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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Aug 2000
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    3,371
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    California - S.F. East Bay & Sierra foothills
    Tractor
    Kubota L2500DT Standard Transmission

    Default Bulldozing With A Box Blade

    On another thread, Greg H. explained how he uses his box blade in reverse to achieve some high quality grading effects.

    I have used my own box blade this way only a few times, usually just to push a small pile of spoils out of the way or something. Greg's point about going backwards is that this keeps the tractor itself on the already graded part, thus producing a flatter, smoother result. Makes sense to me. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/clever.gif[/img]

    My concern, however, is the strain this puts on the 3-pt, especially when you run into the inevitable immovable rock or hidden stump. Those linkages are clearly made for some robust lifting, but when it comes to head-on (tail-on?) collisions, they don't strike me as being up to the challenge.

    Any thoughts/experiences?

  2. #2
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Mar 2000
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    37,535
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    Texas

    Default Re: Bulldozing With A Box Blade

    Harv, I've got a lousy memory for finding some of the old threads, or remembering who posted them, but didn't someone recently post a message and pictures of a bent lower link from pushing against something with one end of his box blade? I'd be a little cautious about putting all the pressure on one end of the blade, and of course, I wouldn't want to get a run at something and slam into it, but I've never worried about pushing as hard as the tractor could with the load reasonably centered. And so far, I've never damaged anything, but maybe I've just been lucky.[img]/w3tcompact/icons/blush.gif[/img] There's no doubt that those lower links can stand more pressure pulling than they can pushing.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Oct 2000
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    199
    Location
    Kalispell, Montana
    Tractor
    Kubota 2910

    Default Re: Bulldozing With A Box Blade

    Harv

    Awhile back, I was filling in and leveling an area on my property. The project called for alot of dirt to be moved and filled in on the down-slope side of the project.

    Pushing the uncompacted dirt with the box blade worked very well to enlarge the level area. The rear tires were able to reach the edge of the fill, compacting the dirt.

    Like you, I have pushed dirt backwards to fill small spots but I do not find that backwards bulldozing works very well for larger areas and general leveling. Seems the blade, sooner or later, will either dig down and the wheels begin to spin ruining what you have already done or the blade bucks up over a rock or other obstruction. Just don't think you have the control you need.

    I second your concerns about the strength of the three-point. It does not appear to be designed to take such forces.


    Rick

  4. #4
    Veteran Member gerard's Avatar
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    Apr 2000
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    1,681
    Location
    Syracuse NY
    Tractor
    Kubota L2500DT w/FEL

    Default Re: Bulldozing With A Box Blade

    Some may disagree but I think this is one reason for NOT having too much traction ie loading your tires etc. The way I look at it is I'll lose traction and spin the tires before I break/bend something - kind of like a shear bolt! Besides, when doing what he described you're going pretty slow. I've done what he described and hit rocks. I'll just lose traction - haven't bent any arms yet and if I bend a top link that's only $20. Even dozer operate that way - if they hit an imovable object they just spin the treads!

  5. #5
    Veteran Member
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    Jan 2001
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    1,314
    Location
    Alberta
    Tractor
    Kubota B2410 with turfs

    Default Re: Bulldozing With A Box Blade

    Harv,

    Not sure that I see a difference between running a boxblade backwords as a bulldozer or running a blade backwards as a bulldozer....and aren't blades designed to do this (ie swing 360 degrees to allow you to push backwards). A good solid blade will transfer the "hit" to the 3ph as much as a box blade I would think. Aren't "blades" in general and 3ph's designed to handle this??

    I certainly agree with the other opinions that my B2410 would stop and spin long before I would expect any cracking or damage to the link arms.

    Just my $0.02.

    Kevin

  6. #6
    Veteran Member mikim's Avatar
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    Feb 2001
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    2,323
    Location
    Paige Texas
    Tractor
    NH TC45

    Default Re: Bulldozing With A Box Blade

    I've hit a lot of stumps and trees with mine - hard enough to shake my teeth and done no damage to the tractor - I don't think we need to worry too much about the occasional "oops what was that hit!" When backing up we ain't going that fast anyway - at least I'm not.
    mike

  7. #7
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
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    2,630
    Location
    Kansas
    Tractor
    Kubota BX2200, Kubota B2410

    Default Re: Bulldozing With A Box Blade

    I bulldoze backwards with both of mine a lot. I find it very effective and especially with the swing back type boxblades it really is the only way to do leveling work also. For bulldozing I use the box approximately flat or angled down to the rear slightly and for leveling and smoothing I I tilt the aft end of the box upwards so that it rides on the inner blade. Swing back type do not work well in forward motion for this use since the rear blade just swings out of the way.
    I would really think the tractors are made for working in both directions and if they were so flimsy and weak I would be dissappointed and think broken 3-points would be common. It's a tractor, it is meant to be worked, that is it's only purpose.
    J

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
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    566
    Location
    Williamson, NY (near Rochester)
    Tractor
    JD 4300 MFWD

    Default Re: Bulldozing With A Box Blade

    Harv,

    I suppose the same question would apply to using a dirt scoop.. you back into the pile, raise, and drive away. The backing in part might be risky, eh?

    Bob

  9. #9
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
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    6,737
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    JD 8320 MFWD, JD 6415 MFWD, FEL, and cab, John Deere MFWD 4600, John Deere 4020, John Deere 4430, John Deere 455 mower, Deutz, and Gehl 4610 perkins skidsteer

    Default Re: Bulldozing With A Box Blade

    Harv,
    Your concerns are warranted. I've even bent the three point arms on big tractors from doing the very same thing you are talking about. Yes the three point arms are very strong but were made lifting and not for bulldozing. They may hold up to it for awhile but eventually and with use they will give. Just take a look at the arms on a loader or a bulldozer blade for that matter and then take a look at your three point arms and make your own analysis of whether or not the three point arms were made for bulldozing type work.

  10. #10
    Silver Member cedarranch's Avatar
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    Oct 2001
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    217
    Location
    Bremen, Alabama
    Tractor
    Ford 3430 and Zetor Zebra 2520

    Default Re: Bulldozing With A Box Blade

    Harv, I have never used a compact tractor but over the years I have used ag tractors like ford 3000, 3600, 4000, etc. to do this very thing. I have RAMMED 5' and 6' box blades into stumps, pipes, poles, and rocks. The only thing to fail was a broken lower link pin and a slightly bent but usable CAT 2 top link. I am not saying this is good practice [img]/w3tcompact/icons/wink.gif[/img] and i am not sure how sturdy the 3pt is on compacts, but I will continue to 'bulldoze'. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/grin.gif[/img]

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