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  1. #41
    Veteran Member motownbrowne's Avatar
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    Dec 2013
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    1,584
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    river falls, wi
    Tractor
    Kubota mx4700 HST, New Holland TC-29D

    Default Re: Logistics of small sawmill operation

    In the manual for my Timberking, it says the best blade lube is a mix of diesel and bar oil. I am not particularly interested in using that combo, but they do say it works the best, and you can reduce lube use by something like 75%. They also say to use pine-sol in your lube if you are using water. I've also thought about adding some windex as a solvent. No harm in increasing flow either. Let us know if you come up with a good solution. Also, thanks for all the pics, you've inspired me to go wrench on my mill and get some milling done one of these days when the mercury crosses 15.
    Kubota mx4700, New Holland TC-29D, '49 Ford 8n

    Mostly I grow vegetables. I get to make firewood too, but not as much as I'd like to. And if I'm really lucky, I get to make some maple syrup.

  2. #42
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    1,907
    Location
    S. W. Virginia
    Tractor
    Kubota B3200, Ford NAA, IH 454D, Case 1845C

    Default Re: Logistics of small sawmill operation

    I might try adding Pine-sol instead of dish detergent, my manual recommends that as well. I'll probably also increase the flow to a steady stream, not just dripping. Windshield washer fluid was on sale today at TSC so I got several jugs as that is what I use in these sub-freezing temps instead of water. Hope to get back to milling tomorrow or Friday. Thanks for everyone's interest/input in this thread, seems to be a popular topic.
    Kubota B3200
    Ford NAA Jubilee
    International 454D
    Case 1845C skid steer
    JD 265

  3. #43
    Super Member bindian's Avatar
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    Feb 2007
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    5,930
    Location
    Willis, Texas
    Tractor
    Mahindra 6520 4WD

    Default Re: Logistics of small sawmill operation

    Hi all,
    I plan on buying a mill within an year or so. I want to build a retirement log home. I have a TLB with a grapple, so moving logs onto the mill will be easy.
    hugs, Brandi

  4. #44
    Platinum Member
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    Aug 2013
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    719
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Tractor
    Yanmar LX410 IHI 35J excavator

    Default Re: Logistics of small sawmill operation

    Woodmizer owner since 1991, and I never use anything but water for blade lube. Tried a couple of things thru the years, didn't seem to make a lick of difference, went back to water.

    Suggestions on your problem:

    1. MORE water. Mine get to loading up like that, I open the valve on the water jug to where it is running LOTS of water. Water is cheap.

    2. You may not have enough set in your blade. Loading on the very tip indicates that. Softwoods like pine require more set, .025-028. The typical out of the box blade is a compromise set of around .017-.019. ( Really hard hardwoods, you would use a lower set.....like .015 )

    3. And yes, the blade MAY well be dull. Hit a few pieces of gravel in the bark or other trash, and you can dull a blade pretty dang quick.

  5. #45
    Elite Member Sodo's Avatar
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    Apr 2012
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    Cascade Mtns of WA state
    Tractor
    Kubota B-series & Mini Excavator

    Default Re: Logistics of small sawmill operation

    Quote Originally Posted by TnAndy View Post
    Woodmizer owner since 1991,
    …...And yes, the blade MAY well be dull. Hit a few pieces of gravel in the bark or other trash, and you can dull a blade pretty dang quick.
    Wow Andy, 1991 was 23 years ago, thats a lot of experience.

    I found that one pass thru bark that has dirt in the bark, it dulls the blade noticeably in that one pass (!) That's another think a new sawmill owner needs to know, A pressure-washer for (for some barks) may be required, or at least a hi-flowing waterhose, or debarker tools.
    Be careful what you wish for, you might get it.

  6. #46
    Platinum Member
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    Aug 2013
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    East Tennessee
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    Yanmar LX410 IHI 35J excavator

    Default Re: Logistics of small sawmill operation

    Quote Originally Posted by Sodo View Post
    Wow Andy, 1991 was 23 years ago, thats a lot of experience.
    I figure I'm somewhere in the 500,000 to million bdft range.



    Quote Originally Posted by Sodo View Post

    I found that one pass thru bark that has dirt in the bark, it dulls the blade noticeably in that one pass (!) That's another think a new sawmill owner needs to know, A pressure-washer for (for some barks) may be required, or at least a hi-flowing waterhose, or debarker tools.
    I do several things....water hose, bark spud, chainsaw de-barker, and the trick I like best: Don't get in a big hurry to saw....let the logs lay there 6 months, and a lot of species, the bark comes off in sheets !

    Also, when skidding out of the woods, I try my best NOT to drag.....either bring it out on the front forks, or if using the skidding winch on the back, skid right up to the winch, then raise the winch as much as possible so only the back foot or so is plowing ground.

  7. #47
    Veteran Member Dozernut's Avatar
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    Apr 2002
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    South Eastern Illinois
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    M5660SU, ZD21, RTV900, B2630

    Default Re: Logistics of small sawmill operation

    I have an LT 30 I bought about 25 years ago. I don't saw as much as I used to (arthritis) but I sure would like to get a hydraulic mill to make it easier on me and hire a couple of Amish boys to off load.

    Verticaltrx, you might just need to increase the flow of the lubricant. You don't say what type of wood you are cutting, hard or soft. For soft woods you want your tooth rake to be 13 degrees and hard woods to be 9 degrees. Using a hardwood blade on a soft gummy pine could produce what your picture showed.

    Also if it has not been mentioned before, paint the ends of your logs. You can use paint or a wax sealer that you can buy. Painting the log ends slows down the drying process as the veins carrying the water in the logs will bleed out of the raw ends. This will cause the ends of the logs to check and you could lose a couple of feet on each end of a valuable log.
    RB

  8. #48
    Veteran Member
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    Dec 2009
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    S. W. Virginia
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    Kubota B3200, Ford NAA, IH 454D, Case 1845C

    Default Re: Logistics of small sawmill operation

    Thanks for the replies. The wood I've been sawing is Eastern White Pine, but I'm almost done with that and I'll be sawing Black Locust and White Oak next. The blades I'm using are the only one the company stocks for my mill, they are a Woodmizer blade but I don't know the specs. If I continue to have trouble I'll look into other blades. I think they might be getting dull, it only seems to happen after cutting about 300bd ft. I'm as careful as I can be keeping my logs clean (carry them out on the forks or log wagon) and any dirty areas I chop off with an axe before milling.
    Kubota B3200
    Ford NAA Jubilee
    International 454D
    Case 1845C skid steer
    JD 265

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