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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
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    Williamson, NY (near Rochester)
    Tractor
    JD 4300 MFWD

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    <font color=blue>...Did the compressor come with a quick disconnect already attached? If not, one goes on the hose, for connecting the tool, and the other goes on the compressor, so you can easily disconnect the hose from the compressor.</font color=blue>

    Nope. It came with nothing attached, and no attachments or hose or anything. Great idea about using the other quick connect on the compressor itself! As it is now, I have a hose that's kind of looped over the compressor and it's hard to get all the kinks out of it.

    Do most people release all pressure from their tank after every use? If the hose is not connected, does it do any harm to leave it pressured up, and just drain it every couple of weeks or so?

    Thanks for the ideas!
    Bob

  2. #12
    BTI
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    Platinum Member BTI's Avatar
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    Feb 2002
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    755
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    Nelsonville, Ohio
    Tractor
    Haven't decided yet......It'll be a Kioti None the less

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    <font color=blue>When I finish doodling in the garage, I simply go to the compressor, and press the blower trigger with my toe; it protrudes from under the compressor just enough so my big big toe can get at it.</font color=blue> Does this mean you work in barefeet???!!!!![img]/w3tcompact/icons/laugh.gif[/img]
    BTI

  3. #13
    Super Member RobS's Avatar
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    Jun 2000
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    6,233
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Tractor
    John Deere 790

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    <font color=blue>Do most people release all pressure from their tank after every use? </font color=blue>

    I'll probably take a lot of flak for this Bob, but I NEVER release the pressure in my tank. Once in a blue moon if I think about it I'll open the drain valve and let some accumulated water spit out.

    My compressor is a cheapie Craftsman nearly 20 years old. Still does everything I ask of it and if the tank does rot out I'll get another one. I don't expect a catastophic failure as it will probably begin leaking slowly.

    On the other hand, we just put in a rotary screw compressor at work (big $). It provides air to a machine shop. That system is equipped with filters, auto drain valves, seperators and a number of other fancy gizmos. Waay overkill for my needs at home [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

  4. #14
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    I never drain the air out of my compressor, but I do regularly open the drain valve to let out the water in the bottom. Now-a-days a new compressor probably came with a pressure regulator so you can turn down the pressure for things such as paint spray guns. If it didn't have one, I'd add one. And I don't think hardly any of them come with a filter, so I always add that to the compressor and then the quick coupler for the hose(s).

    And above all, remember to keep your air tools lubricated; a shot of air tool oil in the air intake regularly (you can't hurt anything by using too much; the excess will just blow out the exhaust), and then some of them have a grease fitting that will need periodic greasing with a needle nosed grease gun (you can recognize this by a flat or dimpled circle with a tiny ball bearing in the center), while others have 20W or 30W non-detergent motor oil in the front end (you'll recognize that by a plug - removed with either a screwdriver or an allen wrench - labelled "oil"). Air tool oil every time you use the tool; grease or motor oil monthly with daily use; a couple of times a year for most other folks, and too much motor oil or grease will reduce the power until the excess works it way out, but will not damage the tool.

  5. #15
    Veteran Member
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    Oct 2001
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    1,134
    Location
    South Carolina
    Tractor
    Kubota B7500

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    Draining and separating water is not so important if using air tools or a sandblaster but can be critical if doing any kind of painting. I also like to keep the water put into my car tires to a minimum as that's one of the causes of a tires air pressure climbing when warm.

    Jeff

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
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    566
    Location
    Williamson, NY (near Rochester)
    Tractor
    JD 4300 MFWD

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    <font color=blue>...And I don't think hardly any of them come with a filter, so I always add that to the compressor and then the quick coupler for the hose(s). </font color=blue>

    A filter, eh? Is this something a normal hardware store, or a Chase-Pitkin kind of place would have? Just a screw in thingy with a replaceable element? Keeps the moisture out of the tools?

    Thanks, Bird. Sounds like I have a bit more work to do before everything is ready to use.

  7. #17
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    Bob, any place that sells compressors will surely have filters also, and the prices vary tremendously. They are filter/water separators and for most purposes the cheaper ones (under $25) serve well, but you may still get some moisture through them, especially if you use the air for extended periods of time during times of high humidity. If you want one that automatically adds oil so you don't have to put it in the air intake of your tools, expect to pay $100 or more (I don't recommend those to anyone except professionals who are using their air tools all day every day). If you're using a paint gun, you don't want the automatic oiler. And if you're painting with oil based paints (or even a lot with latex), you need a filter/dryer that will certainly run over $100. Personally, I use one of the cheaper filter/water separators for home use. And I've always had to buy a short piece of threaded pipe at the hardware store to hook the filter to the compressor.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
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    Location
    Williamson, NY (near Rochester)
    Tractor
    JD 4300 MFWD

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    Hi Bird,

    If I understand you correctly, the filter you are recommending for home use would really only help me in that it would prevent me from having to put some oil in the tools air intake? At the moment, the only tool I have, other than the pressure air blaster thingy and a tire inflator, is a Coleman impact wrench, and I don't mind doing a bit of oiling of it after each use because I expect to use it infrequently. Probably just to change lawn mower blades and perhaps to loosen lug nuts when doing tire/wheel changes on the cars. I should probably oil it that often anyway, no?

    If I were doing lots of work with this thing, I would think the filter would be great.. but given the above do you see any need for one?

    Appreciate your advise!!

    Bob

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
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    566
    Location
    Williamson, NY (near Rochester)
    Tractor
    JD 4300 MFWD

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    Hi Bird,

    If I understand you correctly, the filter you are recommending for home use would really only help me in that it would prevent me from having to put some oil in the tools air intake? At the moment, the only tool I have, other than the pressure air blaster thingy and a tire inflator, is a Coleman impact wrench, and I don't mind doing a bit of oiling of it after each use because I expect to use it infrequently. Probably just to change lawn mower blades and perhaps to loosen lug nuts when doing tire/wheel changes on the cars. I should probably oil it that often anyway, no?

    If I were doing lots of work with this thing, I would think the filter would be great.. but given the above do you see any need for one?

    Appreciate your advice!!

    Bob

  10. #20
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    Bob, I don't recommend the one that adds oil, but I do recommend the cheap filter/water separator - not absolutely necessary, and you may not want to do it, but even if you regularly drain the water out of the tank, you'll still get a little bit through the air hose and I don't like that in my air tool. Of course one trick to avoiding trouble with that impact wrench is to give it a shot of air tool oil after you use it, then one brief burst on the trigger, so that you replace any moisture with oil before you put it away.

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