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  1. #21
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    1,444
    Location
    South-central Michigan
    Tractor
    New Holland TC40D

    Default Re: Bushhogging Basics

    Your need to "raise and lower" is the biggest reason why "check chains" have been used in many instances. With them there is almost never a need to do anything but lower the deck to the preset chain height and go, and mow and go - no need to ever look back. The front of the cutter deck floats with the rear tractor tires and the rear of the deck rides on the tail wheel. No gouges and no raising of the deck too high. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

  2. #22

    Default Re: Bushhogging Basics

    Duane,

    I don't quite follow the chain idea. It was the front edge of the BH that dug into the ground and this is held in a fixed position by the lower lift arms.

    Another poster wrote "On many cutters this is provided for by a short link between the cutter mast and the connection to the top link". I believe this is the set-up I have. A flat bar extends from the top link towards the back of the BH near the tail wheel. There is a short (10 inch) piece of chain that allowed the tail wheel to adjust to minor undulations on the ground. In any case, I adjusted the overall height upwards a couple inches and that pretty much solved the problem except for a couple major drop offs.

    Rick

  3. #23
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    3,675
    Location
    Grayson County, TX
    Tractor
    Kubota B2710

    Default Re: Bushhogging Basics

    In my wooded area I spend more time backing the cutter than going forward. It cuts very well both ways.

    My cutter leaks down a little while mowing. I notice the skid plates digging in. I just stop and raise the deck all the way and drop it back down and I'm good to go for another few rounds before doing it again.

    I normally use setting 5 on the control on my 2710.

  4. #24
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    1,499
    Location
    Newnan, GA
    Tractor
    NH TC29D

    Default Re: Bushhogging Basics

    Alan and Bird,
    Thanks for the replies. I didn't know if going in backwards would be more likely to shoot stuff out the front (i.e., towards me) or not. Don't actually own a brush cutter (nor tractor, for that matter. However, this I am hoping will be remedied by next week. Waiting for parts.), but will probably rent one at first when I take delivery of the 29D. I hope the rental units have chain guards - may not rent one if they don't.

  5. #25
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    1,444
    Location
    South-central Michigan
    Tractor
    New Holland TC40D

    Default Re: Bushhogging Basics

    Rick, with check chains, the front of the deck is no longer fixed because the adjustment lever for the lower links is set all the way down. However, the lower links never get there. The chains instead, which come from the front of the deck, hold the position. The links, since they're set to be all the way down, just float along. They don't move much, but it's enough to keep the deck from digging in or raising the front to high.

  6. #26

    Default Re: Bushhogging Basics

    Duane,

    If you ever get the opportunity, please photograph and post your setup.

    Rick

  7. #27
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    1,444
    Location
    South-central Michigan
    Tractor
    New Holland TC40D

    Default Re: Bushhogging Basics

    Here's the setup on my mower. My brush hog has exactly the same setup minus the trurnbuckles.

    check chains

  8. #28

    Default Re: Bushhogging Basics

    OK, I assume you can set your 3PH to free float. Therefore the chains are what is limiting the forward part of the BH from striking the ground.

    If your lift arms are not free floating, then I don't understand what the chains would do.

    In my case, I can't free float the lift arms. they stay solidly where I set them.

  9. #29
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    108
    Location
    South Central PA
    Tractor
    Kubota B7500 HST & Kubota ZD326

    Default Re: Bushhogging Basics

    rdam, free floating is not what we're talking about here. I use the check chains for position control. With the chains connected and adjusted, I'll let the 3PH down as far as it will go and it will be limited by the chains. This way I can always return to the exact same position every time no matter how many times I raise and lower it. Also, it will eliminate the 3PH creep (hyd leakage) which normally happens over time. Without the chains, I would have to guess as to the last position of the blades to ensure the cut is to the same height as before. Hope this helps [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

    Ken

  10. #30
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    1,444
    Location
    South-central Michigan
    Tractor
    New Holland TC40D

    Default Re: Bushhogging Basics

    rdam, unless you have down-pressure on your 3-pt, which I don't think many if any CUT's do, your lower arms will float as long as you set them all the way down. To check this. With your tractor running, put your tractor in neutral, with brakes locked, or whatever else you think you need to do to safely walk behind the tractor with it running, and try this: Lower the 3-point position lever all the way down, or to some very low position, then, lift one or more of the arms by hand. They should go up relatively easy, and fall back down to their starting position when let go of. If you can manually raise and lower them (remember, with the position lever set low) then your unit will float.

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