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  1. #1
    Platinum Member
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    upstate South Carolina, Greenville
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    Kubota M6800, Massey Ferguson 240

    Default Scoop pans....are they worth having???

    I was considering a scoop pan. I have lots of dirt roads to maintain, we have built water bars to divert the water, but it seems over time, the run-off channels fill with sediment and the water no longer runs off and it pools in the road creating a mud hole. We use a box blade to rough grade and contour these channels. A back hoe would be better but we don't have one. I wondered if a scoop pan would work to ditch these run off channels. I imagine it would be crude, but even a simple ditch would carry the water away. Can you cut a ditch with these pans, good enough to drain a mud hole???

  2. #2
    Elite Member dex3361's Avatar
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    N. of Charleston WV
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    Kubota L4400-1 HST,FEL, 3x3 remotes, TNT. BX1500 54 mmm

    Default Re: Scoop pans....are they worth having???

    Quote Originally Posted by HCJtractor View Post
    I was considering a scoop pan. I have lots of dirt roads to maintain, we have built water bars to divert the water, but it seems over time, the run-off channels fill with sediment and the water no longer runs off and it pools in the road creating a mud hole. We use a box blade to rough grade and contour these channels. A back hoe would be better but we don't have one. I wondered if a scoop pan would work to ditch these run off channels. I imagine it would be crude, but even a simple ditch would carry the water away. Can you cut a ditch with these pans, good enough to drain a mud hole???
    Most of the scoops for a CUT or smaller UT will do a fair job on soil but so good on compacted gravel. The work best on loose soil.
    Randall



    1Timothy Chapter 2:
    3 For this is good and acceptable in the sight of God our Saviour;
    4 Who will have all men to be saved, and to come unto the knowledge of the truth.
    5 For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus.
    From: The HOLY BIBLE

  3. #3
    Super Member
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    Deere 110tlb, 4520, x749, L130

    Default Re: Scoop pans....are they worth having???

    Not sure what your problem is but for diversion ditches I would consider using a rearblade to make these cuts. Also good to crown the roads with too. Is the run off carrying the road material away or is this drainage from the land around the roads? I suspect the real problem needs to be solved as drainage ditches filling up would make me think these are running uphill.

    We had a pan such as you describe when I was a kid, I unfortunately have more experience using it than I care to remember. They can be useful for certain jobs but I am not fond of them.

  4. #4
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    MtnViewRanch's Avatar
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    Default Re: Scoop pans....are they worth having???

    A good rear blade is what you need. No problem ditching, or grading.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -img_0295-jpg   -img_0296-jpg   -p4070006-jpg   -p4070003-jpg  
    Brian
    Top and Tilt Kits by Fit Rite Hydraulics

  5. #5
    Elite Member Don87's Avatar
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    Massey Ferguson GC2400

    Default Re: Scoop pans....are they worth having???

    Could person possibly use a potato plow for a ditch. Would be less intrusive than a scoop or pan.
    Don

    MF GC2400, FEL, 60in.MMM, 5ft. Cultivator, Single Bottom Plow, Bush Hog RTC48 tiller, MF 2360 front mount snowblower, 5ft backblade. BXpanded Piranha toothbar.

  6. #6
    Platinum Member terry.dinerman's Avatar
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    "The Old Goat Ranch" Grimes County, Texas
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    1990 - JD 870

    Default Re: Scoop pans....are they worth having???

    Scoop pans are wonderful things for moving a lot of dirt if your tractor is not equipped with a front end loader....like mine...I have moved hundreds of yards of material with my little 850 John Deere and once you get a rhythm going it will surprise you what you can accomplish...

    But I would rather milk a porcupine than try to cut a ditch with it...

    If your box blade is as wide as your wheels, you already have an excellent tool for cutting a ditch and maintaining the crown on your road....If it is larger or smaller....well...that may complicate things a bit, but try this out anyway....

    Start by parking on a level surface, and raise the box to its full height....lower one side of your box blade to within about 4" or so of the ground...drop the scarifier tooth on that side as well...make sure you have clearance to drive around with the box lifted to full height without dragging that tooth on the ground...

    ....enter the ditch and begin the cut by dropping the blade into the dirt as deep as you can without loosing traction...the tooth will rip up the accumulated silt, the dislodged dirt will pile up in the box and naturally roll towards the gap at the high side of the blade, where it spills out creating a nice berm of loose soil at the side of the ditch.

    Repeat as nessesary...

    One my 1200' long driveway, which is right up against a fence, I have to raise the blade and drive all the way back to the front to make additional cuts...if you have two sided access, or are ditching both sides of the road, you can make cuts both ways.

