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  1. #21
    Veteran Member
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    Sep 2009
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    Up State S.C.
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    AC WD 34 hp/3500 lbs MF 261 60 hp/5380 lbs

    Default Re: Observations from North Carolina

    Quote Originally Posted by Xfaxman View Post
    Yep, it has a cab air filter and heat and A/C.

    The view out the windshield while brush hogging
    Attachment 314305 Attachment 314306 Attachment 314307 Attachment 314308
    In another thread, we've been talking about about cutting hay with a rotary mower equiped with a removable side panel. One of the disadvantages of doing this with a tractor is that the tires push down crops with fragile stems. The skid steer mower, with only a pivot wheel in front, should do a much better job of this.

  2. #22
    Veteran Member Dozernut's Avatar
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    South Eastern Illinois
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    Kubota L4610, ZD21, RTV900, B2630

    Default Re: Observations from North Carolina

    Tractors are cheaper than skid steers (especially tracked units) purchase and maintenance wise. We have a small rural county and they use tractors for mowing, grading roads (gravel roads) and some loading and leveling. Cost is the big factor, a small rural county cannot afford many pieces of expensive equipment. They do have dozers, graders, end loaders, dump trucks and other equipment but the tractor uses less fuel and still gets the job done and parts are cheaper. So when they can use a tractor they do.

    About the only difference between here and Appalachia is the terrain. We have rednecks here also (me included) but we are happy and would get along fine with the "good ole boys" from south of the Mason Dixon line. In fact if you look at a map, Southern Illinois is further south than most of Kentucky. When you cross the state line into Kentucky we even sound alike.
    RB

  3. #23
    Super Member farmgirl19's Avatar
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    Mar 2013
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    Texas
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    1986 JD 1050, and 1941 Avery

    Default Re: Observations from North Carolina

    Somehow, I think that would take a little getting used to. (The view, and direction of work, not the A/C in the cab!)
    If man had enough horse sense to treat his wife like a Thoroughbred, she would never grow into an old nag.

    If you're going to climb in the saddle, better be ready for the ride!

    "If you see someone without a smile, give them yours!" - Dolly Parton

  4. #24
    Veteran Member
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    Up State S.C.
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    AC WD 34 hp/3500 lbs MF 261 60 hp/5380 lbs

    Default Re: Observations from North Carolina

    Quote Originally Posted by Dozernut View Post
    About the only difference between here and Appalachia is the terrain. We have rednecks here also (me included) but we are happy and would get along fine with the "good ole boys" from south of the Mason Dixon line. In fact if you look at a map, Southern Illinois is further south than most of Kentucky. When you cross the state line into Kentucky we even sound alike.
    Once when I worked with a lady from somewhere up north. I commented that she sounded like one of us, she said she was from a misplaced southern state. It might have been Illinois, wish I could remember.

  5. #25
    Gold Member BuzzardA91's Avatar
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    West Granby CT
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    JD 4105. 375 Backhoe. 2005 Polaris Ranger

    Default Re: Observations from North Carolina

    One other thing I forgot to mention were the cemeteries. Almost all hat I passed that I could see equipment at was a 30 or so hp tractor with a backhoe to dig the graves. I actually went by while one was being dug. It was a JD3320 with a 375 hoe. I have never seen that in CT. A mini or a 410 or something usually does them from what I have noticed. Maybe it is just a cost thing?

  6. #26
    Super Star Member
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    Northern Fingerlakes region of NY, USA
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    Kubota L3830GST, B7500HST, BX2660

    Default Re: Observations from North Carolina

    Perhaps they had a 410 and went with something smaller when they found the replacement cost...

    Aaron Z
    A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
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  7. #27
    Platinum Member DABSGT's Avatar
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    Connecticut
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    john deeere 855

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    BuzzardA91

    Here in Ct. The cost is passed on to the taxpayer so they get the biggest more expensive tractor.

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  8. #28
    Super Star Member dave1949's Avatar
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    Industry, Maine
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    New Holland TC40

    Default Re: Observations from North Carolina

    Quote Originally Posted by BuzzardA91 View Post
    One other thing I forgot to mention were the cemeteries. Almost all hat I passed that I could see equipment at was a 30 or so hp tractor with a backhoe to dig the graves. I actually went by while one was being dug. It was a JD3320 with a 375 hoe. I have never seen that in CT. A mini or a 410 or something usually does them from what I have noticed. Maybe it is just a cost thing?
    Could be trying to dig a grave in frozen ground with a CUT would be a challenge? Something they don't need to worry about further south.

    In the old days, bodies were left in a chapel/crypt until the ground thawed. The service berry shrub, gets that common name from the idea that when it bloomed, it was time to dig the graves of the dead stored during winter.
    "Those were the days my friend, we thought they'd never end ..."
    When there is a huge solar energy spill, it is called a "nice day"!

  9. #29
    Gold Member BuzzardA91's Avatar
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    356
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    West Granby CT
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    JD 4105. 375 Backhoe. 2005 Polaris Ranger

    Default Re: Observations from North Carolina

    Dave- never thought of the frost, makes sense.

    Dabsgt- you know it, only the best. We are paying for it, no doubt.

  10. #30
    Super Star Member dave1949's Avatar
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    Industry, Maine
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    New Holland TC40

    Default Re: Observations from North Carolina

    It would be a real ha ha to be digging a grave with a CUT and hit a New England worthy boulder at about 4' down. You aren't going to just move over to a better spot, or dig a trench across the cemetery to wrangle the thing out with a small machine.
    "Those were the days my friend, we thought they'd never end ..."
    When there is a huge solar energy spill, it is called a "nice day"!

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