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  1. #1
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    80
    Location
    DFW, Texas
    Tractor
    Kubota L2800DT

    Default First tractor flat!

    Today I experienced my first flat on my kubota L2800. What a great way to spend the day. First, I let the remaining air out of the tire, put Slime in the flat tire, and discovered that the weight of the tractor had made the tire come loose from the wheel. I never knew I had to JACK the tractor up before putting in the Slime, but now I know!! Now I had to remove the wheel/tire and take it to a tire shop, but they were all closed for the day. Tomorrow I will get it fixed and get my tractor back in service. Still, a bad day on the farm is better than a good day in the city!
    One question---is Slime better/worse than other brands of tire sealer? Any other options I should know about?? How do TBN folks stop/prevent flats on tractors??

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    134
    Location
    Alaska - The Great Land
    Tractor
    JD990

    Default Re: First tractor flat!

    Hi

    I had troubles with the front tires on my JD990 last winter in the cold. The tire bead would leak which caused the tire to spin on the rim.

    I found that putting a generous coat of bead sealer or tire sealer on the bead, inside and out, before airing up fixed the problem. I also made sure the tire pressure was at max inflation for a few days to be sure the seal held.

    I jacked up the tractor, deflated the tire, and cleaned the bead good before applying the sealer.

    Good Luck

    John

  3. #3
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Posts
    951
    Location
    Sierra Foothills, Northern California
    Tractor
    Kubota B7300; JD LX233

    Default Re: First tractor flat!

    Slime is supposed to be one of the better flat fixers out there. I've tried a few, with little luck. However, I did hear a story about a guy around here that used Slime to fill a hole caused by a T post (hard to believe, but who knows?).

    My tires all have tubes in them, even though they are "tubeless". After puncturing them a few times I wound up putting tubes in and then filled 'em with water to load them up (for stability). No freezing where I am and with the tubes I don't have to worry about rusting.

    BTW, if you have to jack up a tire, if it is on the front and you have an FEL that is a pretty handy way to do it. Just don't rely on it to *keep* it off the ground - use jack stands or something along those lines to save you or your axle... [img]/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img]

    My "solution" of tubes in the tires has worked pretty well for me. I don't get flats anywhere near as often as I used to and when I do it is a $12 fix to take the wheel to my local tire shop, have them dismount the tire and tube, patch the tube, and put it all back together. Might be worth a try for you...

  4. #4
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    1,168
    Location
    New Hebron, MS
    Tractor
    MF 1455v 4wd, 1040FEL

    Default Re: First tractor flat!

    I've only had one tire problem with the MF. One of the rears caught a piece of wire and I plugged it when I pulled the wire out.
    We've had so much problem with thorns puncturing the tires on the JD 455 mower that you had to air the tires every time you wanted to use it. I added slime to all 4 tires on it and haven't had a flat or noticeable leak in a year. Don't know about other brands.

  5. #5
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    7,345
    Location
    Northeast, Ohio
    Tractor
    TC-40D SS New Holland

    Default Re: First tractor flat!

    I put Slime in the tires on my last tractor and used it sucessfully for 5 years. When I purchased the TC-40D I decided this time to try Multi-Seal in the tires. We have a lot of thorns on our property and both are good products. I haven't had a flat as a result of thorns in years. It amazes me that I can pull a thorn out of my tire without loss of air.

  6. #6
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    1,421
    Location
    East Texas, USA
    Tractor
    Kubota Grand L4740, B2400 and F2680

    Default Re: First tractor flat!

    Ronbo3, I had to laugh. You were just like me the first time I messed with a flat on a tractor. It brought back memories. For me, fixing flats is probably the most thankless job associated with tractoring. Once that tire comes off the bead, it's a booger to get back on. I've seen all kinds of methods used, including starter fluid, but that's a little too scary, even for me.

    I usually get about a dozen flats a year at the farm. There are lots of locust trees around here. I put tubes in all the tires. At least that way you can get them aired back up. I just used to remove them and take them in to be patched. I never had much faith in sealants but at the end of last year, after advice on this board, I started adding <font color="green"> Slime </font> when I had a puncture. I haven't had a real problem since. My experience hasn't been over a long period of time but it seems to be working well so far.

    So, that would be my advice ... put a tube in it and use the <font color="green"> Slime </font> that's made for tubes.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Posts
    58
    Location
    Queenstown, MD
    Tractor
    JD4710

    Default Re: First tractor flat!

    I too used slime this winter (colder temp = seal loss), "wrapped" the tire with a ratchet strap, took out the valve stem, and let the compressor do the rest -- seems to be holding okay. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img] (Kept the pressure up in the other tires as well!!! [img]/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img])

    JackD

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    134
    Location
    Alaska - The Great Land
    Tractor
    JD990

    Default Re: First tractor flat!

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( "wrapped" the tire with a ratchet strap, took out the valve stem, and let the compressor do the rest

    JackD )</font>

    I did the same with a ratchet strap. I had to laugh when I read your post. I forgot that I had improvised some manner to get the bead close enough to seal when I put the air to it. I used to work at a dealership where we has a constrictor strap that was pumped with air to get the tire to seat. I'm glad the ratchet strap did the trick...

    Sounds like the tire slime does a good job. Will it seal the bead also ??

    John

  9. #9
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    80
    Location
    DFW, Texas
    Tractor
    Kubota L2800DT

    Default Re: First tractor flat!

    I finally got the tire to a tire shop, and what a hoot I had watching these guys put air in it!! I found an allnite tire place in Dallas, and it took 3 guys to get the bead to seal. They were used to working on auto tires, and the big rear tractor tire was a challenge, but they got it done!
    I plan on having all my tires filled with <font color="green"> </font> SLIME <font color="black"> </font> when I go in for the 50hr service. For me, ONE flat on my tractor is enough--I don't want any more. Also, it's gonna be death to all the locust trees I can find. Whatever use God has for them, they can grow someplace else!

  10. #10
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    750
    Location
    NC
    Tractor
    Kioti CK20HST

    Default Re: First tractor flat!

    My grandfather (an old trucker) showed me an old timers way to get a tire to seal, buts its probably dangerous enough to use only in an emergency. I myself have used it once or twice for ATVs back in the woods.

    Note: I am not responsible for the results if anyone tries this and fails.

    1) Get the air hose ready and in position near the tire.
    2) Spray a small amount of starting fluid on and near the bead making sure that a small amount of mist goes inside the tire.
    3) Step back and throw a lit match near that area.
    4) After the explosion (hopefully fully contained by the tire), the tire will be sealed but quickly losing its volume. At this time very quickly hit the valve with the air before it has time to bleed off.

    If done correctly, you will have a slightly warm well sealed tire (and slightly frayed nerves).

    Getut

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