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  1. #31
    Elite Member Car Doc's Avatar
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    Default Re: moving a pallet of green firewood

    Quote Originally Posted by Turbys_1700 View Post
    I have been real fortunate with my clamp-ons as the bucket is still in tact and not deformed...
    My bucket has reinforcement bars welded onto the bottom of the bucket which is where I lock my forks down...
    So far so good...
    Yeah mine had them too didn't help me much. I could have fabbed them to work better by putting a steel upright at the back of the forks to tie a load binder back to the bucket but didn't.

    I found that turning the clamp on forks upside down I could straighten my bucket lip fwtw in case someone is like me and overloads their stuff.
    Yanmar YM3810D, LT duty 3pt hoe, 6' KK2 tiller, 6' KK box blade, 6 1/2' KK disc, 5' Howse bush hog, 5' Howse back blade, 9" Yellow PHD, 3 Husky chain saws 346XP NE, 359, 372XP. 07 HD Heritage Softail, Crack injectors, check compression, take 2 beers and call me. "Hey you didn't build that."

  2. #32
    Elite Member Car Doc's Avatar
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    Default Re: moving a pallet of green firewood

    Quote Originally Posted by LD1 View Post
    I guess I dont know what "myths" you are talking about.

    You said


    So what myths are you talking about??

    Since hedge is about twice as dense as cottonwood (even though they are the same btu per pound), the hedge will put off about twice the BTU's since you can get about twice as many pounds in their. Thats all I'm say'n
    What I meant was 8 thousand schmate thousand we dont know what the btu is at any point in time (myth) but load 2 stoves side by side and the output is obviously better on the heavy wood thats what I am say'n.
    Yanmar YM3810D, LT duty 3pt hoe, 6' KK2 tiller, 6' KK box blade, 6 1/2' KK disc, 5' Howse bush hog, 5' Howse back blade, 9" Yellow PHD, 3 Husky chain saws 346XP NE, 359, 372XP. 07 HD Heritage Softail, Crack injectors, check compression, take 2 beers and call me. "Hey you didn't build that."

  3. #33
    LD1
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    Default Re: moving a pallet of green firewood

    Quote Originally Posted by Car Doc View Post
    What I meant was 8 thousand schmate thousand we dont know what the btu is at any point in time (myth) but load 2 stoves side by side and the output is obviously better on the heavy wood thats what I am say'n.
    I actually find the opposite to be true FWIW. The lighter and less dense wood seems to burn up much faster (obviously) but if I go start a fire in the barrel stove in my shop, and burn the softwood stuff, my shop will heat up much faster than with hard wood. But you dont want to use it for overnight stuff. It wont last

    Whatever the BTU's are, BTU is just the total heat content of the wood. There is no time factor. And it seems to me that the softwoods give up their BTU's much faster.
    ".........there is only one way to find out."
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  4. #34
    Super Member 94BULLITT's Avatar
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    Default Re: moving a pallet of green firewood

    Quote Originally Posted by LD1 View Post
    I actually find the opposite to be true FWIW. The lighter and less dense wood seems to burn up much faster (obviously) but if I go start a fire in the barrel stove in my shop, and burn the softwood stuff, my shop will heat up much faster than with hard wood. But you dont want to use it for overnight stuff. It wont last

    Whatever the BTU's are, BTU is just the total heat content of the wood. There is no time factor. And it seems to me that the softwoods give up their BTU's much faster.
    That's what I have found too. A soft wood like Pine burns real fast and is good for quick heat but a hard wood like oak will last longer.
    Roger

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  5. #35
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    Default Re: moving a pallet of green firewood

    Quote Originally Posted by Car Doc View Post
    Yeah mine had them too didn't help me much. I could have fabbed them to work better by putting a steel upright at the back of the forks to tie a load binder back to the bucket but didn't.

    I found that turning the clamp on forks upside down I could straighten my bucket lip fwtw in case someone is like me and overloads their stuff.
    My forks have a slot cut into the 2x4 receiver at the back of the fork for using a chain and load binder...
    I've not gone that route yet but to be honest with you I have been pretty careful when using the loader...
    Your FEL may have more capacity than mine too...

  6. #36
    Elite Member Car Doc's Avatar
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    Default Re: moving a pallet of green firewood

    Quote Originally Posted by LD1 View Post
    There is no time factor. And it seems to me that the softwoods give up their BTU's much faster.
    No time factor? Humm ok as long as you are happy with that I cant argue along this line of reasoning anymore. We see "output" differently thats just the way it is we probably should agree to disagree rather than waste space on here. later
    Yanmar YM3810D, LT duty 3pt hoe, 6' KK2 tiller, 6' KK box blade, 6 1/2' KK disc, 5' Howse bush hog, 5' Howse back blade, 9" Yellow PHD, 3 Husky chain saws 346XP NE, 359, 372XP. 07 HD Heritage Softail, Crack injectors, check compression, take 2 beers and call me. "Hey you didn't build that."

