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  1. #11
    Super Star Member murphy1244's Avatar
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    Nov 2011
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    16,396
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    Ohio
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    Kioti DK 40-Massey ferguson 135-Ventrac 4500 Diesel

    Default Re: First Tractor Advice = What do I need in my maintenance shed?

    First things first, A Service Manual so you will know what the heck your doing.
    Murph ------------

  2. #12
    Veteran Member vtsnowedin's Avatar
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    Default Re: First Tractor Advice = What do I need in my maintenance shed?

    I'll second the beer fridge but do the work first then reward yourself with a cold one. Works better that way.

  3. #13
    Veteran Member Deere Dude's Avatar
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    Feb 2011
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    1,020
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    Hee Haw He!!, TN
    Tractor
    John Deere 3720

    Default Re: First Tractor Advice = What do I need in my maintenance shed?

    I would get a quality torque wrench to torque the wheels and all the loader bolts. I would put blue locktite on wheel bolts so they don't loosen up on you inadvertantly.

    Consider putting liquid weight in the rear tires before you get it for required extra ballast.

    Rimguard is popular here but don't know what is available for you. As a last resort Calcium Chloride.

    I have a 3720, and rear wheel spacers are a huge plus to the stability of the tractor; probably as important as rear weight. I imagine yours will be the same way.
    JD 3720 with R4s
    X740

  4. #14
    Super Member txdon's Avatar
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    Jul 2003
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    5,901
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    central Texas, Lee County
    Tractor
    Kubota L5030 1947 Farmall A John Deere Z910

    Default Re: First Tractor Advice = What do I need in my maintenance shed?

    A Pressure washer. But wash before you grease so you don't splatter the grease all over.
    TXDon

  5. #15
    Super Member Gary Fowler's Avatar
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    Jun 2008
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    7,232
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    Bismarck Arkansas
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    2009 Kubota RTV 900, 2009 Kubota B26 TLB & 2010 model LS P7010

    Default Re: First Tractor Advice = What do I need in my maintenance shed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Wagtail View Post
    G'day all. As background information (not to boast) I've just bought a JD4105 CUT. Goodies include 300CX loader with 4in1 bucket & pallet fork/bale spike combo, 655 rotary tiller, 1200 slasher and a chain harrow. Nothing has been delivered yet as, living in Tassie, everything has to come from mainland Australia.

    I'm not that mechanically inclined (if the Ute doesn't start in the morning = it's broken), electronics was my trade in the Navy, but I'm learning in my old age. One thing that I like to be is prepared so, with the information provided, can you fine TractorByNet fellows advise me what I should have in my shed to maintain my rig(s). Basic stuff plus 'tricks of the trade' that a newbie needs to have around.

    Let me bask in your wisdom and experience.

