Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 46
  1. #31
    Veteran Member D7E's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    2,158
    Location
    manitoba
    Tractor
    Many

    Default Re: Cold weather starting tips

    Quote Originally Posted by john_bud View Post
    28 above ain't cold. Try it at -35F no wind chill.
    And miles out in the bush
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -img_2389-jpg  

  2. #32
    Veteran Member wmonroe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    2,463
    Location
    Southwestern, PA
    Tractor
    1958 Ford 961 Powermaster

    Default Re: Cold weather starting tips

    Nice, we need a cold start video of that dozer firing up.
    Kubota L5240 with loader and backhoe

    1958 Ford 961 Powermaster LP

  3. #33
    New Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    21
    Location
    ontario
    Tractor
    NH Boomer

    Default Re: Cold weather starting tips

    Quote Originally Posted by woodlandfarms View Post
    I am working on a show that we feature mega luxury yachts. 200 footers and above. Talking with the engineers who manage twin turbo, twin supercharged 16 cyl engines ( I am saying this not for the wow, it is wow, but for the final note I am trying to make). They tell me that a cold start procedure takes 2 hours ususally to get 2 engines up and running properly. If they have to do an emergency start, straight crankover, they are required to write an 8 hour use hit in the log (meaning the clock looses 8 hours for every cold start).
    Short-cutting the normal startup procedure, impacts the engines life expectancy to the equivalent 8 hours normal operating wear; makes total sense to me.

    but "twin turbo, twin supercharged 16 cyl engines" ....they don't combine turbo and superchargers on the same engine do they? and what would be the percentage of 2 superchargers. I must be reading this part wrong

  4. #34
    Elite Member woodlandfarms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    4,270
    Location
    Los Angeles / SW Washington
    Tractor
    PowerTrac 1850

    Default Re: Cold weather starting tips

    http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/b...p;goto=newpost

    As for being twin supercharged, I think what it is that to cover 16 cylinder the supers on the Catepillar engine can only cover 8. But yes, Turbos and suppers on 2000+HP Engines. 250 to 500K an engine. I saw two that was hand filed down (the castings were smoothed out) so the engine was glass smooth.
    Power-Trac 1850, grapple, hoe, 90" mower, 72" box blade

  5. #35
    Veteran Member vtsnowedin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    2,107

    Default Re: Cold weather starting tips

    Quote Originally Posted by Egon View Post
    In another time placing a pan of hot ashes under the oil pan was quite common in places with no electricity.
    Ashes? Hardly. the old man would take a 2'x2' pan of blazing hardwood coals from the stove and slide them under the oil pan of a 57 Ford being careful not to pump the accelerator pedal beforehand and risk having gas drip into the pan. When the oil in the oil pan began to snap and pop as the moisture in it began to boil you would take a hoe and pull the pan out, set the choke, pump the gas three times and start her up. Other days when it was above zero he would take a quart of oil in the metal can it came in and set it on the wood stove until it was boiling then pour it into the oil fill port and start her up. Straight 30 weight oil at zero or below poured out of the can like molasses if it poured out at all. We have it soo---oo much better today.

  6. #36
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,360
    Location
    Kansas...USA
    Tractor
    Kubota B2620 (2012)

    Default Re: Cold weather starting tips

    Those metal quart oil cans were great for playing shinny down in the frozen creek. One sure could create some heat doing that. What could be better than that. Oh....for starting engines......I digress.
    Kubota B2620 HST

  7. #37
    Veteran Member Mechanos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,066
    Location
    Roosterville, MO
    Tractor
    JD 955/70A/7 TLB

    Default Re: Cold weather starting tips

    I've used salamander style heaters blowing on the oil pan/engine from a safe distance, shallow pan of carcoal briquettes under the oil pan, shallow pan of burning diesel under the oil pan (not at all recommended... kind of emergency only), high wattage halogen work lights near the engine/oil pan, propane torch on the intake air horn (tip of flame just kissing the air horn and constantly moving). By far the best and most reliable method is a block heater and the above mentioned method were only used when a block heater or power to the block heater was not available.

