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  1. #1
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    50
    Location
    Maryland

    Default Handling Liquid-Filled Tires

    I just got a 1954 Ford NAA. It runs well, but needs some work. The brake return springs are shot, and I need to take the wheels off to get to them (drum brakes). BUT, I have liquid filled tires! How do I get the wheels off without killing myself, or my wife who I may try to coax into doing the job?

    Thanks [img]/forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif[/img]

  2. #2
    Veteran Member Volfandt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    1,879
    Location
    TN
    Tractor
    2004 Kubota BX23, 1966 WheelHorse 856

    Default Re: Handling Liquid-Filled Tires

    The key is to not let them tip over on their side. They can be a bear to get righted again. BTDT! [img]/forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif[/img]

    What I've done is to break the nuts loose 1st, then raise one side at a time. Raise the tractor just high enough to where the wheel lug nuts are centered in the wheel lug holes. Remove the nuts and then wiggle the wheel out to where it clears the lugs then roll it over and slightly lean it against the wall or similar. Block that side of the tractor up then go at the other side. I did my old TE20's rears like this many times. I had to use a 3/4" breaker bar with a thick walled 4' long pice of galvanized pipe to break the nuts loose! Thats why I recommend to break 'em before you start jacking the tractor up.

    Good Luck
    Volfandt



  3. #3
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    7,345
    Location
    Northeast, Ohio
    Tractor
    TC-40D SS New Holland

    Default Re: Handling Liquid-Filled Tires

    Otis ideally if you have a friend who has a loader on his tractor close by then it's a fairly easy job with a chain and the loader doing all the grunt work.

    TC-40D SS web pictures click here

  4. #4
    Super Member Henro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    5,294
    Location
    Few miles north of Pgh, PA
    Tractor
    Kubota B2910, BX2200, Yardman 20HP pos...

    Default Re: Handling Liquid-Filled Tires

    In addition to what the others have said, I would also put it in my mind that if something goes wrong and the tire starts to fall my way, I am going to jump out of the way and worry about picking it back up later...

    May be a good idea to have a friend around to help the first time, even if he does not have the tractor/loader that PineRidge suggested. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

    It is probably not a big deal to do by yourself...but there is a lot of truth to the old saying "better safe than sorry..."

  5. #5
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    329
    Location
    Fayetteville, Georgia now should be GATC45
    Tractor
    New Holland TC-45D

    Default Re: Handling Liquid-Filled Tires

    Years ago before I had my TC-35 I borrowed my FIL's 1920. While clearing land I punchered one of the rear tires with a small tree stob. It's a bad feeling hearing that hissing sound with anti freeze and water spraying all over you. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/blush.gif[/img] Anyway I got the tractor parked in the barn on concrete before the tire went flat. I went ahead and jacked the tractor using railroad ties as a platform with a bottle jack on top of the platform. I have a small bank close to my barn. I backed my truck up to the bank, rolled the tire up the bank and simply flipped the tire over on the tailgate. Keep in mind this was not so bad due to the tire was now empty of fluid. After the local tire shop repaired the tire the real fun began. Returning home I backed to the bank and managed to wrestle the tire off the tailgate in an upright position. Rolling the tire back to the tractor was pretty tuff. I work as a mechanic for a magor airline and have handled large tires for years, but wresting this thing on gravel was a real chore. I'm 6' 2'' and weigth around 250 lbs. It was all I could do to get the tire back to the tractor. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img] Getting the tire back on the tractor was not too bad. The height adjustment was easy due to the bottle jack, getting the tire rotated to the proper position was the challenge. So I took a piece of half inch electrical conduit and cut it in 6 pieces about one foot long. I laid them out on the floor about 8 inches apart, just under the axle hub. I then laid a 6 foot long piece of 2 x 12 on top of the pipes. Visualize making a see saw, but instead of having a single pivot, you would have the pipes acting as wheels spaced 8 inches apart. I rolled the tire on top of the 2 x 12. I could then slide the 2 x 12 and roll the tire to line up the bolt holes. The pipe and 2 x 12 worked great, it was actually the easiest part of the job.

    Hope this helps. Be careful !

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    435
    Location
    Parker, Colorado
    Tractor
    Kubota B7800

    Default Re: Handling Liquid-Filled Tires

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( .... I could then slide the 2 x 12 and roll the tire to line up the bolt holes. The pipe and 2 x 12 worked great, it was actually the easiest part of the job.

    Hope this helps. Be careful ! )</font>


    Truly ingenious. I know that just moving my little foam-filled fronts around was hard enough on my back. I can't imagine trying to line up the lug holes on a rear. Your solution is simple and effective.


    Thanks

    Mike

  7. #7
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    1,162
    Location
    Upstate NY, USA
    Tractor
    Kubota L3710 HST and a Kubota ZD21 60Pro

    Default Re: Handling Liquid-Filled Tires

    Get a pair of helpers. Even if you have to pay then, it's not worth the risk of injury.

    I've had 2 flats in my rear loaded tires, I called the mobile service for each. The callout was only $40.

  8. #8
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,157

    Default Re: Handling Liquid-Filled Tires

    get an engine crane - basically it will do the hard work so you dont have to - may cost a bit but youll have it for life [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

  9. #9
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    305
    Location
    Northwest GA USA
    Tractor
    Kubota L3710DT & Yanmar 186D

    Default Re: Handling Liquid-Filled Tires

    We (the more the better) have also done it with a 16hp Mitsubishi and a three point carryall for a loaded rear off a kubota L3130HST. The additional tractor takes most of the grunt work out of it, though.

    Jeff

  10. #10
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    50
    Location
    Maryland

    Default Re: Handling Liquid-Filled Tires

    Thanks to evryone on answering the mail. I now have more trickes in my mental tool kit. I do have another tractor, so the carryall makes sense. But I really like the engine hoist and the conduit ideas as well. I now have an excuse to buy a hoist AND pave a spot so the hoist or the conduit can roll.
    OrtisEvans

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