    Ta.
    Number one- get a large tool box to hold all your wrenches in an orderly manner. I have two of the rolling chest about chin high and they are both full. Plus I have a couple more chest tool boxes that hold miscellaneous things that I only use occasionally, like oil pumps, come-alongs, spare gloves, air hoses etc. where they can be closed up and kept dust free.
    I couldn't get by without my air compressor for airing up tires, blowing out filters etc. Get one with at least 7CFM per minute @90 psi and at least a 30 gallon tank so it will run the bigger impact guns.
    A pneumatic grease gun or battery powered is almost essential. It is sometimes hard to keep the gun tip on a grease zerk and pump as you need 3 hands. With a pneumatic (my favorite because a good one can be had for less than $30) or battery powered like the Lincoln (about $200) you can hold the tip on the zerk and pump with the other.
    I use my pneumatic impact guns for removing bolts more and more the older I get. Why strain a muscle when I have 1/2" drive for bolts up to 1/2" and a 3/4" drive 650 ft # torque for the larger stuff and anything that the 1/2" impact wont move. Also an air drive 3/8" ratchet is handy for all those bolt together assemblies that you get like unassembled tool boxes.
    I got a complete set of 7/8-2" SAE and 19mm-50mm metric sockets from Harbor Freight that have been very useful for the large nuts and bolts on disk, bush hog and tractor lug bolts. Also got the large diameter combo wrenches to complete my set from 19mm-50mm and 7/8"-2" SAE.
    I have combined my sets of tools so some sizes have 2 or 3 of the same size but I have at least one combo wrench and socket of every size from 5mm up to 50mm and SAE equivalent in inch. I haven't found any bolts larger than that on anything.
    Also a good anvil 60 pounds or more for pounding those bent things back straight
    A 12 pound sledge or larger to persuade things to move when they don't like to
    A 4 pound shop hammer for smaller stuff
    A good pry bar at least 3 or 4 feet in length
    Non Chinese made 6" table vise that you can hold heavy objects with. An old vise is good for this, one that is forged steel and not cast iron is preferable
    A heavy work table to work on and mount the vise on. This could be wood or metal but needs to be heavy and preferable with wheels so you can move it around assuming that you have a concrete floor in your shop.
    A welding machine is indispensable for repairs and building stuff that you maybe cant buy easily. Some folks like the wire feed MIG but I prefer a DC stick machine. Either will do the job but get one in 220volt capable of at least 180 amps and 60% duty cycle at that amperage. Most of your welding will be less than 125 amps so a machine of that size will run continuously at 125. None of the 110v stuff is heavy duty enough for practical repair of heavy steel.
    At least 2ea 4.5" grinders so you can grind with one and brush with the other. I have 4-- one with 1/8" grinding wheel, one with cutoff disc, one with a wire brush and one with a Tigerpaw (36 grit sanding pad) and also a 7" grinder. All but one of them is from Harbor Freight and they all work good.
    At least one good extension cord of 25-50 ft in length to run those grinders and maybe a double or three way splitter to allow plugging in 2 or 3 tools at once.
    An abrasive cut off saw with 14" blade is good for cutting angle and other steel when you don't want to break out the torch
    Alternate to the cut of saw would be a good band saw
    I like oxy-acetylene torch for cutting, brazing and heating. Lots of folks here on TBN prefer plasma torch but to me that is too specialized and is only good for cutting. You cant heat or braze with it and it cost more than a good Victor cutting torch. If you work with stainless steel, aluminum or other alloys that don't cut with a torch a plasma rig might be a good thing to have but I would still keep my oxy/acetylene rig.
    A half inch electric drill motor plus drill bits at minimum. A drill press would be handy also but you can get by with a hand drill in most instances.
    I also like the battery powered drills with the Li-Ion battery packs as they are lighter and more powerful that the other battery powered drills.
    Depending on your needs- a good chainsaw might be needed to keep the forest at bay
    If you get a chainsaw, I would recommend the electric chain saw sharpeners to keep those cutting edges in shape. They are fast and efficient and so much easier than filing. Just get a couple extra chains and keep a spare when you are in the woods so you can change it out if you dull the one on the saw. Sharpen them all up with the electric sharpener and you will never need a file.
    I am sure there are other tools that I cant think of right now, but this is a good start and with this you can fix just about anything

    Oh a good air gauge to check the tractor tires with. Get one that can be used with water filled tires as I am sure you will want to put some ballast in your tractor tires. While getting that air gauge, get one of the adapters to fill your tires with water. I don't think you will have to worry about freezing conditions so plain water would work for you.
    2010 LS P-7010C 20F/20R gear tractor & FEL, 2009 Kubota B 26 TLB, RTV 900 Kubota,17 foot Lund boat with 70HP motor, 2012-20 ft 12k GVW trailer, 2011- 52" Craftsman ZTR mower, 2013 Ferris Zero Turn, 3 weed whackers, pressure washer, leaf blowers, 7 foot bush hog, 8 foot landscape rake , 8 foot 3 PH disc, 2 row cultivator, 350 amp Miller AC/DC welding machine and all the tools needed to keep them all repaired and running.

