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  1. #1
    Elite Member rockyridgefarm's Avatar
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    Deere 4310 HST MFWD

    Default DIY Tire Ballast?

    I am going to try pumping in my own tire ballast. I have access to lots of nontoxic antifreeze. My tires are the tube type. I think I can set up a pump that will hook up, by connecting a tire inflator hose to a pond pump or windshield washer pump. I know brine is heavier, but this will be good enough for me....

    Any Suggestions?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
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    182
    Location
    Fergus, Ontario,Canada
    Tractor
    Cub Cadets 104,129,149, Jinma 284

    Default Re: DIY Tire Ballast?

    Just remember to let the air out of the tire as you are filling it with fluid(you can buy a do hickey that lets the air out when filling)have fun[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

  3. #3
    Super Star Member RoyJackson's Avatar
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    Nov 2001
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    Bethel, Vermont
    Tractor
    John Deere 4400 MFWD, Deere 855D UTV and assorted implements

    Default Re: DIY Tire Ballast?

    I just ordered an Air/Liquid Valve for Ballast from NAPA.
    Won't see it for a week or so, but the price was <font color=red>$18 plus tax</font color=red>. The Drill Motor powered pump was <font color=red>$7.00</font color=red> from ACE Hardware.

    There was a thread on TBN recently dicussing this very issue. The pertinent text of two (2) posts is below. The Posters were Bird and MarkV, I believe. If I got that wrong, please accept my apologies, guys...

    <font color=blue>I filled the rear tires of my tractor with the environmentally safe anti freeze (I think the brand was Sierra) and here is how I did it. First you need a special valve that screws into the valve stem. I got one from a tractor dealer for $7 and I have heard that Napa has or can get them. The valve allows you to hook up a garden hose to it for the water and has a little release button to let out air. You let most of the air out of the tire, start putting water in, as the air pressure builds you turn off the water and bleed off air with the release button. I wanted about 75% full so I had the valve stem at the 2 o’clock position and when water rather than air came out of the release valve it was full. Of course the above only puts the water in. For the anti-freeze I used one of the drill operated pumps that has hose fittings on both ends and cost about $10. I put the anti-freeze in a bucket and pumped it into the tire the same way as the water. I did put the anti-freeze in first. With both liquids in I positioned the valve stem at 12 o’clock and added the normal amount of air pressure. You do need to make sure you have the valve stem on top when checking pressure or the liquid will do bad things to your pressure gauge.

    As far as removing the existing fill, it will drain out of the valve stem. I think the problem will be containing it.

    MarkV



    liquid will do bad things to your pressure gauge

    Mark, you can also buy air/liquid tire gauges, which is what I used, although I still only checked tire pressure with the valve stem at the 12 o'clock position, and always gave it just a short burst of air first to clear the valve.


    dwb,
    I loaded my tires with Windshield Washer Fluid. !0 gallons in each tire, That adds about 180-200 lbs to the rear and makes a huge difference when using the FEL, both for balance and traction. You can buy a special valve at any NAPA auto store for around $6.00 and if you have one of those little transfer pumps that hooks to an electric drill you can do it yourself in no time. I used a 5 gallon pail, filled it with the fluid, then transferred it right into the wheel. A word of caution though. When you jack up the rear of the tractor, make sure the jack heavily favors the side of the tractor that has the tire your filling. I ballanced mine right in the center the first time and about half way thru the filling the whole tractor suddenly listed in my direction due to the added weight I was putting in the tire! DUH!
    Greg, I filled the rear tires of my tractor with the environmentally safe anti freeze (I think the brand was Sierra) and here is how I did it. First you need a special valve that screws into the valve stem. I got one from a tractor dealer for $7 and I have heard that Napa has or can get them. The valve allows you to hook up a garden hose to it for the water and has a little release button to let out air. You let most of the air out of the tire, start putting water in, as the air pressure builds you turn off the water and bleed off air with the release button. I wanted about 75% full so I had the valve stem at the 2 o’clock position and when water rather than air came out of the release valve it was full. Of course the above only puts the water in. For the anti-freeze I used one of the drill operated pumps that has hose fittings on both ends and cost about $10. I put the anti-freeze in a bucket and pumped it into the tire the same way as the water. I did put the anti-freeze in first. With both liquids in I positioned the valve stem at 12 o’clock and added the normal amount of air pressure. You do need to make sure you have the valve stem on top when checking pressure or the liquid will do bad things to your pressure gauge.

