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  1. #21

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    150
    Tractor
    Kubota L35 backhoe, Kubota L35 boxblade, New Holland LS170

    Default Re: Shuttle shift - What is it?

    Clutching is not required for GST except when stopping (clutch then brakes)

  2. #22

    Default Re: Shuttle shift - What is it?

    Hey Bucky, see if this thread helps web page

  3. #23
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    3,047
    Location
    Windham County, Conn
    Tractor
    Ford 2120 , New Holland TN75D, Hitachi UH083LC Excavator

    Default Re: Shuttle shift - What is it?

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( Andy,
    Have you just flicked the shuttle from F/R while at road speeds?

    I haven't tried it with my kubota M6800 that has the hydraulic shuttle. I'd guess that you'd better be wearing your seatbelt if you didn't want to go flying up over the hood. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/blush.gif[/img] [img]/forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif[/img]

    The Kubota manual notes:
    &lt;/font&gt;<font color="blueclass=small">( IMPORTANT: The hydraulic-shuttle lever may be shifted while the tractor is moving slowly. )&lt;/font&gt;

    Basically, if you are operating any faster than LOW range, I figure I'll be doing the good old Clutch-Brake-Shift. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]
    )</font>

    Larry

    I haven't tried it at road speeds (18-19 mph) but I have done it at probably 8-9 mph in the TN. The tractor slows down slowly and then changes direction and then accelerates slowly. No whiplash at all. In my 2120 which is a 1987 I can't do that because it is before they changed to a trans that allows that. Mine is okay below doing loader work but not any faster.

    Andy

  4. #24

    Default Re: Shuttle shift - What is it?

    Maybe this one may help also web page

  5. #25
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    152
    Location
    Eastern suburbs of Pittsburgh
    Tractor
    '03 L3130

    Default Re: Shuttle shift - What is it?

    Thanks kubmech for the sites. Yes, they were a big help!! [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

    I suppose I should have searched the threads, but then I wouldn't rack up the posts to become a veteran! [img]/forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif[/img]

  6. #26
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    8,063
    Location
    Shingle Springs California
    Tractor
    New Holland TC40D

    Default Re: Shuttle shift - What is it?

    I have tried the "steering brakes" on my kubota, with the HST in 2wd. Useless, just useless. I think the double pedals is just a left over artifact from the gear tranny; cheaper to make one brake setup than to have a seperate setup for gear and hst.

    I don't think they care so much about steering brakes on these little compacts since most are 4wd also. Steering brakes don't work so well when in 4wd.

    Also, since most have power steering these days, they turn so easy that the manufacturers must hink folks don't need steering brakes, especially the ones mowing thier front yards [img]/forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif[/img] Where did that rut come from [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif[/img]

  7. #27
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    1,076
    Location
    Cooke County, Texas
    Tractor
    JD4320 with TNT, electric diverter, cruise control and air suspension seat.

    Default Re: Shuttle shift - What is it?

    This is from www.tractorsmart.com:

    "Manual Shift. Also called straight shift. The Massey Ferguson folks, over in England, refer to this as a crash shift gearbox. That's a pretty good name, because that is (more often than not) exactly what occurs when you try to shift on the go. The two gears that you are attempting to mesh are rotating at different speeds, causing that grinding noise you hear. The two most popular styles of manual shift transmissions are the sliding gear, and the collar shift. In the sliding gear style, the gears are splined to the main shaft, and gear selection is made by actually moving the gears, via shift forks, into the appropriate location. For the collar shift style, the gears are built up into a stack. The gears do not slide back and forth. These gears are not "splined" to the main shaft but are free to rotate when not engaged. There is a shift collar in between each gear pair, i.e. 1st &amp; 2nd or 3rd &amp; 4th. This collar is splined to the main shaft, and is the movable component when a speed change is called for. Manual shift transmissions, while not as user-friendly as some of the other types, tend to have cast iron durability.

