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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    566
    Location
    Williamson, NY (near Rochester)
    Tractor
    JD 4300 MFWD

    Default Use of compressed air tools

    The other day I broke down and bought myself a Coleman air compressor/tank, a 50' length of air hose, and a real cheap $34 air wrench. I figure the wrench will serve to remove lawn mower blades, and if I find I need a better one someday, I'm not out very much.

    I also got a little kit of various air tool assessories, such as a little trigger device for blow-cleaning, and misc fittings.

    Here comes the question: (finally! [img]/w3tcompact/icons/blush.gif[/img])

    This little kit contains a couple of things they call quick connects, but it isn't obvious to me how they are supposed to be used. They are similar to hydraulic quick connects.. with a part which can slide to provide the lock/unlock function. But there is no indication of how you connect these to either the air hose or the tool. As it is, I have to take a wrench and screw the air hose in to whatever tool I want to use. That must be doing it the hard way, no?

    Thanks for any hints for this rank beginner! [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    540
    Location
    Mukwonago, WI
    Tractor
    BX2200, '52 8N

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    The quick couple goes on your air hose and the male fitting screws into the tool(s). You will need to buy more male fittings so you have one for every tool. There are several different types so make sure you bring one with you to the store so you get the correct type to match your quick coupler. That's pretty much it, have fun with the new toys.

  3. #3
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Posts
    731

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    If you get the right sized quick-connect couplers and the matching male part (male-female connectors) you can have a female connector on the end of the hose and a male-connector on the end of each tool (you'll need to buy one for each tool you want to use).

    Use some white plumbing tape on the threads and just screw them on tight and leave them on. Makes changing tools a snap.

    Enjoy. I think once you get used to the compressor you'll find many uses for it...I know I did once I had it I kept finding new things to do with it. Also, the tools are relatively inexpensive compared to the electric equivalents.


  4. #4
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    4,383
    Location
    Janesville, Wisconsin
    Tractor
    None -yet. Until then FunBuggy (EZ-Go) will have to do!

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    I'm not sure that this is what you're talking about, but you can order and get information about air tool accessories at <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.jcwhitney.com/product.jhtml?CATID=65367&amp;BQ=jcw2>JCWhitney</A>. I've attached a picture of the quick disconnects used on air tools. The air hose should have a threaded male end on it already which you can then snap the female end onto. If the hose doesn't have this threaded connector, which it sounds like it doesn't, you would need to pick up the connector and attach it yourself. I think the easiest thing to do would be to just buy a new hose with the correct connectors already on it.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    566
    Location
    Williamson, NY (near Rochester)
    Tractor
    JD 4300 MFWD

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    Thanks Folks! That cleared it up. I think what threw me off was the fact that the little kit I bought came with two of the quick connect couplers.. so I was thinking, hmm, if the coupler part goes on the hose, then why do I need two of them? Now I understand.. I guess they just gave me two of them. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/laugh.gif[/img]

    Thanks again. This will really be handy once I get it all set up. Just for topping off tires.. let's see.. we have two cars, each of which has nine wheels and tires (summer, winter, and spare), plus a truck with five tires, plus tractor, snowblower, trailer, etc. And being able to just blow clean things will be handy. Next thing I'll start nagging the CFO about will be a pressure washer. I have so much mud on my tractor, which a garden hose won't do much of anything to, that it will probably require a pressure washer if I ever want to get it clean again. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/laugh.gif[/img]

    Cheers,
    Bob

  6. #6
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    856
    Location
    South West Pa/Greene county
    Tractor
    Long/Landtrac360DTC

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    Hey Boy,
    The reason they give you more than one female connector is so you can add more hose easily. Just get another length of hose, put a male connector on one end, and a female end on the other and viola, an "extension cord" for your tools. I have 3 50 ft. lengths of hose set up this way, and can add or subtract length as needed. Comes in handy for roofing as you don't have to try to lug the compressor up to the roof. Its also nice to be able to keep the extra hose hung up in the shed until it is needed, as you don't have to lug the whole length of hose around. Just make sure you have the female on the end of the hose away from the compressor, keeps the air from leaking out. You can even leave the compressor ful of air, and won't have to turn it on for small jobs like filling tires, balls, etc.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    566
    Location
    Williamson, NY (near Rochester)
    Tractor
    JD 4300 MFWD

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    <font color=blue>...I have 3 50 ft. lengths of hose set up this way, and can add or subtract length as needed.</font color=blue>

    Ahah! I hadn't even thought of what I'd do if I needed more than 50'. You can see I really planned this purchase out carefully! [img]/w3tcompact/icons/laugh.gif[/img]

    Thanks, Ed.

  8. #8
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    37,399
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    I've got 3 female quick couplers plumbed in different places in the shop, three 50' air hoses, one 15' hose, and two 10' coiled hoses, and just off hand can think of at least 14 pneumatic tools I use, and of course quick couplers on everything is the only way to go.[img]/w3tcompact/icons/laugh.gif[/img]

    You won't often wear out a coupler or have one go bad, but it does happen occasionally, so I keep 3 or 4 spares on hand, and the male air coupler that goes on the tools comes in both male and female thread types. Most tools require a male threaded end, but a few require the female threaded end on the coupler.[img]/w3tcompact/icons/frown.gif[/img]

  9. #9
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    7,991
    Location
    Shingle Springs California
    Tractor
    New Holland TC40D

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    Did the compressor come with a quick disconnect already attached? If not, one goes on the hose, for connecting the tool, and the other goes on the compressor, so you can easily disconnect the hose from the compressor.

    It is good to remove the hose when you are finished, or somehow relieve the pressure from it. I have got in a hurry, left a hose under pressure, and had it bulge and stretch(sp?) I always(almost...) disconnect and hang the hoses. Also, make sure when you do remove the hose, to attach the hose couplers so it keeps junk out of the connectors and the hose; keep it clean...

    Also, make sure you drain your tank after each use. The little petcocks they put on these things can be a real pain, but are nothing compared to having your tank rust out. Been there, done that, can you say $$$ for a new tank or compressor?

    I got this trick from my dentist; he was replacing the compressor at his office. I removed the petcock from my new compressor. In it's place, I plumbed it out to the side with 3/8" galvanized pipe, elbows ect. On the end of the pipe, I placed one of those trigger/blowers. I made sure the whole assembly was tucked in safely, where it would not get bumped. Now, when I finish doodling in the garage, I simply go to the compressor, and press the blower trigger with my toe; it protrudes from under the compressor just enough so my big big toe can get at it.


  10. #10
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    1,134
    Location
    South Carolina
    Tractor
    Kubota B7500

    Default Re: Use of compressed air tools

    What a great trick! I am geeting a little tired of getting out the tool to open the radiator type drain plug I installed.[img]/w3tcompact/icons/frown.gif[/img]

    Jeff

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