  7. #37
    LD1
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    Default Re: moving a pallet of green firewood

    Wasting space on here is what I do best

    Mind if I ask how you measure "output"

    No one is saying that a fire-box full of hedge has way more BTU that a box full of cotton-wood. The hedge has about double the heat content.

    What I am saying is....The cottonwood, being so much less dense and faster burning, seems to produce a hotter fire quicker. It just dont last as long. If things were linear, and the hedge was exactally 2x's denser and with 2x's more BTU, one would think that it would burn 2x's as long, or that the cotton wood would burn up 2x's faster.

    But what I have found is that the cotton wood burns 3x's faster. And at only 1/2 the BTU's, it seems to heat up the garage quicker. But at the cost of loading the stove 3x's more often.

    Like I said, BTU dont factor in time. So what would heat a garage up quicker......

    15000 BTU's burnt in 3 hours (1/10th of a cord of cotton wood (12.8cu ft) or...........
    30,000 BTU's in 8 hours (1/10th of a cord of hedge)

    ????

    Thats all I am saying. Again, I know hedge is much better firewood and much longer lasting and the ability to get more BTU's in the firebox. But the hard dense woods dont heat my shop up as quick when going out there on a cold morning and its 40 degrees in there.

    Kinda like torque vs HP (since you are a car buff). Torque is just a raw number. A measure of how much work CAN be done. HP adds that time factor...how quick that torque can be applied.

    When dealing with propane furnaces and such, they are rated in BTU/hr. Wood cannot be rated that way because how fast it burns depends on too many factors.
    ".........there is only one way to find out."
    "Ok, hold my beer and watch this.........."


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  8. #38
    Silver Member roman's Avatar
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    Default Re: moving a pallet of green firewood

    Quote Originally Posted by 94BULLITT View Post
    That's what I have found too. A soft wood like Pine burns real fast and is good for quick heat but a hard wood like oak will last longer.
    It is much simpler to explain if everyone understands the difference is in the coals. Softwood and some hardwoods dont coal, ash doesn't much. Oak coals well and that is where you get the extra BTU's. It's in the coals...

    I tried some slip on forks. Never lifted a pallet of wood but did lift a stack of pallets that are approximitely
    500 lb. I could see right off my bucket lip would curl with a heavier load.
    I have decided to go with 3 pth forks. I will let you know what I find...

    Thank you everyone.
    Ford 1720, Sims cab, FEL, Woods subframe backhoe, Fisher 7' hydro angle plow, Wallenstein 3 pth splitter, 5' blade, 3 pth carry-all, 3 pth ballast

  9. #39
    Silver Member roman's Avatar
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    Default Re: moving a pallet of green firewood

    Quote Originally Posted by 94BULLITT View Post
    That's what I have found too. A soft wood like Pine burns real fast and is good for quick heat but a hard wood like oak will last longer.
    It is much simpler to explain if everyone understands the difference is in the coals. Softwood and some hardwoods dont coal, ash doesn't much. Oak coals well and that is where you get the extra BTU's. It's in the coals...

    I tried some slip on forks. Never lifted a pallet of wood but did lift a stack of pallets that are approximitely
    500 lb. I could see right off my bucket lip would curl with a heavier load.
    I have decided to go with 3 pth forks. I will let you know what I find...

    Thank you everyone.
    Ford 1720, Sims cab, FEL, Woods subframe backhoe, Fisher 7' hydro angle plow, Wallenstein 3 pth splitter, 5' blade, 3 pth carry-all, 3 pth ballast

  10. #40
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    Default Re: moving a pallet of green firewood

    Roman, I built these for my bucket and probably cut my capacity almost in half. As my loader only had a bit over an 900Lb lift to start off with, this was not conducive to an efficient pallet method with this tractor. The loader struggled with this load of wet oak. This pallet measures 42" wide by 3' and is piled a bit less than 2 feet. This set up costs around $400 to buy (I made mine for about $125) and what its advantage is of the easy off nature of the forks. A dedicated fork set costs around $600 but will lift heavier loads. I have a pinned loader as opposed to quick attach so I appreciate the easy off nature. although I feel the pallet method is probably the most efficient way to handle firewood as least as possible, my current set up doesn't fit in to this as I would have to have around 30 pallets to move 5 or 6 full cord of firewood. As necessity is the mother of invention, I built this big "bucket extension" as my stacks are only one width thick, I just go in back of the stack and push the wood over into the bucket. This "wood bucket" is also slipped onto the forks making it easy to remove as well.Not perfect but better than loading it once more by hand.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails moving a pallet of green firewood-p1082101.jpg   moving a pallet of green firewood-pc042077.jpg   moving a pallet of green firewood-p9012423.jpg   moving a pallet of green firewood-p9012427.jpg  

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