    As far as removing the existing fill, it will drain out of the valve stem. I think the problem will be containing it.

    MarkV



    liquid will do bad things to your pressure gauge

    Mark, you can also buy air/liquid tire gauges, which is what I used, although I still only checked tire pressure with the valve stem at the 12 o'clock position, and always gave it just a short burst of air first to clear the valve.


    dwb,
    I loaded my tires with Windshield Washer Fluid. !0 gallons in each tire, That adds about 180-200 lbs to the rear and makes a huge difference when using the FEL, both for balance and traction. You can buy a special valve at any NAPA auto store for around $6.00 and if you have one of those little transfer pumps that hooks to an electric drill you can do it yourself in no time. I used a 5 gallon pail, filled it with the fluid, then transferred it right into the wheel. A word of caution though. When you jack up the rear of the tractor, make sure the jack heavily favors the side of the tractor that has the tire your filling. I ballanced mine right in the center the first time and about half way thru the filling the whole tractor suddenly listed in my direction due to the added weight I was putting in the tire! DUH! </font color=blue>

  4. #4
    Elite Member rockyridgefarm's Avatar
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    Deere 4310 HST MFWD

    Default Re: DIY Tire Ballast?

    thanks I will go at it this weekend I am going to try a setup I made for my Jeeps windshield washer pump, unless I find the fill adapter.

  5. #5
    Elite Member rockyridgefarm's Avatar
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    Deere 4310 HST MFWD

    Default Re: DIY Tire Ballast?

    I found the fill adapter at an ag center for $7. I have a sump pump to tranfer the antifreeze and i'll bet it will go swell

    Now maybe those front tires will stay on the ground where they belong

    Thanks again[img]/w3tcompact/icons/grin.gif[/img]

  6. #6
    Elite Member rockyridgefarm's Avatar
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    Deere 4310 HST MFWD

    Default Re: DIY Tire Ballast?

    Following all this great input, I did it today without any hitches. My pond scoop handled 100% better

    I used a sump pump attached to the adapter I bought, and it worked perfectly. I got 3 gallons of washer fluid into each of my front tires. I saw that the rear are tubeless, do I am going to use nontoxic antifreeze, there. I can get that at a clients for free, so it should be fine.

  7. #7
    Veteran Member Rowski's Avatar
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    May 2000
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    North Central Vermont, Jay Peak Area
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    2004 New Holland TN70DA with 32LC loader, 2000 New Holland 2120 with Curtis cab, 7309 loader

    Default Re: DIY Tire Ballast?

    <font color=blue>My pond scoop handled 100% better</font color=blue>

    What's the "scoop" with the pond scoop? Any pictures?

  8. #8
    Elite Member rockyridgefarm's Avatar
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    Deere 4310 HST MFWD

    Default Re: DIY Tire Ballast?

    Actually, I have another thread under Yanmar. I managed to break my transmission housing, but that had nothing much to do with this, except that I did it with my pond scoop. Probably keeping my front end down made me able to move around more efficiently and helped my do the damage. After it is repaired, everything should be better than new. The pond scoop is really nice, but no FEL.

  9. #9
    Platinum Member
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    Mar 2002
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    Jackson County, Michigan
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    Bolens HT-20

    Default Re: DIY Tire Ballast?

    Thanks for the info on NAPA. I just picked up the filler unit today. Plan on doing the fill in all four tires next week. It did run about twenty bucks after taxes. Neat little tool.

  10. #10
    Silver Member
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    Pine Bush NY
    Tractor
    Yanmar 1401

    Default Re: DIY Tire Ballast?

    Does anyone know the NAPA part number for the tire filling valve. I tried to locate it on their website but I couldn't find it. I also went to the Napa store and didn't have much luck. The guy found something but said it was 165$. I don't think it was the part I was looking for.. Also maybe someone has a picture possibly so I could know what I'm looking for.
    Thanks

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