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  1. #1
    Veteran Member GeneD14's Avatar
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    Southern Indiana
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    Kubota M95s, Allis Chalmers 185 & D17 series IV, Kubota ZG-23 Mower, Kawasaki Mule 610

    Default Tiller Killed Tractor

    Last weekend I was using my roto-tiller to help a neighbor put in a new 2 acre lawn. Up to this point tilling the hard clay soil about 3 inches deep hadn't even been loading the engine. Everything was going great: radio on, AC on, making quick progress. Then suddenly the something killed the engine. I was scared that something really bad had happened. I got out and looked at the tiller, pto, and tractor and couldn't see anything. So I restarted the tractor and raised the tiller our of the ground to check for any big rocks or big roots. When I pulled forward I got a surpise: I saw a bent piece of steel laying in the dirt. I got back out for a closer look and realized that it was the skid plate off the tiller.
    Here is a picture of what it is supposed to look like.
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    Last edited by GeneD14; 06-23-2006 at 09:22 AM.

  2. #2
    Platinum Member
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    Oct 2004
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    721
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    Boerne, Texas
    Tractor
    Kubota M9000

    Default Re: Tiller Killed Tractor

    Gene, Wheres the action picture or the after picture, that skid plate must be a beauty now. Hope your day improves
    Steve

  3. #3
    Veteran Member GeneD14's Avatar
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    Kubota M95s, Allis Chalmers 185 & D17 series IV, Kubota ZG-23 Mower, Kawasaki Mule 610

    Default Re: Tiller Killed Tractor

    The slip clutch on the pto must be set to tight because it never slipped. Luckily the pto shaft, universals, and tractor were ok. I looked at the tines and they appeared un-effected. So I was able to finish the job.
    The steel skid plate was bent by the tiller like it was rubber. It is about 20" long, 1/2" thick and 2.3" wide.
    Here is a picture of the bent up steel shoe.
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    Last edited by GeneD14; 06-23-2006 at 09:25 AM.

  4. #4
    Veteran Member GeneD14's Avatar
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    Kubota M95s, Allis Chalmers 185 & D17 series IV, Kubota ZG-23 Mower, Kawasaki Mule 610

    Default Re: Tiller Killed Tractor

    It appears that one bolt worked loose and the other got sheared off when the skid plate started to bend.
    I wanted to make a new plate but I looked through my scrap steel and didn't have anything close to the size I needed. So I tried to un-bend the old one so I could use it until I was able to fabricate a more permanent fix.
    When I straightened the old one out I drilled out the holes for bigger bolts and torqued them down really good.
    Here is a picture of the temporary fix.
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  5. #5
    Platinum Member
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    Boerne, Texas
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    Kubota M9000

    Default Re: Tiller Killed Tractor

    Gene, I was just to quick for ya and got between your post, I don't know why the old unbent shoe won't work fine its maybe not as pretty as before but it is a tiller and its bound to get uglier as time goes by from what I understand they are abusive of themselves and the tractor when used in rocky or hard clay ground. I'd try it that way for a while and see if anything rears its head but I bet your fix is as good as needed.
    Steve

  6. #6
    Veteran Member GeneD14's Avatar
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    Kubota M95s, Allis Chalmers 185 & D17 series IV, Kubota ZG-23 Mower, Kawasaki Mule 610

    Default Re: Tiller Killed Tractor

    Steve,
    Thanks for the advise. I was tilling hard clay ground with lots of softball sized rocks and the tiller was taking one **** of a beating. It is amazing that nothing else worked loose. You are probabily right, I should leave the repaired shoe on and just use it. Tilling isn't about being pretty. I should have taken a picture of the tractor and tiller when I was done with the yard. It was covered with a heavy layer of dust and looked more brown than orange.
    Thanks again,

  7. #7
    Super Member scott_vt's Avatar
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    east wells,vt
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    1986 MF 1040, 1942 Farmall A, 1949 Farmall Super A

    Default Re: Tiller Killed Tractor

    Mornin Gene,
    Sometimes bad things happen even when your doing good for others Glad nothing worse than that happened !!!

    Last year I was bushogging a section of my neighbors 30 acre field that is too wet for the farmer to bale and remember the feeling when my tractor started to break through the sod and start sinking Thank goodness for FWD Keep up the good work !!!
    scotty

    ,,,course,,it is gas,and gas is,,well,gas,,so,,but it kills the @#$$ oughta them yellow jackets,,,thingy

    http://www.tractorbynet.com/content/...onth-scott_vt/

  8. #8
    Member donaldprice's Avatar
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    Dec 2005
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    44
    Location
    Ky
    Tractor
    Montana 3440 HST

    Default Re: Tiller Killed Tractor

    I though us old boys in ky had that problem with rocks
    If your wife don't find you handsome she should find you useful.

  9. #9
    Veteran Member GeneD14's Avatar
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    Kubota M95s, Allis Chalmers 185 & D17 series IV, Kubota ZG-23 Mower, Kawasaki Mule 610

    Default Re: Tiller Killed Tractor

    Quote Originally Posted by donaldprice
    I though us old boys in ky had that problem with rocks
    I grew up in NW IN and rarely ever saw a rock in the yard. About 10 years ago we built a new house in MI and put in our own yard. I was overwhelmed by the amount of rock! We picked up a truck load of rock by hand before we planted grass seed. When we finally thought that we were all done it would rain and expose thousands more that we never saw before. So we went back out and started picking up rocks again. This happened 3 times before we were through. That first year we grew more rocks than grass.

  10. #10
    Super Member flusher's Avatar
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    Northern California-Tehama Co.
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    2008 Mahindra 5525, 1964 MF-135 diesel, 1951 Farmall Super A, 1951 Minneapolis Moline BF, 1945 Oliver 60 Row Crop, 1949 JD B widefront

    Default Re: Tiller Killed Tractor

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneD14
    Last weekend I was using my roto-tiller to help a neighbor put in a new 2 acre lawn. Up to this point tilling the hard clay soil about 3 inches deep hadn't even been loading the engine. Everything was going great: radio on, AC on, making quick progress. Then suddenly the something killed the engine. I was scared that something really bad had happened. I got out and looked at the tiller, pto, and tractor and couldn't see anything. So I restarted the tractor and raised the tiller our of the ground to check for any big rocks or big roots. When I pulled forward I got a surpise: I saw a bent piece of steel laying in the dirt. I got back out for a closer look and realized that it was the skid plate off the tiller.
    Here is a picture of what it is supposed to look like.

    I have a 4-ft Yanmar RS1200 rototiller for my 21-hp kubota B7510HST. Since the tiller doesn't appear to have a shear pin anywhere, I bought one of those Weasler slip clutches. Here's the info I received on adjusting the clutch:

    The clutch has a series of exposed springs around the outside, to adjust the torque setting of the clutch, you need to turn each bolt on the springs the same number of rotations to keep an even pressure all the way around the clutch. Turning the bolts to compress the spring will increase the torque setting, and turning to expand the springs will decrease the torque setting. The clutch is shipped from us preset at 8,000 in-lbs setting. If you turn the springs down to the point they are fully compressed, then the clutch will not slip giving you no protection.

    Looks like your slip clutch is a little tight. I'd check the spring compression closely and then consult the manufacturer about adjusting it, assuming the instructions that came with the tiller are not adequate. CCM probably is the place to start.

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