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  1. #1
    Silver Member
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    May 2006
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    236
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    Purcellville, Va
    Tractor
    B7200D, B8200D

    Default Nanco tires any good?

    I recently bought a well used B8200 with mismatched, 2-ply front tires. I ordered a set of 4 ply tires from gempler's, and received a set of namcos. both say 4PR (ply rating) but one is two ply, one is three ply? It doesn't annoy me enough to send them back, but before I mounted them up I figured I'd ask for opinions. FWIW they're 6-12 lug tires, tubeless, with 600lb ratings. I also found that namco makes a heavy duty version of the tire that holds 750lbs. I do have a loader, is it worth the hassle of sending these back and getting the heavier tires for the extra load capacity?
    whodat

  2. #2
    Elite Member
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    Jul 2003
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    3,373
    Location
    Goffs Corner, KY
    Tractor
    IH 2444

    Default Re: Nanco tires any good?

    If using a loader I would get heavy duty tires.

  3. #3
    Elite Member AlanB's Avatar
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    Jan 2004
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    2,532
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    Clarksville, TN, USA
    Tractor
    NH 1925

    Default Re: Nanco tires any good?

    Too me (and there are plenty that will disagree) Yes, I would send them back and get the heavier one's that I would want.

    I went with the lighter tires on our's becuase they were in stock and the CEO was in the middle of a job and the co-op was right up the street from the job. She was back on the job in one hour.....

    But every time I look at them, I wish I had the heavier ones, particularly with a large load in the bucket.

  4. #4
    Veteran Member tractorErnie's Avatar
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    Mar 2002
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    in the palm trees
    Tractor
    Yanmars = Fx235- F255- FX33 - hinomoto JF1 New Holland 7610 Branson 3510 tlb

    Default Re: Nanco tires any good?

    Nancos are made in china, so you get what you pay for.
    If it were me I would buy heavy duty ones like slowrev suggested, and you will be safer when you have a full load in the bucket

  5. #5
    Platinum Member roxynoodle's Avatar
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    May 2006
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    989
    Location
    NW Ohio
    Tractor
    Yanmar 1510d, 1950 Farmall H

    Default Re: Nanco tires any good?

    I would buy the heavy duty ones because I have to replace my front tires, which have become total garbage compared to my back ones. I also have a loader.

  6. #6
    Gold Member
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    Mar 2006
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    260
    Location
    Central IL
    Tractor
    Kubota BX2230, JD 400, AC 190XT

    Default Re: Nanco tires any good?

    I sell Nancos. They are not an especially good tire but there is a market for junk just as there is a market for quality.

    Instead of the amount of plies in a tire, what you want to pay attention to is the load range. For example, if they are both load range C. An 11R245 14 ply Goodyear actually has just a 1 ply sidewall. It would be a load range G. Talking about plies is actually a bit antiquated.

  7. #7
    Elite Member woodlandfarms's Avatar
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    Jul 2006
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    4,887
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    Los Angeles / SW Washington
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    PowerTrac 1850

    Default Re: Nanco tires any good?

    Quote Originally Posted by Billy_S
    I sell Nancos. They are not an especially good tire but there is a market for junk just as there is a market for quality.

    Instead of the amount of plies in a tire, what you want to pay attention to is the load range. For example, if they are both load range C. An 11R245 14 ply Goodyear actually has just a 1 ply sidewall. It would be a load range G. Talking about plies is actually a bit antiquated.
    Can you provide a list of loads and how the symbols correspond?

  8. #8
    Silver Member
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    May 2006
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    236
    Location
    Purcellville, Va
    Tractor
    B7200D, B8200D

    Default Re: Nanco tires any good?

    Well, quality or not I put them on. Breaking ground on my new garage next week and needed to have the tractor usable asap. FWIW they were under $100 for the pair, so if they last 6 months I got my money's worth and can look for higher quality tires then. The fun I found when putting the tires on, though... Spooned one off, the replacement on, no problem. A bit of rust on the rim, a bit of roughness on the bead seat, no problem. Both cleaned up with a wire wheel in the drill, installed the tire, 40psi to seat the beads and all is good. Other than the fact that 4 of the studs pulled out of the wheel flange, three of the nuts on were the wrong size and all of the studs that pulled out did so because they were installed backwards. That was a whole other issue. Fixed that, installed the studs with locktite, moved on. Pulled the other wheel off, started to spoon the tire off. This was the one that really got me thinking it needed replacement, no tread plus lots of sidewall canyons (can't really call them cracks at this point) Come to find out that this was a known problem, inasmuch as this tire had a tube. It had a tube because there were so many holes, gouges, cracks, etc. in the tire that it could not possibly hold air on it's own. The problem is that they didn't do anything to prepare the rim for having a tube. This left a roughly 3/8" valve stem sticking through a 3/4" hole. All the metal around the valve stem hole for ~3" on either side was totally rusted. For the sake of expediency I wired through the rust, painted it with POR (paint over rust) rustoleum, and then covered that with ducting tape (metal foil tape, not cloth duct tape) and cut through it for the valve stem to stick through. This should hold it till this winter when I can pull the tire off again and weld the hole closed, repair the rust, and drill a new hole. Did I mention that I had one bead back on the rim and the tube in before I realized I put the tire on backwards? Yay for me! I honestly believe that if you have sinned grievously and need to atone, swapping tubeless tires on the floor with homemade tire irons is the way to do it.
    Oh well, they're on and holding air, they meet specs for the tractor, and surprisingly enough they made steering much easier. I'll give updates as I get more time on them.
    Assuming that these are junk tires and only last a couple months, what are the recommended brands for a 6-12 4 ply lug tire?
    whodat

  9. #9
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Location
    Purcellville, Va
    Tractor
    B7200D, B8200D

    Default Re: Nanco tires any good?

    Quote Originally Posted by woodlandfarms
    Can you provide a list of loads and how the symbols correspond?
    some web site
    TM 9-2610-200-14 1-24 SECTION II. EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTION AND DATA (Con't) 1-9. TIRE MARKINGS AND CODES (Con't). d. PLY RATING AND LOAD RANGE. Methods of indicating ply rating, or the strength of a tire are either with a ply rating or load range imprinted on the tire sidewall. The ply rating number and/or load range character are designations of the tire strength and do not necessarily indicate the actual number of cord plies. A tire with an 12 ply rating or F load range may actually have less than 12 cord plies but would be of equal strength to a tire with 12 cord plies. In the example, 12 ply or F load range indicates a ply rating of 12. The load range letters A through N represent the ply rating in even numbers 2 through 24 respectively.


    some other web site
    Ply Rating/Load Range
    While there is no industry-wide definition of ply rating, truck tires are frequently marked with ply rating and equivalent Load Range. These markings are used to identify the load and inflation limits of that particular tire, when used in a specific type of service. The table shows the conversion of tire markings.

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