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  1. #1
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    98
    Location
    Cuttingsville, VT
    Tractor
    Ford 850, Ford 1210, Ford 1700, Bobcat 742

    Default Land plow

    I have a Ferguson single-bottom 16" plow. I have used it with my old Ford 850 and my Ford 1700. I have a copy of the Ford-Ferguson Plow Book, published for N series tractors.

    My problem is that the distance between furrows is much too wide. Per the plow book, I have set the plow beam on the cross shaft at 8 7/8", the length of the top link at 25", rotated the cross shaft so the S-turns in both ends all align in a vertical plane, and adjust the bottom links on the tractor to be level when on level ground. The coulter is sharp, and turns freely. When plowing with the right wheels in the previous furrow, the plow leaves about
    8" untouched, as if I was using only the left half of a two-bottom plow. Am eager to hear what I am doing wrong. I assume this is operator error, not defective equipment.

  2. #2
    New Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    23
    Location
    roanoke
    Tractor
    jd3032 1951jdmt

    Default Re: Land plow

    you level your plow on flat ground for your first pass. then you have to level it for your tire being in the furrow. easyest way to do this is by driving your rear wheel on to a 4x4 and leveling it that way.understand what im saying?

  3. #3
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    98
    Location
    Cuttingsville, VT
    Tractor
    Ford 850, Ford 1210, Ford 1700, Bobcat 742

    Default Re: Land plow

    Thomas- sounds easy to do, but is this going to correct the problem. Even though I have a horizontal problem, the plow sucks into the soil really well. Any chance that the plow share is incorrect ?

  4. #4
    Elite Member Chilly807's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    3,222
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Tractor
    Kubota L3400DT

    Default Re: Land plow

    When I first started reading your post, I was at a loss as to what could be wrong. After some thought, this is what I came up with... If you have a 16 inch plow, that means it will effectively turn over a 16 inch wide swath with each pass.

    So, you need to set up the plow behind the tractor so that the landside of the plow is approximately 16 inches or a little less from the inside edge of your right side tire. When the inside of the tire is up against the left edge of the previous furrow, your plow will turn over the next 16 inches of ground, and so on. From the sounds of it, you have the plow too far to the left side and it's leaving the ground between unturned.

    From what I've heard, optimum cutting depth is about 1/2 or less of the plow width, in your case 8 inches or less.

    It may take some fine tuning to get it exactly right, but I'd start there and see if it helps. Your right side check chain or turnbuckle is the adjustment you need to make, the left side doesn't do a lot anyway since the plow pulls against the right side only.

    Once you get that set right, there will no doubt be other tweaks you'll have to make. Sometimes it gets to be trial and error.

    There may be something else I'm missing, I'm no expert when it comes to plowing. I've got an old MF 2-12, incidentally.

    Sean

  5. #5
    Elite Member Chilly807's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    3,222
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Tractor
    Kubota L3400DT

    Default Re: Land plow

    Something else, my lower arm ends are 3 inches different in height when I'm set up correctly, the right side being lower. The idea is that with the right wheel in the furrow, the plow will be level. The cross-shaft ends up being cranked to adjust the plow straight behind the tractor, doesn't have much to do with setting it level or for height. You use the tilt adjustment on your lift arms for that. If memory serves, I think I jacked up the left side of the tractor 6 inches to get the plow set for level. I plow the first furrow that way, but it's not always pretty, the subsequent ones are fine.

    Sean

  6. #6
    Platinum Member nspec's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    606
    Location
    Southern Rhode Island
    Tractor
    Kubota B2630, '53 Farmall Super H, '47 Farmall AI, '44 Farmall A

    Default

    The cross shaft gets rotated to adjust which way the plow will pull, or steer. You need to rotate the shaft so the point on the share is pointing roughly diagonally across to near your front left tire. Ideally, the plow really doesn't pull to one side at all, but tracks straight. This will take some trial and error. It's not really a 'set it by the book and forget it' type thing. Also, you may have to slide the plow horizontally on the cross shaft to get the correct width. Measure over 16 inches from the inside of your right rear tire and that is where the coulter and or point should be.

    It's a great plow - I have the exact same one. I love it and wouldn't trade it for the world, it does such a nice job.

  7. #7
    Platinum Member nspec's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    606
    Location
    Southern Rhode Island
    Tractor
    Kubota B2630, '53 Farmall Super H, '47 Farmall AI, '44 Farmall A

    Default Re: Land plow

    This is what a Ferguson 16 is capable of. Play around with it and you'll get it. That's part of the fun!!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -1335798845924-jpg   -1335798845263-jpg  

  8. #8
    Platinum Member nspec's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    606
    Location
    Southern Rhode Island
    Tractor
    Kubota B2630, '53 Farmall Super H, '47 Farmall AI, '44 Farmall A

    Default Re: Land plow

    One more pic. Here you can see how the cross shaft should be oriented. The plow is taking a proper bite with no pulling to the left or right and tracks completely straight behind my tractor all on it's own with no check chains or anything. I don't have to fight the plow with the steering of the tractor at all.

    Note, in this position, my lift arms are roughly level with each when on level ground. You only have to lower the right arm for the first pass when your wheel is not in a furrow yet. Once you've made the first pass and you get the right side wheels down in the furrow, you crank that right arm pack up and try to make the plow as level and flat as possible. I'm not set up 100% in this photo. I need to tweak the right arm up just a tad to level the plow better. It takes me several passes of tweaking to get it just right.

    In other words, if I were to drive out of the furrow in this pic and onto level ground, the plow would be angled to the left and not look right. Got it?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -2011-06-21_16-46-51_872-a  

  9. #9
    Gold Member PossumHound's Avatar
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    Apr 2010
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    444
    Location
    North Carolina

    Default Re: Land plow

    Quote Originally Posted by nspec View Post
    This is what a Ferguson 16 is capable of. Play around with it and you'll get it. That's part of the fun!!
    Mighty pretty work and soil too!

    PH

  10. #10
    Platinum Member nspec's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    606
    Location
    Southern Rhode Island
    Tractor
    Kubota B2630, '53 Farmall Super H, '47 Farmall AI, '44 Farmall A

    Default Re: Land plow

    Thanks, PossumHound. I'm pretty proud of that. This was a well established oak and pine forest 3 years ago. I cut and stumped it with my little kubota one year. The next year I grew 3 consecutive stands of buckwheat turning each one under. I followed that with a fall planting of winter rye. Copious amount of manure in February, and those pics are plowing the rye under last month. I just planted the garden last week. Very satisfying to see how the soil structure has improved.

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