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  1. #1
    Platinum Member cartod's Avatar
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    JD 3320, 820,400,255

    Default My Bridge/ Culvert Project. (Pics)

    I needed an access road to my 5 acre plot. I had to go over a small creek. Used 42" 16 ga. Galvanized steel pipe. Feel free to give me pointers on maintaining the road and the bridge. This was my first attempt at this project and I'm hoping the pipe is big enough so the bridge won't wash out.














  2. #2
    Super Star Member
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    Missouri
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    Kubota, John Deere, Case, Massey Ferguson, Ford

    Default Re: My Bridge/ Culvert Project. (Pics)

    Very nice job, we have to put down a good base of 2" crushed rock to prevent ours from washing out, depending on the slope, you may need more or less. You may also want to put something around the ends of your culverts; others on here have more experience than I and can give you more specifics.
    Thread on helpful tractor abbreviations: http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/o...-acronyms.html

  3. #3
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    Mt Crawford Va
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    massey GC 2400 JD LA 145

    Default Re: My Bridge/ Culvert Project. (Pics)

    great job, might want to crown it thow so the water will run off to the sides of the road

  4. #4
    Platinum Member cartod's Avatar
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    Default Re: My Bridge/ Culvert Project. (Pics)

    Can you explain what crowning is?

  5. #5
    Veteran Member amigauser's Avatar
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    Unionville, Connecticut USA
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    Kubota Grand L 3240HST

    Default Re: My Bridge/ Culvert Project. (Pics)

    Quote Originally Posted by cartod View Post
    Can you explain what crowning is?
    Shaping Roads and Trails
    Kubota Grand L3240HST, LA724 FEL with QA, 72" QA bucket, Turf Tires, QA snow plow, QA Loader Buddy, Bradco Pallet Forks, Leinbach 72" pine straw rake, GroundWorks brush forks and Kubota L series ballast box.
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  6. #6
    Veteran Member Gordon Gould's Avatar
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    Default Re: My Bridge/ Culvert Project. (Pics)

    Very nice job. One thought though. If you are going to run anything heavy over your culvert very often I would consider more material on top. A rule of thumb for heavy usage is to cover it with material to a dept of 1/2 the culvert diameter. It is probably fine the way it is for your tractor. I have seen some with no dirt on top, but they usually get crushed pretty quick.
    If you have a county extension service or forestry office you can probably pick up a free booklet on Best Management Practices (BMP) for loggers. It will have a lot of info on methods for building and maintaining woods roads to minimize water damage and erosion.
    "If you're not making any mistakes then you're not doing anything"

    L3010DT, Farmi JL290 Winch, ATI Grapple, BearCat 5" Chipper, 6' Rear Blade,
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  7. #7
    Veteran Member Rustyiron's Avatar
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    Lakes Region, Maine
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    Default Re: My Bridge/ Culvert Project. (Pics)

    Yeah, you need to deal with the water that will come down your new road. If you put some good ditches on each side of the new road and "crown" the road, that is make the (rain) water that falls on your road make it's way to yur new (side) ditches by "crowning" or grading the road so that the center is 4" or so higher than the sides. On that slope, the more (crown) the better, in your pic looking down hill, it looks pretty steep. Mother nature will tell what you need to do, but until you get it handled, you will be dragging your road back up hill with your box blade after each heavy rain. You may end up needing to grade in some "water bars" for some severe rains. As for your nice new pipe, it looks nice! I've used bags of ready mix concrete stacked around the inlet side of the pipe for a head wall. Stack them up to form a nice inlet shape and so that the moving water will not erode around your pipe, make sure that you get some under it where the water enters, then drive some 1/2" rebar down through them in several areas (the more the better) to "tie" the whole thing together. The concrete bags will harden on there own and the bags will dissolve in a few months and it will protect your pipe in the event of a "gully washer" that will eventually come. Nice job.
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  8. #8
    Veteran Member kebo's Avatar
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    Default Re: My Bridge/ Culvert Project. (Pics)

    Like rustyiron said, if you crown it you will need some very good ditches on the sides of the road to protect it. That's a pretty steep hill and the water will pick up lots of speed going down it which could cause major erosion every time it rains. You might think about ways to divert the water away from the road maybe every 8 ft or so to keep the water from building up into a small river at the bottom of the hill during a deluge.

    The only other thing I would suggest is use riprap to cover the sides of the "dam" you made. Heavy rains could pool up on the upstream side making eddies that will scowl away the sides of the dam as it tries to get through the 42" pipe.

    Good job though!!!
    Nothing could be finer than riding my JD790 in South Carolina!!

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  9. #9
    Platinum Member cartod's Avatar
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    Default Re: My Bridge/ Culvert Project. (Pics)

    You guys are great! Thanks. I will ad some pics of the crown, and the rip rap.
    Last edited by cartod; 06-27-2012 at 12:32 AM.

  10. #10
    Veteran Member 1bush2hog's Avatar
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    Default Re: My Bridge/ Culvert Project. (Pics)

    Nice Job! Here's another link you may want to check out. A Landowner's Guide to Building Forest Access Roads - Road Construction


    BTW - Nice Razr too!
    As iron sharpens iron, so one man sharpens another. (Proverbs 27:17)

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