Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1
    Veteran Member Gordon Gould's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    1,957
    Location
    NorthEastern, VT
    Tractor
    Kubota L3010DT, Dresser TD7G Dozer

    Default If You Have a Long Driveway to Maintain ......

    If you have a long driveway to maintain then a Land Plane Grading Scraper with Top and Tilt will certainly help you do it.
    I graded today for the first time this year. It is so enjoyable to use this equipment. Some how I forget over the winter how easy it is to do a good a job.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails If You Have a Long Driveway to Maintain ......-gradedrive1.jpg   If You Have a Long Driveway to Maintain ......-gradedrive2.jpg  
    "If you're not making any mistakes then you're not doing anything"

    L3010DT, Farmi JL290 Winch, ATI Grapple, BearCat 5" Chipper, 6' Rear Blade,
    7' Sickle Bar, 5' Land Plane Grading Scraper, Dresser TD7G Dozer

  2. #2
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    926
    Location
    southwest NH
    Tractor
    Kubota L5240

    Default Re: If You Have a Long Driveway to Maintain ......

    Sweet rig, nice gravel you have there too !
    'Master of a thousand indispensable skills destined to keep him at the poverty level'

    'You can't beat a man at his own trade'

  3. #3
    Elite Member rekees4300's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    2,796
    Location
    Indiana
    Tractor
    JD4300 HST 4WD

    Default Re: If You Have a Long Driveway to Maintain ......

    So that's what a lane looks like without weeds growing in it!

  4. #4
    Silver Member TerryR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    215
    Location
    Boone, NC
    Tractor
    JD 870

    Default Re: If You Have a Long Driveway to Maintain ......

    Can someone help me understand a question that's been bothering me for a while? I see lots of members here who really like the use of land planes or box blades for maintaining gravel driveways. But it seems to me that what either mainly does is move gravel along the length of the driveway, as show by the OP's first photo. That would be good for filling potholes or washboarding, I'd think.

    But that's not my problem. I have a quarter-mile driveway, fairly steep, in the mountains of western North Carolina. Here's a photo of a part of it.

    If You Have a Long Driveway to Maintain ......-driveway.jpg

    My problem is moving the gravel back on the road after it's thrown to the side by traffic or plowing snow. I find an angle blade works well for that, once one learns how to use it. I'm having trouble seeing how a land plane or box blade would work as well. What am I missing?

    Terry

  5. #5
    Veteran Member Gordon Gould's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    1,957
    Location
    NorthEastern, VT
    Tractor
    Kubota L3010DT, Dresser TD7G Dozer

    Default Re: If You Have a Long Driveway to Maintain ......

    Quote Originally Posted by TerryR View Post
    My problem is moving the gravel back on the road after it's thrown to the side by traffic or plowing snow. I find an angle blade works well for that, once one learns how to use it. I'm having trouble seeing how a land plane or box blade would work as well. What am I missing?

    Terry
    You are dead on - not missing a thing. I also use a blade. It is a great road tool. If you want to chage the road contour or move material across the road a blade is the way to go. Just like you said.
    But once the road contour is set you can maintain it very easily with the land plane. The secret is to not allow the contour to get ruined by rain or plowing. In the winter I never plow down to the gravel. I keep the plow up until a solid packed snow road is formed. I actually make the snow road much wider than the gravel. With the solid snow road I don't throw gravel off to the side when I drop the plow. I guess we are lucky we can do that because things freeze up so well here. Handling runoff on a steep road can be tough. It seems some time along the line there is always a storm big enough to cause trouble but if you can get your drainage set for the vast majority of storms you won't have so much blade work to do fixing washed out gravel and the land plane can then become the go-to day in day out road tool.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails If You Have a Long Driveway to Maintain ......-snowcrown.jpg  
    "If you're not making any mistakes then you're not doing anything"

    L3010DT, Farmi JL290 Winch, ATI Grapple, BearCat 5" Chipper, 6' Rear Blade,
    7' Sickle Bar, 5' Land Plane Grading Scraper, Dresser TD7G Dozer

  6. #6
    Elite Member
    Advertiser
    MtnViewRanch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    6,986
    Location
    4000\' mountains of Southern California
    Tractor
    Mahindra 7520, Mahindra 3215HST, Case 580 extendahoe, Case 310 dozer, Parsons trencher, Cat D6,

    Default Re: If You Have a Long Driveway to Maintain ......

    Quote Originally Posted by TerryR View Post
    Can someone help me understand a question that's been bothering me for a while? I see lots of members here who really like the use of land planes or box blades for maintaining gravel driveways. But it seems to me that what either mainly does is move gravel along the length of the driveway, as show by the OP's first photo. That would be good for filling potholes or washboarding, I'd think.

    But that's not my problem. I have a quarter-mile driveway, fairly steep, in the mountains of western North Carolina. Here's a photo of a part of it.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	driveway.jpg 
Views:	520 
Size:	288.7 KB 
ID:	317790

    My problem is moving the gravel back on the road after it's thrown to the side by traffic or plowing snow. I find an angle blade works well for that, once one learns how to use it. I'm having trouble seeing how a land plane or box blade would work as well. What am I missing?

    Terry
    Terry, your drive is long enough that if you can at all afford it, you should get yourself a (LPGB) land plane grader blade. Each implement has it's purpose and excels at what it is designed to do. You need your rear blade to pull gravel back onto your road. But once it is there, it is tough to beat a LPGB for simple maintenance. The other thing that you will find is that the grading time is quite a bit less, and with it taking less time, you find yourself doing it more often. When you do it more often, the road simply never gets bad. So what ends up happening is that you need the other road implements a lot less often than you do now.

    This is what has happened in my circumstances and of course everyone's conditions are different, but sort of like grapples, there are NO BAD ONES
    and everybody seems to be happy with what they have. Zero complaints.

