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  1. #1
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    90
    Location
    Lysander NY

    Default Loaded tires question.

    Hello all, I'm new to this forum though been reading thru many topics for a short while.

    I just picked up new to me a JD4100 with 247 hours on it, that has Ag tires that are loaded with antifreeze (as told by previous owner) to help ballast the JD410 FEL. My question is, assuming I don't wear out the tires for a long time, is there a time frame where it's recommended to have the tires drained or the antifreeze changed? TIA [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

  2. #2
    Super Star Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    12,083
    Location
    Upper Midwest USA
    Tractor
    JD 4300, JD X485 JD 4x2 Gator, JD 425, JD455

    Default Re: Loaded tires question.

    Never heard of Antifreeze going bad.

    As long as it maintains its 'weight' and doesn't freeze, seems it would do its job.

  3. #3
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    90
    Location
    Lysander NY

    Default Re: Loaded tires question.

    That sounds great. I figured I'd ask just to be safe [img]/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif[/img] Thanks.

  4. #4
    Banned
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    719
    Location
    Falling Waters, WV
    Tractor
    Kubota BX23

    Default Re: Loaded tires question.

    The good thing about having the tires filled with antifreeze is now you dont have to change the air every season either. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

    Just messin with you. Welcome aboard.

  5. #5
    Super Member RobS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Posts
    6,240
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Tractor
    John Deere 790

    Default Re: Loaded tires question.

    You should be good to go for your lifetime plus some. Antifreeze in tires won't break down like it does in an engine. There are no heat/cool cycles in the tires.

    One thing you will want to watch is if you get a leak. Antifreeze can be deadly to animals if they ingest it.

    Other than that, enjoy your new to you tractor [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

  6. #6
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    90
    Location
    Lysander NY

    Default Re: Loaded tires question.

    Thanks guys. I'll check this off as something I won't have to worry about until I need to replace the tires down the road.
    Cheers!

  7. #7
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    263
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Tractor
    John Deere 2305

    Default Re: Loaded tires question.

    Bummer, You mean I don't have to rotate the air in my tires each month. I've built these air chuck transfer hoses for nothing.


  8. #8
    Banned
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    719
    Location
    Falling Waters, WV
    Tractor
    Kubota BX23

    Default Re: Loaded tires question.

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( Bummer, You mean I don't have to rotate the air in my tires each month. I've built these air chuck transfer hoses for nothing.

    )</font>

    Where do you keep the excess air when rotating it from rear to front?

  9. #9
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    263
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Tractor
    John Deere 2305

    Default Re: Loaded tires question.

    I don't keep it. I transfer it. You need wheels with dual valve stems 180 degrees oposite each other. You need two 20 foot air lines with locking chucks. One line has inserted into it one air pump, one sight glass and one dye injector. Hook up a line to each valve stem and turn on the pump and dye injector. When you see dye in the sight glass before the pump (the dye injector is after the pump), you're done; the air has been moved.

    [img]/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img] [img]/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img] [img]/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img] [img]/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img]

  10. #10
    Banned
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    719
    Location
    Falling Waters, WV
    Tractor
    Kubota BX23

    Default Re: Loaded tires question.

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( I don't keep it. I transfer it. You need wheels with dual valve stems 180 degrees oposite each other. You need two 20 foot air lines with locking chucks. One line has inserted into it one air pump, one sight glass and one dye injector. Hook up a line to each valve stem and turn on the pump and dye injector. When you see dye in the sight glass before the pump (the dye injector is after the pump), you're done; the air has been moved.

    [img]/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img] [img]/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img] [img]/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img] [img]/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img] )</font>

    How do you address the problem of differential pressure between the rear bleeder valve and the diagonal dye injection pump outlet feeder. It would seem that the lesser of the two pressures would be less than the minimum allowable residual pressure, but obviously, only when the locking chuck valves have been released does this really matter.

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