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  1. #1

    Default Tractor Flat Prevention Options

    In response to a reply I made to another post I decided to start a new thread, so everyone would see it. When I was having so much trouble with flats on my tractors, I did a little digging and this is some of what I found on other tractor forums.
    Anti-flat foam, a popular and inexpensive motorist's emergency item available in aerosol cans, can also be used to temporarily fill tractor tires. Like anti-flat liquid, this foam does not prevent punctures but helps stop air leaks afterwards. Some people rely on this treatment as a permanent solution for flat tractor tires. Unfortunately, over several months the foam breaks down, losing its puncture sealing qualities and creating a sticky mess that has to be cleaned out of the tires eventually.
    Urethane foam can be substituted for air in a tractor tire. Foam is available in several densities which approximate different inflation pressures. Once the foam sets, the tire is truly puncture proof. This is popular with construction equipment, but useful for small tractors, as well. It is expensive: $40 or more for a small tire. Foam-filled tires are several times heavier than air-filled tires. Foam-filled tires are harder on a tractor's steering mechanism than air-filled tires, since there is less "give" to the foam. For the same reason, foam-filled tires tend to create dents and ruts in the ground. Finally, foam filling does not make a thin tire stronger; in fact, it may put more stress on a light duty tire than it was designed to withstand -- resulting in a shredded tire with nothing to support the foam. So, this process is recommended only for heavy duty tires. Most industrial tire dealers provide this service.
    An anti-flat liquid which resembles a thick syrup can be added to tires to slow or stop air loss from small punctures. This solution coats the inside of the tire or inner tube as the tractor moves and clogs up air leaks. Although this treatment does nothing to make tires puncture resistant, it can keep small punctures from causing tires to go flat. Unfortunately, since the solution does not completely fill the tire's inside, as the tractor sits for awhile the syrup drains to the bottom of the tire and previously sealed punctures can reopen.
    Used aircraft tires, with 16 to 34 or more plies, can be found in sizes that fit many small tractors. These usually have ribbed tread, are very heavily constructed and offer excellent puncture resistance. Since they have no traction, these tires are best used for implements, wagons and as front tires on tractors. One US source for aircraft tires is GENSCO Aircraft Tires of Houston.
    Patented polyurethane liquid -- shipped from Arnco in large drums or bulk containers known as “totes” and is available in four different polyurethane formulations, is pumped into the tire through its valve stem by an Certified Dealer, replacing all of the air in the tire, and cures into a resilient, synthetic rubber-like core in 24 hours. It completely eliminates flats, blowouts or other damage that can occur from nails, glass or sharp objects with air-filled tires, and works in any tire with a sound casing. Each tire and wheel is inspected for defects and the carcass is pre-stretched overnight before the tire is filled. The tire is pressurized to the recommended inflation pressure and the curing process (to a soft rubber-like material) is performed at the proper time and temperature to insure optimum filled tire performance.
    The reusable R.L will bring extended tire life, better traction, and improved tire stability to your operation, resulting in a lower cost per hour of operation. The amount of reuses will depend upon the severity of your operation. But unlike the alternatives such as solid resilient or polyurethane-filled tires, the R.L. will be manufactured to match your tire's profile. To further enhance quality and durability, an advanced automation system specifies each R.L. (rubber liner) to meet the psi and load requirements for your vehicle as specified by the tire manufacturer. The R.L. for your vehicles will be custom manufactured for your specific tire profile and load requirements. The R.L.s will be inserted into the tires and mounted on your flat base wheels or rims. The unique honeycomb structure of the R.L. allows pneumatic tire flexibility, cushioning vehicles, drivers and their payloads. The Hutchinson R.L. maintains its shape and tensile strength for the life of the tire.
    These appear to be made in Australia and may not be available in the USA. At least no one in my area had hear of them.
    I found a number of tires shops that filled tires, but only one that could tell me what he was putting in them, so I choose him.
    JD
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2

    Default Re: Tractor Flat Prevention Options

    another phot of the rubber liner, looks like a good idea.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #3
    Elite Member Cliff_Johns's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tractor Flat Prevention Options

    Very thorough analysis. Thanks for taking the time to do this. I don't have a problem with flats right now, (fingers crossed), but when I do, I will go back and reread this thread.

