3) expansion of hot gases driving a reciprocating piston -- check.
    4) water jackets surrounding the cylinder(s) -- check.
    5) water passages built into the block and head assembly -- check.
    6) crank/pulley driven water pump to circulate coolant -- check.
    7) radiator which acts as a coolant-to-air heat exchanger via forced convection cooling -- check.
    8) thermostat to regulate coolant flow, thereby regulating engine temperature -- check.

    So, please, educate us in detail on how gasoline and diesel engine liquid cooling systems differ?

    Wrooster

  2. #22
    Elite Member Don87's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    4,226
    Location
    SW Pa.
    Tractor
    Massey Ferguson GC2400

    Default Re: BX1860 OVERHEATS (?)

    Quote Originally Posted by wrooster View Post
    LoL.

    Please elaborate on how the thermal characteristics, and cooling system operation specifically, differ between a gasoline internal combustion engine (aka spark ignition) and a diesel internal combustion engine (aka compression ignition).

    Let's see, common to both:
    1) 4 cycle operation (intake, compression, power, exhaust) -- check.
    2) some method of ignition for the fuel/air mixture -- check.
    3) expansion of hot gases driving a reciprocating piston -- check.
    4) water jackets surrounding the cylinder(s) -- check.
    5) water passages built into the block and head assembly -- check.
    6) crank/pulley driven water pump to circulate coolant -- check.
    7) radiator which acts as a coolant-to-air heat exchanger via forced convection cooling -- check.
    8) thermostat to regulate coolant flow, thereby regulating engine temperature -- check.

    So, please, educate us in detail on how gasoline and diesel engine liquid cooling systems differ?

    Wrooster
    I guess because their product is specifically made for gasoline engines, ya know......like they kinda make additives specifically for the antifreeze in diesel engines, and did ya ever take notice that engine oil is specefic to diesel engines as opposed to gas engines.

    You must be right, they are the same.

    Now if you'll excuse me, I gotta clean the spark plugs on my diesel.
    Don

    MF GC2400, FEL, 60in.MMM, 5ft. Cultivator, Single Bottom Plow, Bush Hog RTC48 tiller, MF 2360 front mount snowblower, 5ft backblade. BXpanded Piranha toothbar.

  3. #23
    Platinum Member
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    Mar 2010
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    567

    Default Re: BX1860 OVERHEATS (?)

    Quote Originally Posted by mostly_gas View Post
    Not to mention cavitation which can ruin an engine block.
    Cavitation is the result of a dynamic fluid flow resulting in pressure drop, such as behind a propeller. It can also occur when engine coolant system flow velocities are very high.
    Cavitation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Compare with nucleation:
    Nucleation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    In general, local nucleation and subsequent bubble collapse can result in similar symptoms, but pure water has a much higher thermal conductivity and heat capacity than 50/50 water/glycol solution. Hence, it is typically the case that even though water has a lower boiling point than a 50/50 solution, the cooling system efficacy is higher and operating temperatures are lower. For this reason, pure water is used in race car applications -- lower engine temperatures and/or a smaller/lighter radiator, which reduces frontal drag area. (Aside from the fact that coolant additives are usually not permitted by race organizers, in order to prevent contamination of the track surface in the event of an accident).

    Quote Originally Posted by mostly_gas View Post
    If you want to run water, be my guest. Properly mixed anti-freeze does raise the boiling point reduce corrosion lube the water pump and reduce cavitation.
    No, I don't want or need to run water. It was asserted above that a 50/50 mix of water and glycol solution would provide better cooling than pure water. It does not. Pure water provides the best cooling performance, albeit with the limitations I enumerated and you buttressed as well.

    Wrooster

  4. #24
    Platinum Member
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    Mar 2010
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    567

    Default Re: BX1860 OVERHEATS (?)

    Quote Originally Posted by fish6942 View Post
    (thread hijack)
    wrooster - Can you give me a make/model on the 3PH aerator? Does it follow the side-to-side changes in terrain OK?
    (sorry for the hijack)
    No apology needed:
    http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/a...tor-stand.html

    Wrooster

  5. #25
    Veteran Member mostly_gas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    1,970
    Location
    Missouri
    Tractor
    1979 ford 1700 MFWD

    Default Re: BX1860 OVERHEATS (?)

    Quote Originally Posted by wrooster View Post
    No, I don't want or need to run water. It was asserted above that a 50/50 mix of water and glycol solution would provide better cooling than pure water.
    Which post?

    Quote Originally Posted by wrooster View Post
    Cavitation is the result of a dynamic fluid flow resulting in pressure drop, such as behind a propeller. It can also occur when engine coolant system flow velocities are very high.
    Cavitation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Compare with nucleation:
    Nucleation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    you can argue what the actual name is - cavitation is the name commonly used by most people on this site. the damage is real and certain design factors make it more likely. While all glycol based coolant don't prevent it
    pure water definitely does not.
    BTW what doe increasing the thickness of the oxide layer ( corrosion from running water) going to to the thermal efficiently.

    please answer my last question why bring up running water when no overheat is indicated?

  6. #26
    Padawan Tractor Learner
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    Johndeere3720's Avatar
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    Mar 2009
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    Location
    NW Oregon
    Tractor
    Deere 317 & L118

    Default Re: BX1860 OVERHEATS (?)

    I'm not sure if this would be a culprit to running hot but on JD's 3000 series tractors if the air filter is dirty they will over heat. This also applies to when the radiator screen is plugged. Not sure if this post will help or not.
    My Fleet:
    2004 Deere 317 Skid Steer Loader
    66" Construction bucket, imatch QA adapter, CU72 Jake Rake, Middle Buster, 60" Landscape rake, 54"x 48" Pallet forks
    2005 John Deere L118
    42" deck

    Check out my rakes: www.Jakesimplements.com

    Member of the TBN "Young gun" Club

  7. #27
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    123
    Location
    East Texas
    Tractor
    Kubota (do not currently have one of my own)

    Default Re: BX1860 OVERHEATS (?)

    Coolant info:

    1. Water absorbs and disipates (maybe spelled wrong) heat better that a water/antifreeze mix.

    2. The correct water/antifreeze mix will have a higher boiling (and lower freezing) point.

    3. Antifreeze adds anti-corrosion additives that are very important in modern diesel engines (especially where aluminum and other metals come in contact with each other).

    4. Antifreeze also adds lubricatation and other needed additive.

    Can you run just water: Yes
    Can you run straight antifreeze: Yes
    Can you run the correct mixture: Yes

    You can also run it without any coolant, but it won't run long. Point is, you should run what the manufacturer recomends. They recomend this because it is best for thier equipment, not because they just "got a wild hair." Just my 2 cents worth.

  8. #28
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    32
    Location
    Manitoba, Can.
    Tractor
    Kubota BX2350

    Default Re: BX1860 OVERHEATS (?)

    I have a BX2350 which also comes close to overheating only when I mow rhe grass. I changed the engine oil to 15w40 and temp. now runs in normal zone. Strait water should never be run in a diesel engine as cavitation can cause the cylinder walls to pit . Diesel engine antifreeze has additives to prevent this.

  9. #29
    R.I.P.
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    Dec 2008
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    5,883
    Location
    North Carolina
    Tractor
    Kubota BX2200

    Default Re: BX1860 OVERHEATS (?)

    I tested my BX2200 temp gauge response against the actual temperature of the coolant, from start up to right hot (by blocking the radiator partially with cardboard) and I was able to recalibrate my expectations for the gauge. My gauge, on a tractor similar, but older, would need to go into the red directly to be in threat of boiling.

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