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  1. #21
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Mar 2000
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    38,212
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    Texas

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    By the way, Bob, be sure to read the compressor manual carefully. I'm not sure which one your got; oilless or crankcase model, but the oilless model should not be run very long at a time and even some of those with a crankcase and oil say not to run them continuously over 10 minutes. Some also have a very shallow crankcase and the oil needs to be filled right to the top of the fill hole or you can burn them up. If you read the manual though and follow it, the compressor will probably last many many years.

  2. #22
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
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    Mar 2002
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    49,213
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    Central florida
    Tractor
    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    Auto oilers and water trapping filters are fairle easy to plumb as well, and most have a water bleeder right on the filter.

    Soundguy

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    566
    Location
    Williamson, NY (near Rochester)
    Tractor
    JD 4300 MFWD

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    Bird, I got an oil-less Coleman. I'd read enough to know that it would be noisier and couldn't be run very long, but didn't think these would present a problem for me. And yes, I had read your previous post somewhere about the common mistake people make of oiling their air tools before using them and not after using them. See, many of us pick up on these little gems you toss out to us! [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    I'll add the filter.. seems silly not to.

    Thanks again for all your help!!

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    566
    Location
    Williamson, NY (near Rochester)
    Tractor
    JD 4300 MFWD

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    P.S.

    <font color=blue>...be sure to read the compressor manual carefully</font color=blue>

    I did.. it took about a minute. It's a crummy manual.. a single piece of paper, on which they have translations into about six different languages. "Push this lever to turn it on. Here are the pressure gauges. Here's the drain valve. Go with God." Okay, I exaggerate a bit, but I had hoped for more details. I love to read manuals cover to cover, but this one didn't have much of a plot. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/crazy.gif[/img] It was up to me to figure out all the rest.. with the help of you folks! [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

  5. #25
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    1,134
    Location
    South Carolina
    Tractor
    Kubota B7500

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    One of the suggestions that came with my compressor was to put a minimum of 50 feet of pipe before the water separator. This allows the water vapor to condense so the filter can catch it better. They also suggested that the piped lines should be sloped with water traps wherever the pipe goes up or comes down from above. This may be overkill for many but my eventual goal is to learn to use an airbrush in the near future.

    Jeff

  6. #26
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    296
    Location
    tulsa ok
    Tractor
    kubota l3010hst/ford 601 workhorse

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    As jeff has stated the 50' does make a difference in the amount of water that you will trap. I also use a vertical 12' drop down to the seperator and then right back up. This slows the large particles and allow the condesation to fall. I have around 600' of total piping/ hose reels attached into my system and I rarely get moisture on the working end.

    Sears does sell a good seperator for around $20

  7. #27
    Super Star Member RoyJackson's Avatar
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    Nov 2001
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    19,356
    Location
    Bethel, Vermont
    Tractor
    John Deere 4520 MFWD, Deere 855D UTV, Z920A Zero Turn Mower and assorted implements

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    I've got 3 female quick couplers plumbed in different places in the shop, three 50' air hoses, one 15' hose, and two 10' coiled hoses, and just off hand can think of at least 14 pneumatic tools I use, and of course quick couplers on everything is the only way to go

    Jeez, Bird...how big is your compressor?

  8. #28
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    856
    Location
    South West Pa/Greene county
    Tractor
    Long/Landtrac360DTC

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    <font color=blue>I'll add the filter.. seems silly not to.</font color=blue>

    Bob, I have my filter set up with a male connector on one end and a female on the other. This way I can put it as close to the tool I am using as posible. I have a 10 foot length I put between the tool and the filter, attach the filter to the end of the hose on the compressor. It is especialy important when painting, also prevents the sand from clumping when using a sand blaster. As far as oil, I just put a few drops in before and after I use my tools.

  9. #29
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Mar 2000
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    38,212
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    <font color=blue>how big</font color=blue>

    Just a 6hp, 60 gallon upright, 230 volt; not portable.[img]/w3tcompact/icons/wink.gif[/img] If I don't have enough hose to reach what I need, I just have to fill up my little 7 gallon portable tank and take it where I need it, and yes, I have quick couplers on it, too.[img]/w3tcompact/icons/laugh.gif[/img]

  10. #30

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    566
    Location
    Williamson, NY (near Rochester)
    Tractor
    JD 4300 MFWD

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    Hi Ed,

    <font color=blue>Bob, I have my filter set up with a male connector on one end and a female on the other. This way I can put it as close to the tool I am using as posible.</font color=blue>

    I looked at one hardware store last night, and they didn't have a filter. I'll keep looking. Your idea sounds good. I guess it isn't important how the filter is oriented? I had pictured something in which water settled to the bottom. Do you have to set the filter in a particular orientation before using your tools?

    Thanks,
    Bob

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