    Just my
    Brian
    Top and Tilt Kits by Fit Rite Hydraulics

  7. #7
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    193
    Location
    Western NY
    Tractor
    BX24

    Default Re: If You Have a Long Driveway to Maintain ......

    I'm fairly new at this, so take my reply with a grain of salt, but I had the same concerns & I too was considering a back blade when I ran across a deal on a York Rake. It had gauge wheels & the price was right, so I thought it was worth a try. I was also concerned that the back blade might be too aggressive in my inexperienced hands & roll out some of the larger rocks that were supporting the edge of the drive.

    I angled it to one side & drove up one side & down the other for a while and to soon looked better than I expected. Because of the flexible tines, the base stayed where it was, & looser stuff redistributed where it
    belongs. Beginners luck I'm sure, not sure if this applies to anyone else's situation.




    Quote Originally Posted by TerryR View Post
    Can someone help me understand a question that's been bothering me for a while? I see lots of members here who really like the use of land planes or box blades for maintaining gravel driveways. But it seems to me that what either mainly does is move gravel along the length of the driveway, as show by the OP's first photo. That would be good for filling potholes or washboarding, I'd think.

    But that's not my problem. I have a quarter-mile driveway, fairly steep, in the mountains of western North Carolina. Here's a photo of a part of it.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	driveway.jpg 
Views:	520 
Size:	288.7 KB 
ID:	317790

    My problem is moving the gravel back on the road after it's thrown to the side by traffic or plowing snow. I find an angle blade works well for that, once one learns how to use it. I'm having trouble seeing how a land plane or box blade would work as well. What am I missing?

    Terry

  8. #8
    Silver Member TerryR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    215
    Location
    Boone, NC
    Tractor
    JD 870

    Default Re: If You Have a Long Driveway to Maintain ......

    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon Gould View Post
    You are dead on - not missing a thing. I also use a blade. It is a great road tool. If you want to chage the road contour or move material across the road a blade is the way to go. Just like you said.
    But once the road contour is set you can maintain it very easily with the land plane. The secret is to not allow the contour to get ruined by rain or plowing. In the winter I never plow down to the gravel. I keep the plow up until a solid packed snow road is formed. I actually make the snow road much wider than the gravel. With the solid snow road I don't throw gravel off to the side when I drop the plow. I guess we are lucky we can do that because things freeze up so well here. Handling runoff on a steep road can be tough. It seems some time along the line there is always a storm big enough to cause trouble but if you can get your drainage set for the vast majority of storms you won't have so much blade work to do fixing washed out gravel and the land plane can then become the go-to day in day out road tool.
    Thanks for the reply, Gordon.

    We are at 3500 ft. so it gets cold enough to snow enough to plow several times most winters. But we are on a long narrow mountain range in the midst of southern lowlands, so we generally get periods with above freezing night-time temps in between. As a result, we often have plowable snow when the ground isn't frozen. But for the same reason we can't leave the snow above the gravel - it thaws enough to freeze to ice, which is a real issue with a drive with an average grade of 14%. As long as there is some gravel poking through the ice we can get up with no problem with 4-wheel drive, but if it gets above the gravel we're done until it melts.

    The result is unless the ground is frozen I can't avoid pushing some gravel off the side as I plow. I suspect the grade also encourages vehicles to throw gravel, especially pickups that don't have or refuse to engage 4-wheel drive. UPS trucks are the worse - they use the little ones with single rear tires here and they really tear up the gravel. We have pretty good ditches, so only rarely does rain runoff carry enough gravel off to clog the ditches.

    Sounds like I've got the right tool for most of what I need to do. I'll have to think about whether a land plane would be a worthwhile addition.

    Terry

  9. #9
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,876
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Tractor
    Bobcat CT225

    Default Re: If You Have a Long Driveway to Maintain ......

    Your question about the box blade matches my experience. A box blade is all I've got for maintaining my driveway, and it is no good at all at pulling the gravel in from the sides. If I had my pick, I would get a landscape rake (a.k.a. york rake) because I think if it was angled 45 degrees inward, it would do a good job of pulling gravel back into the drive without messing up the grass too much. I would worry that a grader/scrape blade would dig into the dirt too much... but maybe not if it was turned backwards or something.

  10. #10
    Silver Member DB Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    151
    Location
    SW, New York
    Tractor
    David Brown 780 Selectomatic, L3800 Kubota, BX2200 Kubota

    Default Re: If You Have a Long Driveway to Maintain ......

    I purchased a Land Plane early this year to be ready for spring. I am very pleased with the results the land plane leaves. As soon as the gravel dried out I attacked my 1000' driveway. In the past I have used Box Blade, Back blade and landscape rake in combination and usually in that order. I have been very pleased with what I could do with those implements. It has definitely been a good learning experience.
    With that said. The land plane seems to pull up gravel and puts it back on top surface, Larger rocks get buried unless there are too many, It smooths out the surface better than ever, and it cuts the time and fuel spent on maintaining the drive a lot. So bottom line I am very happy with my purchase, I do not think it has made me the perfect driveway but in time it will be the best it can be.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Long driveway and home appraisals?
    By jk96 in forum Rural Living
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 12-22-2012, 02:04 AM
  2. Snow Equipment Owning/Operating Plowing your long driveway.
    By Thomas in forum Snow Removal
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 01-15-2011, 01:23 AM
  3. Grading a long driveway
    By jelc in forum Attachments
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 01-17-2009, 07:29 PM
  4. Best Implement to Maintain/Groom Driveway
    By MikeTipton in forum Attachments
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 07-08-2007, 09:05 PM
  5. What implement to maintain gravel driveway?
    By canoetrpr in forum Attachments
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 12-18-2005, 06:06 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2013 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.