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  1. #41
    Gold Member
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    NSW Australia
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    Tractors16-600hp Farm & Earthmoving Equip, Trucks etc.

    Default Re: Warm up time

    Quote Originally Posted by dennis52 View Post
    The owners manual for my turbo diesel pick up makes no mention of warming up.
    People I know with diesel pick ups also don't seem to warm them up.
    My question is why do I have to warm up my diesel engined tractor for several minutes but not my diesel engined 4WD pick up ?
    You don't have to warm up/cool down any engine, but it may be prudent to do so with both if you're interested in minimising wear & maximising the longevity of your diesel engine/turbo....it's also a little more critical in an industrial engine.

    As they say, just as "oils ain't oils", all diesel engines are not the same - The characteristics/design of an industrial diesel engine as used in a tractor are quite different from a light automotive modern diesel engine as used in most current Pick Ups/Utes & examples of variances depending on individual comparatives may include:-
    - Power/Torque delivery at lower RPM in a tractor vs a Pick Up (which will delivery peak power at much higher RPM) , together with significant difference in the gearing, the torque multiplier transfer of low gearing in tractors extrapolating into greater engine loading at any given RPM
    - Composite, Ceramic & weight saving materials may be used in a Pick Up engine (e.g Block/Heads/Pistons) vs generally cast/forged construction in an industrial unit
    - Common rail high pressure ECU controlled injection on a Pick Up ( c.15000PSI+) vs low tech c.2000PSI on most tractors currently in use
    - The volume/capacity of oil, coolant & hydraulic fluid to reach operating temperature is far greater in a tractor (on a loading/HP/engine capacity basis) than a Pick Up, together with differences in the cooling system & oil delivery.
    - Tractor engines are generally constructed of modular/rebuildable design many Pick Up engines are not, from individual cylinder heads, wet liners, Nikasil lining, combustion chamber design...etc.. there can be many differences
    - Pollution & Emissions compliance such as Euro Tier 4, catalytis converters, Adblue on Pick Ups not evident on other than the most modern tractors
    - Potentially high tech aids such as electronic auto's, fly by wire throttle, ECU & other driver limiting aids on a Pick Up lacking on most non-current tractors in use
    - The use of a Pick Up is also generally more frequent than a tractor, so in theory a Pick Up engine may never be as "cold" or deviod of lubrication as a seldom used tractor ...etc.

    Consider a diesel commercial truck engine if used on line haul should last between rebuilds (maker/operator/maintenance dependent) c.700,000kms+, a broadacre tractor c.10,000hrs+, even a petrol taxi cab is good for c.400,000kms - the common denominator is all are operated consistently warm for long periods & do not suffer the wear of frequent start up/cold operations.......
    Sure Mr Tojo, Nissan, the bean counters at Ford & GM do not generally put warm up/cool down recommendations in the Pick Up hand books but then I guess their interests are in selling you a new unit rather than making sure your diesel engine lasts well beyond the 3yr/100,000kms warranty period....And for anyone consistently drivng a Pick Up hard from cold you may want to have an oil sample analysed (as it's bound to contain metal) & the engine rebuilt before the warranty expires....

  2. #42
    Veteran Member orezok's Avatar
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    Jan 2004
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    1,251
    Location
    Mojave Desert, CA
    Tractor
    Kubota B7800

    Default Re: Warm up time

    Quote Originally Posted by Soundguy View Post
    i guess you kind of miss the 'emergency' part of emergency generator.

    it HAS to come on immediatly. screaming to life has to have some sort of small negative effect. .. however if you look at an emergency gensets usage lifespan vs say.. a FARM TRACTOR.. the tractor is going to have WAY more engine up time.

    if you screamed both to life 5 times a day.. i bet you might see a reduced lifespan...
    OK, change emergency generator to Fire Engine. Rarely are they pre-heated and 5 times a day to instant full power might be minimal for some.

  3. #43
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
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    Central florida
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    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: Warm up time

    look st their service life.

    I don't see a fire engine running 40 years?

  4. #44
    Silver Member
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    Plymouth, mn
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    Default Re: Warm up time

    There are a LOT of old fire trucks around me. And in Minnesota, most fire trucks are kept plugged in all the time on break away cords. And I believe they get started pretty much as soon as the call comes in and warms up while they put on their gear.

    People that want their gear to last warm it up and get their fluids warmed and moved around. Ever seen oil or hydraulic fluid in cold temps? It's like pushing jello through a straw. On your tractor, It isn't just the engine. It's about warming up the hydro fluid in the transmission, steering box, and 3pt hitch. That hydro pump really doesn't like jello. It wants nice thin, warm fluid.

    But to each his own.

  5. #45
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    Default Re: Warm up time

    And comparing to diesel trucks....I have a Duramax. You should see the computer programming that has gone into getting the truck as warm as possible. Not just the engine, but the transmission mostly. The Duramax has a high idle setting below freezing which kicks up the RPM's and locks a clutch down to force slip in the torque converter. The torque converter will not lock while driving until the Transmission oil is at least 70 degrees.

    Whether idling until warm, or during the first part of driving a cold truck, the Chevy has a lot of warmup routines built into it. Engineers wouldn't put this much effort into it if it didn't help efficiency and longevity.

  6. #46
    Platinum Member bstrom's Avatar
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    Maine
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    kubota b2620

    Default Re: Warm up time

    i usually warm mine up for 5 minutes or so. Maybe even 10 in the winter if it's really cold. I have friends who never warm their kubota L39 up and I mean never. I have seen them start it on the coldest winter days and start working it right away. They have no patience with it at all. They have had it for about 8 or 9 years and it runs like a champ, like a ticking clock. Don't know how many hours are on it. I can say I have ever seen it smoke much either.
    Last edited by bstrom; 11-07-2012 at 12:53 PM.

  7. #47
    Gold Member
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    Queensland Australia
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    Kioti DS4510HS , Kubota B7100

    Default Re: Warm up time

    Thanks MBTTAC for putting together such a thorough response to my question.
    I'm old enough to remember having to always warm up old petrol vehicles so I instinctively allow all my engines to idle and be driven easy for awhile. As you get older and maybe a bit smarter I find you not only get interested in minimising wear & maximising the longevity of your diesel engine/turbo but also your own body. I guess the same wisdom holds for both; and that's why I'm using more machinery, maintaining it better and saving my back.

  8. #48
    Super Star Member
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    Yanceyville, North Carolina
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    Kubota L4400

    Default Re: Warm up time

    The PUPIL who does not surpass his Master, fails his Master.

  9. #49
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
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    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: Warm up time

    a question on that article? why depress the 'gas pedal' to max.

    should the rack not be calling for fuel anyway?

  10. #50
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    Default

    Starting an engine at full throttle sounds a bad idea. You don't want to rev an engine that doesn't have oil circulating yet, but more importantly, fuel and air has to be at the right ratio. Too much fuel and I imaging it would have a cooling effect on the glow plugs. I guess that is why he keeps suggesting to keep reheating the glow plug ( is it a separate switch on a kubota?). Is the fuel system so weak in a kubota that you need the throttle at full on a diesel?

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