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  1. #11
    Elite Member 5030's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    4,866
    Location
    Michigan, S.E. Monroe County
    Tractor
    Kubota M9000 Hyd shuttle/Massey 1085

    Default Re: removing old fence posts

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( Is there a good way to use your tractor to remove old wooden fence posts? I guess I could use my back and kick it hard a few times. )</font>

    We have some large 6X6 posts and what I did was take the loader and jam the cutting edge into the bottom of the post right near the ground and then roll back the bucket. What happens is the bottom of the bucket becomes the fulcrum and the edge becomes the lever and you don't have to worry about lifting the tractor off the rear wheels. The roll back is your break-out force and it's usually greater than the 3 point lift capacity. As the post loosens, lift the bucket and the post will come right out. I've enev done this in frozen ground. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif[/img]

    Daryl
    Forage Services L.P.

  2. #12
    Rch
    Rch is offline
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    658
    Location
    Central Wisconsin
    Tractor
    1986 Ford 1910 with 770B (FORD) loader, 4 MFWD; 1986 Bolens G214,back hoe,loader,MFWD (Iseki) 21 hp)

    Default Re: removing old fence posts

    For posts beyond a hydraulic tug, back a rear tire right up to the post- even tip the post back a little if it will go. Wrap a chain through an opening in the central "dish" of the wheel ( through the spokes so to speak)around the tire at the top of the wheel and run it down the center of the tire to the back and then connect to the post low as the chain falls off the wheel. This won't work if the wheel center is solid as on a lot of non-adjustable, non-agriculture wheels. Gently move forward. If you got the chain attached with minimal slack, it will pull mostly up and raise the post right out. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif[/img] [img]/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif[/img] [img]/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif[/img]
    Stay away from the valve core and bigger tires work better. On a tough one I'd over inflate the tire.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    873
    Location
    N Central Ohio
    Tractor
    NH TC35D/SUPER H&M/F-20/JD B&D/FORDSON/JD250 SSL

    Default Re: removing old fence posts

    And make SURE u have a ROPS or CAB in case post falls forward.
    There was a safety concern about chaining posts to tires to self extricate when stuck and they apply here too.
    If u have a rim w/o tire put chain around post (low as u can get) then go over top of rim (set rim close to post) hook to anything and pull on chain (horizontally).
    The larger the rim the better.

  4. #14
    Super Star Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    11,496
    Location
    Upper Midwest USA
    Tractor
    JD 4300, JD X485 JD 4x2 Gator, JD 425, JD455

    Default Re: removing old fence posts

    In theory this (curling the bucket) will work, but in practice it doesn't work very often. The post has to be soft enough for the edge of the bucket to penetrate and to hold in the wood. Also, it is a good way to bend the edge of the bucket which is hard to bend back. Also a good way to just break the post off, which may or may not accomplish the objective.

    CUT's only have marginal FEL lifting force to pull posts that are tight in the ground. Those that are decayed or loose in the ground, can be pulled using the FEL. If using the FEL, be sure to have ballast on the rear end so that end doesn't lift in the air.

    But the 3pt is a better bet if just one way is planned. I'm just trying to be helpful to the original question. But I really don't mind someone trying to get posts out with the FEL. I even try that myself sometimes, at least for the easy ones. Then I go back and get the hard ones with the 3pt. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

    Hoeman00 has a good handle and obvious experience on pulling posts - IMO.

  5. #15
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    918
    Location
    QC, Canada
    Tractor
    B7500HSD

    Default Re: removing old fence posts

    You can also make yourself a simple A-frame out of 2x4's or what have you. You lean the "A" against the post at around a 60 degree angle (top resting against the post and the wide end on the ground away from the post). Hook a chain around the post at ground level. Route the other end of the chain up and over the "A", passing through the small notch at the top where the two A-frame members cross each other. Hook the chain up to the tractor an pull.

    This method attempts to transfer the forward motion of the tractor to upward force on the post. You may find that the A-frame tends to sink - try putting a piece of plywood under it.

  6. #16
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    6,737
    Tractor
    JD 8320 MFWD, JD 6415 MFWD, FEL, and cab, John Deere MFWD 4600, John Deere 4020, John Deere 4430, John Deere 455 mower, Deutz, and Gehl 4610 perkins skidsteer

    Default Re: removing old fence posts

    I like just using a handyman jack. It's faster than using a tractor usually by the time you get on and off the tractor. If you have help it's faster with a tractor.

  7. #17
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Posts
    951
    Location
    Sierra Foothills, Northern California
    Tractor
    Kubota B7300; JD LX233

    Default Re: removing old fence posts

    <font color="blue"> I like just using a handyman jack. It's faster than using a tractor </font>

    Well, yeah, that is often true...but that is like saying it makes more sense to drag the trash can down the driveway on its wheels than to spend the time required to fire up the tractor and use that [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]. But it is a lot more fun to use the tractor [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]!

    On the other hand, I've found that I usually drag the garbage down by hand any more. Trying not to put too many hours on the beast. And I'm also looking at one of those T-post pullers...should probably see if anyone has a thread about them.

  8. #18
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    726
    Location
    East Texas
    Tractor
    Kubota L4610 HSTC, International 2400, Hesston 1280,

    Default Re: removing old fence posts

    On the farm I use the tractor with a chain on front bucket, or the treegetter attachment if I have a lot to do. With it you don't have to get off the tractor.

    Attached is a picture of the pole puller I built maybe 30 years ago to pull electric service poles on job sites when construction was completed and I had to do it by hand.
    Weight maybe 10/15 lbs, easy to carry in one hand. Easy to hook up. Easy to apply full pressure. About 8 to 1 ratio. 200 lb man hanging on handle, 1600 lb lift.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #19
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    726
    Location
    East Texas
    Tractor
    Kubota L4610 HSTC, International 2400, Hesston 1280,

    Default Re: removing old fence posts

    Post puller main post is 1-1/4 thinwall conduit &amp; handle is 1" thinwall conduit with about 5/16" steel rod for truss effect.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #20
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    726
    Location
    East Texas
    Tractor
    Kubota L4610 HSTC, International 2400, Hesston 1280,

    Default Re: removing old fence posts

    Take 2 loose turns around the post with chain and as you raise the handle, chain will slide down the post, positioning you for next jacking action.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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