    Once you get that first cut established, your tractors wheels will settle into the ditch and help help keep you on the straight and narrow.

    Don't over-do it...your ditch only has to be a few inches deep to effectively handle the run-off. It is more important that it smoothly pitches downhill, with minimal humps and bumps in the bottom to create turbulence.

    My land drops 6' over the 1200 feet of driveway, and pitches gently towards the driveway, I only ditch the low side of the road and it seems to work just fine this way...even during the wettest part of the rainy season the dirt road remains passable...I have not spread gravel yet as I am waiting for our house to be finished and the heavy vehicle traffic to finish...

    Once the cut has reached a depth you like, you have the problem of that berm of loose earth that will block water from reaching the ditch...so you will have to spread that dirt across the driveway to smoothly crown the road.

    Tho I own a rear blade, which is ideal for spreading the dirt, I am lazy by nature, thus I have found an easier way than changing implements...I acquired a bunch of railroad cross ties a while back, so I chose the straightest and heaviest one and drilled it at each end to accept a chain.

    Now after I pull up the scarifier tooth and return the blade to the 'level" position, I back up to the cross-tie and chain it across the back of the box blade, one side up close but not too tight to the box on the "ditch" side....on the other I leave about 6 feet of slack in the chain...I run the chains thru a pair of holes that are down low on the outer corners of the box so I can lift at least one end of the tie...

    When I drop my wheels in the ditch and lower the box so the cross-tie drags flat on the ground but not so low the blade engages the earth, the angle the cross-tie assumes pushes the dirt towards the middle of the road.

    A few passes and the dirt is smeared smoothly across the driveway and water can run accross quicly without saturating the driving surface.

    Once you have moved the dirt to your satisfaction, stretch out the chains full length and smooth out any ruts caused when the end of the tie dragged along the driveway. Raise the front lip of the tie as needed and that cross-tie leaves a finish on the dirt that my yard rake has trouble matching....

    I will groom my ditch just before the rainy season starts here in my part of Texas...once a year is generally enough.

    Your mileage, will vary...

    I hope this helps!

    Be Safe Out There...

    Terry
    "...As I get older, I find that any day in which my gratitude exceeds my expectations is a good day..."

    ----- Ray Wylie Hubbard, musician



  7. #7
    Platinum Member kneedeep's Avatar
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    Default Re: Scoop pans....are they worth having???

    what he said!!
    PROUD AIR FORCE DAD


  8. #8
    Super Member 94BULLITT's Avatar
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    Default Re: Scoop pans....are they worth having???

    One problem with a scoop pan is there is no down pressure and you need hydraulic toplink to dig with one efficiently. I would use a rear blade or box blade to do ditch work. I have had good luck with using my box blade to clean/redo ditches. A scoop pan is okay if you have loose material to move and you don't have a FEL. You have to tug on a rope to make it trip(dump). I had never heard a scoop pan called a scoop pan til I looked at Everything Attachments website, everyone around here calls them a pond scoop.

    Here is a video of ETA using a box blade to cut a ditch.

  9. #9
    Platinum Member
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    vermont
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    Hurlimann 435, Fordson E27n, Bolens HT-23

    Default Re: Scoop pans....are they worth having???

    Quote Originally Posted by 94BULLITT View Post
    One problem with a scoop pan is there is no down pressure and you need hydraulic toplink to dig with one efficiently. I would use a rear blade or box blade to do ditch work. I have had good luck with using my box blade to clean/redo ditches. A scoop pan is okay if you have loose material to move and you don't have a FEL. You have to tug on a rope to make it trip(dump). I had never heard a scoop pan called a scoop pan til I looked at Everything Attachments website, everyone around here calls them a pond scoop.

    Here is a video of ETA using a box blade to cut a ditch.
    I did dig out a small pond with a scoop and dump. Once you get the top link adjusted to "self feed," You can fill a load in just a few feet of travel. The trip rope combined with the roll over function assured a fast and complete discharge.

    Since "the big dig", I have used the scoop mostly to move fire wood, Sure is nice to unload rounds, and leave them standing. With the scoop off the frame, the frame makes a great logging arch. very easy to get and keep control of any bunch of logs (well here in the N.E., in the N.W. it would be a different story ;-)

  10. #10
    Elite Member
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    Default Re: Scoop pans....are they worth having???

    Quote Originally Posted by CalG View Post
    (well here in the N.E., in the N.W. it would be a different story ;-)
    You would need a pretty big scoop frame.

    -05-4-saw-jpg

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