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  1. #1
    Gold Member Jibber's Avatar
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    Feb 2003
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    324
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    RD-13, Putnam County, New York
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    Kubota L3130HST 4WD, BX2350

    Default Sidebar to previous post on loaded tires..

    OK.. I had a problem detailed in the previous post on loaded tires. In fixing the problem a quantity of Calcium Chloride solution sprayed from my loaded tires in all directions with great gusto over the rear innerds of my tractor. Once I had repaired the valves I gave the tractor an extended bath.. got soap into what areas I could working around the backhoe and sprayed a lot of water everywhere I could.

    Now my brother says I probably have still left enough of a salt deposit that it will cause rust on the tractor.

    I did hose everything off as well as I could.. Is this solution used in tires so strong as to leave a potentially corrosive residue on areas I was not able to actually scrub off with soap??

    I'd hate my baby to get a coat of orange that it didn't come with.

    Any advice? I'm thinking of using up a can of WD-40 hoping to displace any residue..

  2. #2
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    201
    Location
    Erie, PA
    Tractor
    Kubota B2650

    Default Re: Sidebar to previous post on loaded tires..

    If there is any CaCl left on the thing, it'll show up as white residue once it dries.

    If you don't see any white residue, you're fine. CaCl dissolves really well in water, so it comes off easy.

    WD-40 is a water displacement (that's what the WD stands for).

    If you spray the tractor with WD-40, make sure you use a LOT of soap and water to get the WD-40 off, and then grease all the zerks again.

    WD-40 is not just great at water displacement, it is an excellent dust attracter.

    I've punctured CaCl filled rears before and the tractor and I had a nice bath in the stuff. Just wash it off and you and the tractor are good to go.

  3. #3
    Gold Member Jibber's Avatar
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    Feb 2003
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    RD-13, Putnam County, New York
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    Kubota L3130HST 4WD, BX2350

    Default Re: Sidebar to previous post on loaded tires..

    You're right about WD-40 attracting dust.. but I guess I'd rather have dust than rust! I sprayed some areas around where the gushers hit.. now I'll let it set a day or so and then give it another bath. I didn't notice any white residue when it dried.

    I figure the way they salt the roads around here.. the car gets enough of a salt water bath every day.. and it comes off. Of course.. most of the road salt used here is probably Sodium Chloride..instead of Calcium Chloride.. I have no idea what the difference is .. both are basically salt right?

    I should have paid attention in chemistry class.


  4. #4
    Veteran Member daTeacha's Avatar
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    Oct 2005
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    Funk, Ohio

    Default Re: Sidebar to previous post on loaded tires..

    A salt is a metal combined ionically with a non-metal. Specifically, the non-metals of group 17 on the periodic table, the Halogens, are salt formers because they combine so readily with the metals. Sodium Chloride is NaCl in a 1:1 ration. Calcium is a group 2 element as opposed to sodium being in group 1. It combines with chlorine as CaCl2. Both are salts, both dissolve readily in water to make a solution which will cause oxidation or rusting of iron and most of the iron alloys commonly known as steel. So called stainless steel is actually stain resistant steel and will rust if left in a moist environment after exposure to halide salts. It just takes longer.

    Sodium chloride is commonly used to remove snow and ice from roads due to it's relative abundance and low cost. It becomes essentially ineffective at less than 15F, and actually will freeze at 0. The temperature of rock salt and crushed ice is 0 F, half the basis for the Fahrenheit temperature scale. The other end started out at 100, just like the celsius scale, and was supposed to represent human body temperature, but apparently Fahrenheit had a fever that day.

    Calcium chloride is also used to melt snow and ice, and is commonly sold for home use in the form of small white pellets that look a lot like mixed lead shot. It melts snow and ice when sodium chloride is no longer effective.

    Both can be applied in solution from tank trucks, often as a pretreatment when freezing precipitation is expected.

    CaCl2 is sometimes used in summer on dirt roads because it is hygroscopic, drawing water from the air and moistening the road, keeping the dust down.

    Anything else?

  5. #5
    Elite Member Gatorboy's Avatar
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    Aug 2001
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    3,099
    Location
    Bel Air, MD
    Tractor
    Kubota M8950, Bobcat 873 SSL & Kubota ZD-331

    Default Re: Sidebar to previous post on loaded tires..

    I assume you are referring to this thread.

  6. #6
    Gold Member Jibber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    324
    Location
    RD-13, Putnam County, New York
    Tractor
    Kubota L3130HST 4WD, BX2350

    Default Re: Sidebar to previous post on loaded tires..

    Wow, now I know how you got your handle there!

    both rust. I guess that's the key. Something I'd like to avoid in the near future with this tractor.

  7. #7
    Veteran Member daTeacha's Avatar
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    Funk, Ohio

    Default Re: Sidebar to previous post on loaded tires..

    It's what I do for a living.

  8. #8
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    201
    Location
    Erie, PA
    Tractor
    Kubota B2650

    Default Re: Sidebar to previous post on loaded tires..

    You are pedantic for a living?

    Where do you get a job like that?

  9. #9
    Super Member
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    Sep 2000
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    6,553

    Default Re: Sidebar to previous post on loaded tires..

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( Blah blah blah {snip}
    Anything else? )</font>

    You didn't talk about electron sharing, filling valence shells, exothermic reaction due to heat of solvation, lattice energy, conjugate bases of weak acids, or the impact on the mho reading of the water as the salt goes into solution. Geez, no mention of whether the preferred reaction is to FeO or Fe2O3.

    [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] Just yank'n your chain! [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

    jb

  10. #10
    Veteran Member daTeacha's Avatar
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    Funk, Ohio

    Default Re: Sidebar to previous post on loaded tires..

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( You are pedantic for a living? )</font>

    [img]/forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif[/img] Not quite, but there are people I know who swing back and forth between sides of an issue on a regular basis. Them I would call pedantic, or perhaps pendulous. Maybe even politicians. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

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