Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 54
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    3,371
    Location
    California - S.F. East Bay & Sierra foothills
    Tractor
    Kubota L2500DT Standard Transmission

    Default Re: Bulldozing With A Box Blade

    <font color=blue>I find it very effective and especially with the swing back type boxblades</font color=blue>

    Now that's an interesting point, J. As you may recall from an earlier thread, I find that flappy rear blade a bit of a frustration. It never occurred to me to try using it backwards. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/clever.gif[/img]

    Now I'm anxious to try this out. Unfortunately I'll have little to boxblade but sticky mud for a while, so I may not get to it until things dry out a bit. My conclusion from this thread so far is that I will be taking minimal risk if I stick to areas with reasonaly good soil conditions and approach it "gingerly" (is that an okay term to use for tractorin'?).

  2. #12
    Super Member ronjhall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    7,437
    Location
    SE Michigan, TX when its cold in MI.
    Tractor
    Kubota 2910 HST

    Default Re: Bulldozing With A Box Blade

    Harv
    A few months ago I posted a thread on <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.tractorbynet.com/cgi-bin/compact/showthreaded.pl?Cat=&amp;Board=owning&amp;Number=6 8537&amp;Search=true&amp;Forum=All_Forums&amp;Word s=27-2910%20top&amp;Match=Entire%20Phrase&amp;Searchpag e=0&amp;Limit=50&amp;Old=allposts&amp;Main=68537>2 7-2910 Top Link Bracket.</A> I don't know what type of bracket you have on your tractor but give this tread a look. The standard bracket on a B series may not be strong enough if a solid object is hit when working in reverse.

    The one on right is original.

  3. #13
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    3,239
    Location
    Eastern Virginia
    Tractor
    EarthForce EF-5 mini-TLB (2001)

    Default Re: Bulldozing With A Box Blade

    I went through about 6 of the threaded rods that screw into the turnbuckles that control the amount of side-to-side play the implement has when I had the L3710GST. I determined that the damage was coming about equally from hitting a root or rock with the corner of the 8' heavy duty blade and "bulldozing" backwards with the box scraper.

    When I got the L4310HST with the square tube-in-a-tube adjusters, I never had any more problems, despite the fact that I used the same implements with even more power and traction than I had before.

    I never had any problems with anything else on the three point hitch on either machine.

  4. #14
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    323
    Location
    Northern Kentucky
    Tractor
    l245dt

    Default Re: Bulldozing With A Box Blade

    well in my opion the 3 pt is made for pulling not pushing.all though i have pushed a few times i have bent the lift arm on the one side but i wasnt pushing evenly on the box scraper. took it the the local fab shop and the bent it back stright at noo cost.

  5. #15
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    5,666
    Location
    Cedartown, Ga and N. Ga mountains
    Tractor
    1998 Kubota B21, 2005 Kubota L39

    Default Re: Bulldozing With A Box Blade

    Mark,

    That turnbuckle is the weak link on my B21 also. On mine the end of the turnbuckle as U shaped bracket with eyes on the end for a pin. Those darn eyes are elongated to where it takes a hammer and punch to remove the pin.[img]/w3tcompact/icons/frown.gif[/img] I believe that my rear blade is the biggest problem. If you take and catch a rock on the end of the blade it puts a lot of stress on that turnbuckle.

    MarkV

  6. #16
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    3,239
    Location
    Eastern Virginia
    Tractor
    EarthForce EF-5 mini-TLB (2001)

    Default Re: Bulldozing With A Box Blade

    MarkV - You might check the new L-series style adjusters at your kubota dealer. They just might fit and they're a whole lot more robust than the turnbuckle type. I hated those things. And the drop-a-pin-in-a-hole adjustment approach is so much easier, too.

  7. #17
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    1,659
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area California (CA)
    Tractor
    Kubota B7500

    Default Re: Bulldozing With A Box Blade

    Funny you should mention that. I just did something like this last Sunday.

    The next door neighbor is putting in a new fence, and wanted the area along the fence line to be more level than what it was (undulations). It was also sloped pretty close to the maximum that I'm comfortable with (13 degrees on my tilt meter [img]/w3tcompact/icons/shocked.gif[/img]).

    So I angled the boxblade to cut into the slope, and bulldozed backward to push out the fence line. This made me more comfortable (Me and Lucy are on the "less sloping part that's just been leveled), and seemed to work OK, except when I hit the occasional rock. With Lucy, I run out of traction before I run out of power. So in those situations, I just raised the blade a notch or two, and tried again.

  8. #18
    Super Member
    Rest in Peace
    frank_f15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    6,033
    Location
    BUFFALO ,NEW YORK AREA
    Tractor
    kubota b2400- R4 tires

    Default Re: Bulldozing With A Box Blade

    as long a s u ain't doing 50 mph, i don't see where it would be a problem. as i always say SLOW AND EASY.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    3,371
    Location
    California - S.F. East Bay & Sierra foothills
    Tractor
    Kubota L2500DT Standard Transmission

    Default Re: Bulldozing With A Box Blade

    Ron -

    The top link bracket on my li'l L may be a bit heftier (see attached), but the tractor itself is also heavier, so there's that much more weight to slam into the immovable object.

    GlueGuy just confirmed that it can be done, but I think Frank has probably hit on the key -- go slow. Whenever I'm engaging dirt I'm generally at the low end of low range anyway, so that part should seem natural enough.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #20
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    1,591
    Location
    Western Connecticut
    Tractor
    2003 Kubota L3430

    Default Re: Bulldozing With A Box Blade

    I've "bulldozed" by driving backward with my backblade facing backward. That's how I plow snow. I've had some hard bangs into protruding rocks with no damage.

    I think you are all missing the subtle physics here. If you are driving forward and you hit something with the bottom edge of a blade on your 3ph, your lower two arms are being stretched but your top link is compressed. If you are pushing backward (bulldozing) and the bottom edge of your blade hits something, your two bottom arms are being compressed but your top link is being stretched. So the only difference that forward or backward collisions makes is which arms get stretched and which get compressed. I don't know enough about the construction of the three arms to say that one pattern of compression/stretching is worse on the whole than the other.

    Right?! We need Patrickq to explain this.

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2014 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.