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  1. #21
    Epic Contributor MossRoad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    24,063
    Location
    South Bend, Indiana (near)
    Tractor
    Power Trac PT425 2001 Model Year

    Default Re: How Accidents Happen

    I don't even have a neutral. There is no choice. It is always in gear. I find that to be a safety hazard, so I always turn it off and set the brake(which is a pin in slot type), as recommended in the Power Trac manual. EXCEPT, that I have to start it up and let it run for about 5-10 minutes in extremely cold weather. So I throw open the garage doors, sit on it, make sure that the brake is set, start it and then OH SO CAREFULLY, get off. There is just no way around it. I can't sit on it for 10 minutes idling in a garage or I would choke to death, even with good ventilation. I just take it as part of the hazards of operating a machine. You always have to keep your wits about you and move slowly and purposely or you will get hurt. That goes for any machine, power tool, even a hammer. Use it wrong and you get hurt.

  2. #22
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    3,239
    Location
    Eastern Virginia
    Tractor
    EarthForce EF-5 mini-TLB (2001)

    Default Re: How Accidents Happen

    MossRoad - Does your PT have the same right foot forward/left foot reverse treadle that the 24xx machines have? If so, you could very easily install a solenoid that was manually switched, or perhaps seat pressure switched, that would lock it in the center position. That might make you feel a little better about it - and make it safer to get on or off, as well.

  3. #23
    Epic Contributor MossRoad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    24,063
    Location
    South Bend, Indiana (near)
    Tractor
    Power Trac PT425 2001 Model Year

    Default Re: How Accidents Happen

    Yup. If you get off on either side, you stand a good chance of either stepping on or hooking your foot under one of the pedals. So where would you put the solenoid? Which side? Neither? Maybe a slot and pin similar to the brake?

    There are times(like the warmup mentioned before) that I would like to get off of the unit while it is running. One project that comes to mind is a log splitter.

    And one other safety note on an articulated tractor. If it is running, and you try to get off of it, where do you step and what do you hang on to? You step down right next to the unit and grab the steering wheel for balance. Then you end up pulling the steering wheel and the unit articulates right around your leg![img]/w3tcompact/icons/shocked.gif[/img] This was mentioned prominently in the manual as a pinch point. All in all, I think they could make the unit safer at the factory by installing direction and steering locks hooked to a seat pressure switch. And if one of the safety devices malfunctions, that is almost worse, because people depend on them. Where do you draw the line when manufacturing a product? You can't make a product fool proof, just fool resistant[img]/w3tcompact/icons/tongue.gif[/img].

  4. #24
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    3,676
    Location
    Grayson County, TX
    Tractor
    Kubota B2710

    Default Re: How Accidents Happen

    I've had a couple of close calls on my 2710. I have accidentally hit the pedal on the way off, causing the tractor to lurch forward or backward. Its dangerous, especially if someone else was nearby to get hit or run over.

  5. #25
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    3,239
    Location
    Eastern Virginia
    Tractor
    EarthForce EF-5 mini-TLB (2001)

    Default Re: How Accidents Happen

    MossRoad - My thought was to put the solenoid in the center, as far from the pivot point as possible.

    I don't remember the exact sizing of the pinch point where the smaller PT's articulate, but you'd have to be in a really specific spot and move the wheel quite a bit to get pinched with the bigger ones. Maybe you could install a grab handle, so you don't need the steering wheel for support. I don't think I'd want to install a locking device on the steering wheel, though you could perhaps use one that retracts by means of an internal spring when it's not powered.

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    311
    Location
    Vermilion County, IL
    Tractor
    2000 B7500HSD Kubota, 2 Case ingersol 448 tractors

    Default Re: How Accidents Happen

    I have a b7500 hst. I have always on my b7200 droped the fel to the ground as a brake. JIM

  7. #27
    Epic Contributor MossRoad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    24,063
    Location
    South Bend, Indiana (near)
    Tractor
    Power Trac PT425 2001 Model Year

    Default Re: How Accidents Happen

    I was thinking of a way of locking the steering hydraulics, not the wheel itself. Some sort of electric soleniod in the hydraulic line. It wouldn't be too hard either. I dont know if the same could be done for the directional hydraulics or not.

    As far as a grab handle, there is a much more logical one... the ROPS is right there in front on both sides. People just tend to grab the wheel because it is familiar from their car driving experience.

  8. #28
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    3,239
    Location
    Eastern Virginia
    Tractor
    EarthForce EF-5 mini-TLB (2001)

    Default Re: How Accidents Happen

    MossRoad - Yeah, you could put the lockout on the hydraulic line, but you'd be actuating the relief valve every time you touched the wheel. Either way, you'd want to make sure the "default" position of the solenoid was "unlocked". Another possibility, depending on the steering wheel configuration, would be to use a solenoid to provide a friction brake function for the wheel, that way, you could still turn the wheel by overcoming the braking resistance, in case of a malfunction.

  9. #29
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    670
    Location
    Ontario, NY
    Tractor
    JD 790 (2001)

    Default Re: How Accidents Happen

    Jinman.

    <font color=blue>"I grew up standing up on a tractor when needed and I still do."</font color=blue>

    Those guys over there in the Seat Belt thread would love to hear from you!

    Best of luck,

    Buck

  10. #30
    Veteran Member Charlie_Iliff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    1,896
    Location
    Arnold, MD
    Tractor
    Power Trac PT1845, John Deere 2240, John Deere 950, John Deere 755, Jacobsen Turf Cat II

    Default Re: How Accidents Happen

    MossRoad &amp; MChalkley:
    I'm a bit late into this thread. My PT 1845 has an engine kill seat switch. When you get off, it kills the engine and sets the brakes. Due to impatience, therefore, I don't warm it as thoroughly as can be done with the 425. (I haven't tried a cinder block on the seat) I just move slowly until the temp gauge comes up.
    Someday I may get a post driver. Either it will require two people, or I'll have to inactivate the seat switch.
    For now, I'll get used to it, although starting and stopping the engine can't be as good for it as letting it idle.

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