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  1. #1
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    523
    Location
    Cape Cod, MA
    Tractor
    JD 4410 eHydro & 430FEL w/ 4N1 bucket & pallet forks

    Default Torque wrench needed?

    Most of the various operating manuals refer to tightening nuts to a specific torque. Does this mean that one should have a torque wrench and do this from time to time? If so, does anyone have a suggestion on what/where to purchase?
    Thanks.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    7,386
    Location
    North East CT
    Tractor
    2003 Kubota BX-22

    Default Re: Torque wrench needed?

    In the old days, we would say tighten it 1/2 turn before the bolt snaps. Today, everything has a torque reference for it. I would suggest that you consider looking on e Bay for a Snap On Torque wrench and get the click type, not the dial indicator. The reason that I like the Snap On unit is that if you have to have it re calibrated, you can always find a Snap On dealer. I have both a Snap On and a old Craftsman that came with a life time guarantee. The guarantee is no longer because Sears will not give any thing more than one year on torque wrenches now. One thing to remember with all click type torque wrenches, is to put it back to "0" before you put it away. Depending on the type of equipment that you are going to use it on, you will need either a 3/8 or 1/2 inch drive wrench. They aren't cheap, but it will last you a lifetime if you take care of your tools. For your use, if it isn't exactly correct, it will be close enough and all the bolts will be set to the same setting. Some might not agree, but the differance between 60 fp (foot pounds) and 65 fp isn't that far apart to create a problem for most applications... The Junkman

  3. #3
    Super Star Member RoyJackson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    18,519
    Location
    Bethel, Vermont
    Tractor
    John Deere 4400 MFWD, Deere 855D UTV, Z920A Zero Turn Mower and assorted implements

    Default Re: Torque wrench needed?

    Torque wrenches aren't that expensive. Any model from Sears (Craftsman) or other reasonbly priced outlet should suffice.

    Although I prefer the "Micrometer Setting" ("Click") type, others on TBN prefer "Dial Indicating" and "Deflecting Beam" types.

    Remember, torque wrenches reduce the potential for overtightening as well as ensuring correct tightness.

  4. #4
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    3,451

    Default Re: Torque wrench needed?

    I wouldn't worry too much about it. I have been working on machinery for 45 years and the only things I have ever needed a torque wrench for was head and intake manifold bolts, (you can feel it, depending on bolt size). However, if you really have to have one, I just picked up a 150# click ratchet from Harbor Freight for $20.

  5. #5
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: Torque wrench needed?

    It sure doesn't hurt to torque bolts to factory spec if you can. I'm not positive, but I think higher grade bolts need to be torqued correctly to meet factory designed failure specs. Again, I'm not positive, but I seem to recall reading or being told that. It would also nice to be able to tell your dealer when in for warranty repair work, "yep, I regularly check bolt torque with a torque wrench, so I know it wasn't an improperly tightened bolt that caused the failure".

    I've got a 15-20 year old craftsman "click type" that I use and it's held up well, but if I were going to replace it, I would probably look for another higher end brand such as proto or snap-on. I used to really like craftman, but I think quality has gone down hill and haven't bought a craftsman tool in years.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    442
    Location
    Tulsa, Oklahoma
    Tractor
    Kubota BX1500

    Default Re: Torque wrench needed?

    I would not recommend a Craftsman torque wrench. I have had two of them and they have both failed with very little use. The first one was replaced free even though it was well out of the one-year warranty, I guess because they could see it still looked like new. When the second one broke the same way they refused to replace it and it would have cost close to $100 to replace it with a similar Craftsman. I drove over to our local Harbor Freight Store and bought a ½” drive 150# click ratchet torque wrench on sale for $12.
    The problem I have had with the Craftsman torque wrenches is teenage boys helping themselves to them and not unlocking the torque-adjusting handle before turning it. This results in the calibration nut inside the plastic handle coming lose. It is an easy matter to retighten the nut but then the calibration is lost, which is the whole point of the tool. I don’t know what the cost of shipping and recalibrating would be but I suspect about double what I paid for the new wrench at Harbor Freight. Then the next time someone unfamiliar with its operation used it I would again have an uncalibrated Craftsman torque wrench. The design of this tool leaves a lot to be desired as far as reliability is concerned and breaks very easily. I plan to use the cheap Harbor Freight wrench as long as it is serviceable then throw it away and buy another.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    46
    Location
    West Central Pa.
    Tractor
    Kubota L3130 HST

    Default ???

    My 1/2 drive torque wrench needs a long extension to reach the wheel lugs on the disk. When I try to torque them the extension starts to twist [img]/forums/images/graemlins/mad.gif[/img]. It is very awkward to handle as well.

    Could I use an impact wrench w/ adj. power? Do the lugs need to be loosened first per the wrench manual?

    Thanks.

    duke.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    445
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Tractor
    JD 855

    Default Re: Torque wrench needed?

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( It is an easy matter to retighten the nut but then the calibration is lost, which is the whole point of the tool. )</font>

    You should be able to get "close enough" with a vise and a spring scale or some weights. Clamp the tip and load the handle until it trips, then note the reading on the scale.

    Torque is defined as a force multiplied by the length of the lever arm. (feet * pounds = ft lbs) The length of the lever arm would be the distance between the center of the drive tip and the place where the scale attaches to the handle.

    You can also create a calibration curve by measuring the actual torque applied to get various settings. The calibration curve will probably turn out to be close to a straight line. If zero is still zero, then this will give you a calibration constant.




  9. #9

    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    7,386
    Location
    North East CT
    Tractor
    2003 Kubota BX-22

    Default Re: ???

    I always apply Never Seize to the lug studs and then install them. When I recheck them, I set the wrench to the original setting and just pull. If it clicks off, I go to the next stud... if it tightens, then I will tighten it till it clicks off... either way, I just continue till I have checked them all. One important thing to remember is to have the wheel "hanging" in the air and not be on the ground......

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