    I am a bit curious about the idea of increased wear on the steering systems from foam in the front tires. I had not heard this, and I admit it sounds unlikely with a light CUT, although I could see it in larger, heavier machines. I wonder how much the size of the machine the tires are on contributes to the characteristics of the techniques listed.

    Cliff

  4. #4
    Elite Member thcri's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tractor Flat Prevention Options

    Cliff, If I remember right I think Henro put foam in his tires. Maybe drop him a line and ask him how he likes it. I personally only have had one problem but the next time around I just may put the foam in.

    murph

  5. #5
    Super Member Henro's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tractor Flat Prevention Options

    JD3130,

    Great summary which will certainly be helpful to others here at TBN, now and in the future.

    You are right on with respect to weight and cost for the 2-part foam. The fronts for my BX, which are actually a pretty small tire, cost $38 each to foam fill, not including sales tax. I easily carried them into the tie shop, one in each hand. A couple days later, I only wanted to carry one at a time back out the door. I think the weight of the tires went up to 58 lbs each. They were pretty light on the way into the shop, but I did not weigh them before they were filled.

    Cliff, I think the manuals for both my kubota tractors say not to load the front tires. And if I remember right the reason given is added stress due to the heavier tire weight. I can see there has to be some added stress, but I can't imagine the extra weight making THAT much difference. But even rear tires have similar issues if I remember correctly. Some manufacturers say either load the rear tires or use wheel weights, but NOT BOTH. Yet I could load my rear tires and hang a backhoe on the back of my tractor, which weighs a lot more than wheel weights, and which weight the tractor axles/bearings must carry totally... [img]/forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif[/img]

    Murf, you are correct. I have that better grade foam in the front tires on both tractors and I am quite satisfied with it. Price and lack of rear punctures is what kept me from putting it in the rear tires... [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

  6. #6

    Default Re: Tractor Flat Prevention Options

    A bit more info. I've had these on my stuff for years and have had no problems at all. The oldest are near to 12yr.
    Couldn't afford them on my big tractors so I use aircraft tires which have proved just as good and a lot cheaper, in the large sizes.
    Jan 2005 prices for the good grade of fill for an 8N Ford here in SA. rear tires 10x28 =$340.20 and add a weigh of 324lb.
    ft tires 400x19 = $38.85 and weigh of 37lb. They charge $1.05 a lb to fill a tire. (no tax if it is for farm use)

    http://www.arnconet.com/

    I ask him about the problem of the tire slipping on the rim. He told me it shouldn't have happen, that either the installer used a tire that had the slime used in it, which they are not suppose to accept. Or it wasn't allow to cure long enough. But in either case the warranty would have covered it. Of course this don't help the guy that rented it!
    JD

  7. #7
    Veteran Member
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    Kubota L3710, Ford 5600, Case MB4/94, Kubota B6200

    Default Re: Tractor Flat Prevention Options

    I had the Ag tires on my L3710 filled through the dealer by a shop that loaded them with high density foam before I took delivery. Needless to say, I've never had a flat and I've run the tractor over areas with all kinds of partially buried metal stuff.

    I may use the tractor to cleanup a junkyard this spring. I'd never use my other tractors to do that. I have no idea what the tires weigh, but one of the dealer's employees had one of the tires get away from him and ended up trapped in a corner by the tire. It took two guys to get the tire off him.

    Other than the lead oxide they used to put in tires, I don't think you can get a heavier ballast.


  8. #8
    Elite Member thcri's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tractor Flat Prevention Options

    Henro,

    Did you get a chance to watch the Eagles ripe the Vikings apart yesterday? I watched the first two series and said, Well looks like the Eagles are on their way to the Superbowl!


    murph

  9. #9

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    Default Re: Tractor Flat Prevention Options

    Ride-On Tire Protection System (TPS)
    http://www.ride-on.com/

    http://www.ride-on.com/offroad.htm

    The Off-Road formula is an industrial strength formula that will seal punctures from objects up to 3/8" (9.53 mm) in diameter that enter the tread area of a tire.

    The Off-Road formula is ideal for farm tractors, lawn mowers, forklifts, backhoes, mining and logging equipment and other industrial and commercial vehicles..


  10. #10
    Super Star Member Egon's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tractor Flat Prevention Options

    Filled tires of years ago. Chances are they will not go flat.

    Egon

    [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]
    Last edited by Egon; 09-04-2006 at 05:59 AM.

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