  8. #38
    Veteran Member MHarryE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    1,486
    Location
    Northeastern Minnesota
    Tractor
    JD 7720; Kubota M135GX, NH TS115A; JD 6230; Kubota L5740

    Default

    If ether is so bad, why does my latest monthly John Deere parts sale mailer have a special price on starting fluid? Did somebody neglect to tell John Deere it will destroy their engines?

    Actually here where -20 to -30 F temps are not uncommon we have not used starting fluid on our newer tractors. They are either put to bed for the winter, sit in a heated garage, or have their block heaters plugged in (you get to know how long to heat each one by the outside temp). Many of the loggers around here don't have the luxury of heating out in the woods so they put quick couplers on their pickup coolant lines and on their feller/butchers & skidders and run the hot truck coolant through the machine's engine to warm them for starting. Thinking of that cold blast of coolant coming back into the truck engine at first makes me think of immediate cracked block but they say it is not a problem. Maybe it is that the flow rate is restricted. And like I mentioned before, several of our tractors and combines have an ether starting aid, thermostatically controlled, standard. All you need to do is remember to keep filled cans, the ones that John Deere has on sale in its parts flyer, installed.
    JD7720; KubotaM135GX; NH TS115A; JD6230; KubotaL5740

  9. #39
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    763
    Location
    Northern, NJ
    Tractor
    Kubota L45

    Default Re: Cold weather starting tips

    Quote Originally Posted by MHarryE View Post
    If ether is so bad, why does my latest monthly John Deere parts sale mailer have a special price on starting fluid? Did somebody neglect to tell John Deere it will destroy their engines?

    Actually here where -20 to -30 F temps are not uncommon we have not used starting fluid on our newer tractors. They are either put to bed for the winter, sit in a heated garage, or have their block heaters plugged in (you get to know how long to heat each one by the outside temp). Many of the loggers around here don't have the luxury of heating out in the woods so they put quick couplers on their pickup coolant lines and on their feller/butchers & skidders and run the hot truck coolant through the machine's engine to warm them for starting. Thinking of that cold blast of coolant coming back into the truck engine at first makes me think of immediate cracked block but they say it is not a problem. Maybe it is that the flow rate is restricted. And like I mentioned before, several of our tractors and combines have an ether starting aid, thermostatically controlled, standard. All you need to do is remember to keep filled cans, the ones that John Deere has on sale in its parts flyer, installed.
    Ether is "fine" IF the machine does NOT have glow plugs.

    ac

  10. #40
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    69
    Location
    Howell, MI
    Tractor
    LS2030H

    Default Re: Cold weather starting tips

    If your running synthetic oil, I cant see how any oil pan/block heater is doing anything for you? The factory plug in heater on my F250 pick up did nothing, or at least nothing I could detect. That truck had a inlet heating element and a common modification was to remove it since it was an air restriction(hp increase). That truck still started fine even with that removed. After break in on my new diesel tractor, Im switching it to synthetic oil and expect no issues with cold starting, but it has glow plugs. As far as fuel additives, are they really needed if your already running the number 2 diesel fuel that is in the pump during cold weather? That is already deluted with kerosene from what Im told, so cant see how adding more is of any bennefit?

    As for the supercharged and turbo charged engines on the boat, this is known as compound boosting and becoming extremely popular even on smaller displacement engines in cars.
    VW's supercharged turbo engine

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Cold weather starting
    By slofr8 in forum Kubota Owning/Operating
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 02-14-2010, 06:12 PM
  2. Cold Weather Starting
    By hondo964 in forum Owning/Operating
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 11-06-2008, 10:52 AM
  3. Cold Weather starting tips
    By john_bud in forum Owning/Operating
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 02-03-2008, 12:17 PM
  4. cold weather starting
    By dcbx1 in forum Kubota Owning/Operating
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 01-28-2007, 11:13 PM
  5. Cold weather tips
    By monte213 in forum Mitsubishi/Satoh
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11-07-2006, 08:44 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2014 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.