    Synchro-Shift. Essentially a collar shift transmission, with the addition of synchronizers, which allow for crash-less shifting on the go. In order to achieve a smooth shift, the first thing that must happen is an equalization of rotational speed of the gears that you wish to bring into mesh with each other. This is the chief function of the synchronizer. Let's suppose our transmission is synchronized between 3rd and 4th gears. We'll start out in 3rd gear, and then shift into 4th. As we shift, the first occurrence in the chain of events is that we move the transmission out of 3rd gear, and into neutral. As we continue moving the shift lever towards 4th gear, a brass cone applies friction to 4th gear, increasing or decreasing it's speed to match that of the rotating collar. Once the speeds have equalized, the gears still may not be lined up with each other, so there are little triangular shaped teeth around the outer circumference of the brass cone, which serve to ever so slightly rotate the shift collar teeth and the gear teeth into perfect alignment. This whole process occurs rapidly, usually allowing a straight-through shift, directly out of one gear and into the next. Synchro transmissions range from simple, where only a single pair of gears are synchronized, on up to full synchronization of all speeds, including forward and reverse. Shuttle-Shift, which refers to synchronization between forward and reverse, is a real benefit to have on a tractor that will be used for front loader work. Still a reliable transmission, but a little more subject to failures because of the extra bearings, synchro rings, etc. that are in use. More complex = more potential for failures to occur.

    Power Shift. Has a lot of similarity to the collar shift, in that the gears are in constant mesh. Instead of a sliding coupler, there is a clutch pack, that when energized, causes the selected gear to rotate by locking it to the main shaft. Some, or all, of the speeds in a given transmission may be selected via the power shift method. However it more often the case that only a portion of the speeds are selected in this manner. This usually results in a hybrid, synchro-shift/power shift type of transmission. Power shift gives you the ability to select several different speeds while on the go without having to use the clutch pedal. When everything is working properly, they are really nifty to use. Beware of poor maintenance habits, though. Neglecting to change the transmission oil and filters, as recommended, will result in this transmission biting a big chunk of money out of your wallet.

    Hydrostatic Drive. There is nothing new-fangled about this transmission. It has been around for a long time. Nevertheless, it is among the least understood of all transmission types. It is common for it to be compared with the automatic transmission in an automobile. They are different animals altogether. The only similarity is that they both use oil to transmit power. Tech types describe a hydrostatic transmission as being a variable-displacement hydraulic pump, driving a fixed-displacement hydraulic motor. Now, to the un-initiated, that's a bunch of gobblety-gook. So let's s t r e t c h that explanation out a little bit. Any hydraulic pump's sole purpose in life is to deliver some amount (volume) of fluid to some other device, which in turn moves whatever is attached to that device, causing work to be performed. This can be either through linear motion (as in a hydraulic cylinder), or rotary motion (as in a hydraulic motor). If we want to control how quickly our device moves (or rotates), one way we can do that is to vary the amount of oil that the pump sends to it. If our pump is delivering four gallons a minute, things will happen four times faster than if we only pump one gallon a minute. (Are you with me, so far?) Since we can control our pump's output, we can control the motor's speed. Now, unless we just want to go around in a circle all day long, we've got to figure out how to change directions. No problem. (You knew that, didn't you?) Most hydraulic motors don't care whether they are turned clock-wise or counter-clockwise. (They probably don't even know the difference!) Since a hydrostatic transmission operates in what is called a closed loop system, consisting of the pump and motor units, we simply reverse the direction of flow from the pump, causing the motor to operate in the opposite direction. Oh, by the way, closed loop means that a fixed amount of system oil is trapped, or contained, within the pump/motor circuit. Assume that a certain hydro transmission is of a size that it contains 500 ml of oil within the closed loop. That volume remains constant, never changing regardless of tractor speed or direction. So, for any change that we make in the output volume and/or direction of flow of oil from the pump section, a reaction must occur in the motor section, inducing a corresponding change in motor speed and/or direction. In reality, there is a certain amount of oil that is constantly escaping from and being replenished back into the closed loop section of the transmission. This is because a small amount of oil is allowed to flow all around the various components for lubrication and cooling purposes. The greatest advantage of a hydrostatic transmission is the ability to infinitely vary the ground speed and quickly change directions. It's like having a million speed transmission. If you need a travel speed of 1.200589 MPH, it is available. Another advantage is reliability. This transmission is, by way of design, pretty much self-protecting from operator abuse. Also, on foot pedal controlled transmissions, there is a built in safety factor in that you need only lift your foot from the pedal, to bring the tractor to a controlled stop. The only disadvantage of note is a slight loss of power at the PTO shaft. You must also remember to apply the parking brake should you park the tractor on a slope. Hydrostatic is, by far, the best choice for turf mowing applications or for any tasks that require constant speed and direction changes within a small area.