  6. #16
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,098
    Location
    Erie Pa.
    Tractor
    Montana R4944, Ford Jubilee, Ford 621, Ford 841

    Default Re: First Tractor Advice = What do I need in my maintenance shed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Fowler View Post
    Number one- get a large tool box to hold all your wrenches in an orderly manner. I have two of the rolling chest about chin high and they are both full. Plus I have a couple more chest tool boxes that hold miscellaneous things that I only use occasionally, like oil pumps, come-alongs, spare gloves, air hoses etc. where they can be closed up and kept dust free.
    I couldn't get by without my air compressor for airing up tires, blowing out filters etc. Get one with at least 7CFM per minute @90 psi and at least a 30 gallon tank so it will run the bigger impact guns.
    A pneumatic grease gun or battery powered is almost essential. It is sometimes hard to keep the gun tip on a grease zerk and pump as you need 3 hands. With a pneumatic (my favorite because a good one can be had for less than $30) or battery powered like the Lincoln (about $200) you can hold the tip on the zerk and pump with the other.
    I use my pneumatic impact guns for removing bolts more and more the older I get. Why strain a muscle when I have 1/2" drive for bolts up to 1/2" and a 3/4" drive 650 ft # torque for the larger stuff and anything that the 1/2" impact wont move. Also an air drive 3/8" ratchet is handy for all those bolt together assemblies that you get like unassembled tool boxes.
    I got a complete set of 7/8-2" SAE and 19mm-50mm metric sockets from Harbor Freight that have been very useful for the large nuts and bolts on disk, bush hog and tractor lug bolts. Also got the large diameter combo wrenches to complete my set from 19mm-50mm and 7/8"-2" SAE.
    I have combined my sets of tools so some sizes have 2 or 3 of the same size but I have at least one combo wrench and socket of every size from 5mm up to 50mm and SAE equivalent in inch. I haven't found any bolts larger than that on anything.
    Also a good anvil 60 pounds or more for pounding those bent things back straight
    A 12 pound sledge or larger to persuade things to move when they don't like to
    A 4 pound shop hammer for smaller stuff
    A good pry bar at least 3 or 4 feet in length
    Non Chinese made 6" table vise that you can hold heavy objects with. An old vise is good for this, one that is forged steel and not cast iron is preferable
    A heavy work table to work on and mount the vise on. This could be wood or metal but needs to be heavy and preferable with wheels so you can move it around assuming that you have a concrete floor in your shop.
    A welding machine is indispensable for repairs and building stuff that you maybe cant buy easily. Some folks like the wire feed MIG but I prefer a DC stick machine. Either will do the job but get one in 220volt capable of at least 180 amps and 60% duty cycle at that amperage. Most of your welding will be less than 125 amps so a machine of that size will run continuously at 125. None of the 110v stuff is heavy duty enough for practical repair of heavy steel.
    At least 2ea 4.5" grinders so you can grind with one and brush with the other. I have 4-- one with 1/8" grinding wheel, one with cutoff disc, one with a wire brush and one with a Tigerpaw (36 grit sanding pad) and also a 7" grinder. All but one of them is from Harbor Freight and they all work good.
    At least one good extension cord of 25-50 ft in length to run those grinders and maybe a double or three way splitter to allow plugging in 2 or 3 tools at once.
    An abrasive cut off saw with 14" blade is good for cutting angle and other steel when you don't want to break out the torch
    Alternate to the cut of saw would be a good band saw
    I like oxy-acetylene torch for cutting, brazing and heating. Lots of folks here on TBN prefer plasma torch but to me that is too specialized and is only good for cutting. You cant heat or braze with it and it cost more than a good Victor cutting torch. If you work with stainless steel, aluminum or other alloys that don't cut with a torch a plasma rig might be a good thing to have but I would still keep my oxy/acetylene rig.
    A half inch electric drill motor plus drill bits at minimum. A drill press would be handy also but you can get by with a hand drill in most instances.
    I also like the battery powered drills with the Li-Ion battery packs as they are lighter and more powerful that the other battery powered drills.
    Depending on your needs- a good chainsaw might be needed to keep the forest at bay
    If you get a chainsaw, I would recommend the electric chain saw sharpeners to keep those cutting edges in shape. They are fast and efficient and so much easier than filing. Just get a couple extra chains and keep a spare when you are in the woods so you can change it out if you dull the one on the saw. Sharpen them all up with the electric sharpener and you will never need a file.
    I am sure there are other tools that I cant think of right now, but this is a good start and with this you can fix just about anything

    Oh a good air gauge to check the tractor tires with. Get one that can be used with water filled tires as I am sure you will want to put some ballast in your tractor tires. While getting that air gauge, get one of the adapters to fill your tires with water. I don't think you will have to worry about freezing conditions so plain water would work for you.


