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  1. #11
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    37,728
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: Replacing the fuel filter

    <font color=blue>I have no idea how it does this but it does</font color=blue>

    Neither do I, but being the curious type, I think I'd have to look at a parts manual and see.[img]/w3tcompact/icons/laugh.gif[/img] Speculation, of course, but sounds like a float type check valve to let fuel through slowly, but not quickly.

  2. #12
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    762
    Location
    Greater Springfield area, Massachusetts
    Tractor
    Kubota B2910, also Honda HT3813 with mower and front blade.

    Default Re: Replacing the fuel filter

    It depends what the model number of your B2910 is, I think. I know the early B2710's and B2910's had a fuel shut-off. The later models, of which mine is, somehow do it automatically if the tank is less than 1/2 full. No bleeding required.[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    Now the bad news. ...

    My dealer had originally sold me the filter for the earlier series which assumes a shut-off valve. I forgot the exact price, but I think it was just a couple of bucks.

    When I went to change mine, I realized they were different, so I put my old one back on. Next trip to the dealer, I picked up the correct filter....and needed to leave an extra $10 or so! [img]/w3tcompact/icons/sad.gif[/img]

    Convenience doth have its price!

    ~Rick


  3. #13

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    83
    Location
    Ohio
    Tractor
    ford 3000,case SI..Just purchased a 404 Futon (40 hp 4wd) with a koyker FEL

    Default Re: Replacing the fuel filter

    Some 0f the newer diesels DO NOT have shut off valves..reason being that the majority of the compacts sold were being sold to 1st time users.To many problems with engine being ran while fuel was shut off.roostermaster..bosh type systems then would have to be manually bled.I believe they did incorperate a gravity float shutoff.If you have a rubber inlet hose to your filter you can gently close it with a pair of visegrips.No you should not have to bleed your system.Don`t know how many times i`ve forgotten to open the fuel valve on the old Harley...lol Hope i helped a little ...Sid

  4. #14
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    343
    Location
    Campton, NH
    Tractor
    Kubota B2910

    Default Re: Replacing the fuel filter

    Rick,
    When I did my 50hr service, I bought all the parts and had a mechanic/friend help me. Before we took apart the fuel filter we noticed that there was no way the new one would fit. So It didn't get replaced. I went back to the dealer and the same thing happened to me. The new filter cost about twice the first. The tractor is at 170 hrs now and I figure I had better change the filter.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    472
    Location
    Central NY
    Tractor
    Kubota B7500HSD

    Default Re: Replacing the fuel filter

    <font color=blue>The manual for my B7500 says that the fuel tank needs to be 1/2 full or less. When I did my 50 hour I slowly unscrewed the filter and fuel began to go everywhere so I screwed it back on. Realizing that I had to change it I just unscrewed it as quick as I could the next time and low and behold the fuel flow stops once the filter is removed completely. I have no idea how it does this but it does. First time fluid changes can sure create a mess until you figure out a good procedure. I just hope I don't forget it all for the next service interval</font color=blue>

    Jeff;

    In the top of the housing that the fuel filter screws into is some sort of spring-action fuel release. When the bowl is off, the spring device closes the fuel line and stops the fuel. As you probably discovered, when you start to screw the filter bowl back on, fuel starts to flow again, so you have to screw it in pretty quick.

    I had to drain my fuel tank once (accidently put gas in it) and the only way to drain it was to pull the fuel filter bowl off, stick a wide aluminum baking pan underneath to catch the fuel, and the use my finger to push up on this spring device to let the fuel leak out. Took about two hours; not too fun.

    I also did not realize that there had been an o ring on top of the filter, so I had a problem with it leaking after I put it all back together. Took awhile for me to figure that one out.

  6. #16
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    1,134
    Location
    South Carolina
    Tractor
    Kubota B7500

    Default Re: Replacing the fuel filter

    <font color=blue>I had to drain my fuel tank once (accidently put gas in it) and the only way to drain it was to pull the fuel filter bowl off, stick a wide aluminum baking pan underneath to catch the fuel, and the use my finger to push up on this spring device to let the fuel leak out. Took about two hours; not too fun.</font color=blue>

    DOH......2 1/2 hours!!!!! Sounds like and excellent excuse to buy one of those handy pumps.[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img] Thanks for the explanation. I do wish that the manual was more detailed in areas like this.

    Jeff

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