    Glide Shift. This is a kubota exclusive. It is best described as a manual shift transmission whereby gear selection is achieved without the necessity to operate the tractor's main clutch. It is very similar in design and function to the synchro-shift type. All of the gears in this transmission are synchronized. The major difference is found in the addition of one hydraulic clutch pack and a hydraulic shift cover that is mounted to the side of the transmission housing. Eight speeds are available, with forward and reverse (shuttle) for each speed. Stay with me as we go through a shifting sequence. Let's assume that we are in 2nd gear and wish to shift into 3rd. Without touching the clutch pedal, we simply move the shift lever from 2nd gear position into 3rd gear position. (Boy, that was easy!). What just happened was, we lined up some oil passages in the shift cover to redirect pressurized hydraulic oil to make the shift for us. The first thing that happened was that the hydraulic pressure that was holding the clutch pack squeezed together was allowed to escape, releasing the clutch. This causes the engine to stop driving the transmission. Next, oil (under pressure) is directed to the 2nd gear shift rail cylinder in a manner which places that rail in neutral. Then, oil pressurizes the 3rd gear shift rail cylinder to move 3rd gear into engagement. Oil is then directed to the clutch pack squeezing it together once again, to reconnect engine drive power to the transmission. The actual shift part of the sequence occurs very quickly, taking about 4/10ths of a second. Clutch pack re-engagement, however, is a time-controlled process in order to allow smooth shifting and eliminate jerkiness in the shifting process. Glide shift has been around for several years now with excellent reliability. It is a great choice if you will be doing a lot of front loader work, as well as working in larger fields. Using a front loader can be very hard on main drive clutches. With glide shift the need for manual clutching is eliminated, thus saving wear and tear on the clutch as well as your leg!"

  8. #28
    Veteran Member GreenRules's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    1,463
    Location
    Limerick, Maine
    Tractor
    John Deere 4110, 325,Gt225,, 110, XUV550S4, Kubota L275

    Default Re: Shuttle shift - What is it?

    True. I doubt 1/2 of all the owners of CUTs use the brakes individually. They work great on old timer tractors with narrow front ends though. There is nothing like a narrow front tractor for swinging around at the end of a row; be it cultivating or mowing, or whatever. Just keep your thumbs out from between the steering wheel spokes... OW!!

  9. #29
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    3,047
    Location
    Windham County, Conn
    Tractor
    Ford 2120 , New Holland TN75D, Hitachi UH083LC Excavator

    Default Re: Shuttle shift - What is it?

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( I have tried the "steering brakes" on my kubota, with the HST in 2wd. Useless, just useless. I think the double pedals is just a left over artifact from the gear tranny; cheaper to make one brake setup than to have a seperate setup for gear and hst.

    I don't think they care so much about steering brakes on these little compacts since most are 4wd also. Steering brakes don't work so well when in 4wd.

    Also, since most have power steering these days, they turn so easy that the manufacturers must hink folks don't need steering brakes, especially the ones mowing thier front yards [img]/forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif[/img] Where did that rut come from [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif[/img] )</font>

    I use the "steering brakes" on my 2120 and TN75 all the time whether in 2WD or 4WD. An example is when plowing heavy loads of snow and th efront end tends to wander either down hill or because fo the angled plow. A slight tap on the correct brake an a straight line is easy to maintain. I feel they are essential on all tractors and definately wouldn't buy one without them. It would not matter if I had HST, the split brakes would still get used. BTW, I very rarely use them to turn at the end of rows.

    Andy

  10. #30
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    221
    Location
    Colfax, CA U.S.A.
    Tractor
    Kioti, LK3054XS

    Default Re: Shuttle shift - What is it?

    I cannot imagine having a tractor without "steering brakes" I have been working in a confined area and could not have jockied the tractor around without them. A slight tap on the brakes either way will move the front end much faster than the steering wheel. Especially when you don't have much room to do it.
    Lablovers

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