    How much thought and time did this take! Very helpful, but I have found it takes a lifetime to acquire an assortment of tools like that or at least that is how long it has taken me!
    Montana R4944
    Ford Jubliee, Ford 841, Ford 621 industrial with FEL & BH

  7. #17
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    699
    Location
    Germanton, NC
    Tractor
    Kubota MX5100F IH McCormick Farmall 140, Massey Ferguson 135

    Default Re: First Tractor Advice = What do I need in my maintenance shed?

    Gary Fowler's advice is good but I agree that it has taken many years to assemble most of the tools he mentions. My collection isn't nearly as extensive.

    Some things have to be added when they are essential to a certain task. Some are good all around tools. One's wallet thickness or thinness may be a factor in the rate of acquisition.

  8. #18
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    1,098
    Location
    Erie Pa.
    Tractor
    Montana R4944, Ford Jubilee, Ford 621, Ford 841

    Default Re: First Tractor Advice = What do I need in my maintenance shed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Summey View Post
    Gary Fowler's advice is good but I agree that it has taken many years to assemble most of the tools he mentions. My collection isn't nearly as extensive.

    Some things have to be added when they are essential to a certain task. Some are good all around tools. One's wallet thickness or thinness may be a factor in the rate of acquisition.
    Well my collection is about the same, and I still have to add specialty items as they are needed for specially tasks. I also need to replace the basic eneryday stuff way more than I like too, my son and his buddies have always had access to the garage and the tools we were all tool buddies and rebuilt many many different engines and what not. The only problem with the whole set-up was that this end of the tool buddy system was the bank, the leader, the supplier, the technical advisor, and pretty much the replacer when things got broken or misplaced (lost)! But after everything they all are 30 +/- years old and I wouldn't change anything, I would and will complain but I would still do it all over again!
    Montana R4944
    Ford Jubliee, Ford 841, Ford 621 industrial with FEL & BH

  9. #19
    Super Member Gary Fowler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    7,232
    Location
    Bismarck Arkansas
    Tractor
    2009 Kubota RTV 900, 2009 Kubota B26 TLB & 2010 model LS P7010

    Default Re: First Tractor Advice = What do I need in my maintenance shed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Guesseral View Post
    How much thought and time did this take! Very helpful, but I have found it takes a lifetime to acquire an assortment of tools like that or at least that is how long it has taken me!
    I just thought about what I have used in the last week or so and started listing them. Of course many of these have been accumulated since I started owning tractors in the last 4 years. My basic tools in 3/8" and 1/2" drive sockets standard 1/4"- 1" and metric equivalent have been with me for many years and most car owners have at least a basic set of these. The larger 1" - 2" I have picked up as I found them on sale, mostly from Harbor Freight. Their large wrenches are pretty good and very well priced and lifetime guarantee. I have found that I don't need the high dollar impacts like Snap-on that professional mechanics use everyday. The Chicago Pneumatic brands are cheap and last a lifetime for average occasional use. My 1/2" drive impact is over 20 years old. I just picked up the 3/4" drive a few months back when HF had it on sale for $69. Same with my large socket sets, they were on sale a couple years ago for $49 each and have sockets, breaker bar, ratchet, and 2 extensions. I couldn't buy the ratchet for that price at Sears. I use those sockets on my impact and so far they are holding up. A set of impact sockets in that size would be super expensive.
    2010 LS P-7010C 20F/20R gear tractor & FEL, 2009 Kubota B 26 TLB, RTV 900 Kubota,17 foot Lund boat with 70HP motor, 2012-20 ft 12k GVW trailer, 2011- 52" Craftsman ZTR mower, 2013 Ferris Zero Turn, 3 weed whackers, pressure washer, leaf blowers, 7 foot bush hog, 8 foot landscape rake , 8 foot 3 PH disc, 2 row cultivator, 350 amp Miller AC/DC welding machine and all the tools needed to keep them all repaired and running.

  10. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
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    25
    Location
    True Norcal
    Tractor
    Branson 3510H

    Default

    I've long held that if I can buy the tools for the cost of having someone else do the repair or less ( usually less), I will buy the tools and learn the skill and be richer for it. We're a ways from suppliers as well and I have never regretted this approach.

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