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  1. #1

    Default clutch adjustment on L3000

    Well I have been staring at my operators manuel trying to find where they put the access for the second adjustment on my duel clutch, I know how to adjust the clutch pedal ,but I am having trouble with the inner clutch adjustment. It is a kubota L 3000 with a duel clutch and I see an access in the loader frame ,when I pulled it off I could'nt see or feel anything in there. The manuel shows a bolt with a nut on it to set it . Help?[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

  2. #2
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    1,070
    Location
    Western Washington
    Tractor
    5300 JD 4X4

    Default Re: clutch adjustment on L3000

    If that tractor is new from the dealer to you, I wouldn't touch it. I'd have them look into it.

  3. #3

    Default Re: clutch adjustment on L3000

    No it is'nt new ,I am just trying to service it myself.[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

  4. #4
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    1,070
    Location
    Western Washington
    Tractor
    5300 JD 4X4

    Default Re: clutch adjustment on L3000

    I can sure relate to that, I do my own too. I have been following your predicament and the only thing I can think of is that throw out bearing not getting fotally released when the cluth pedal is out. Everything in there is turning at the same speed when in nuetral with the clutch out. If it squeals then it has to be the bearing. Let us know when you find what it is.

  5. #5

    Default Re: clutch adjustment on L3000

    I have not done this adjustment on a L3000, by I am pretty sure it is set up like most other Kubotas with a dual stage clutch. I don't know how many hours you have on the machine or how much you had to adjust the free play on the clutch pedal. Generally this is how it works. Setting the free play on the clutch pedal sets the space between the clutch engagement "fingers" and the release bearing (throw out bearing). The second adjustment is basically for when and how much the PTO clutch disengages. For the most part, this adjustment depends on how much wear you have in the PTO clutch disc , usually the PTO disc does not wear anywhere near as fast as the drive clutch. An easy way to check for proper clutch operation is to observe the PTO while pushing in the clutch. Half way down the trans should disengage completely. Pushing the clutch the rest of the way down will disengage the PTO. If, when the clutch pedal is full down and the PTO does not fully disengage then the "secondary" clutch adjustment is required. There are 4 bolts with jam nuts located at 90 degrees from each other in the mid part of the clutch assy. When the clutch is depressed, initially the pressure plate for the drive clutch is moved aft from the flywheel and allows the main clutch disc to disengage. The main clutch pressure plate is what these adjusting or "striker bolts" are fixed to. There is about a .040 space (can't remember the exact #) between these bolt heads and the PTO pressure plate. As the clutch is fully depressed the main pressure plate moves aft and contacts the PTO plate which in turn moves that aft and disengages the PTO clutch disc. So in time as the main disc wears it moves further away from the PTO plate and this is why these bolts will eventually need to be adjusted. Now, USUALLY, you have to remove the right loader frame support assy completely from the tractor. Then remove the cover plate from the clutch housing. It's not alot of space to work with but you need to turn the engine over till one of these adjustment bolts comes in to view. You can use a heavy screwdriver or small pry bar to leverage the clutch assy and flywheel through the access hole to turn the engine over (assure the fuel is manually shutoff for saftey). Once you see the first adjustment bolt come into view mark it with white paint marker or something in case you lose count during the adjustment of all four bolts. Loosen the jam nut and turn the bolt aft till it contacts the PTO pressure plate, then back it back out one and a half to two full turns and re-tighten the jam nut (I'd be suprised if your operators manual goes into this much detail and therefore I would recommend purchasing the service manual to make sure my numbers are correct for your model). Do this with all four adjusting bolts and the PTO clutch adjustment is complete. Hope that all made some sense to you..............

  6. #6

    Default Re: clutch adjustment on L3000

    rdbrumfield, I was'nt having any problems , I was just doing the service check, thanks. Kubmech, perfectly what I was looking for, I did'nt realize it was that indepth but it is what I was doing. I have 100 hrs. on the tractor and I've only used the PTO once, so I will not worry so much now. Another question-I have one loose connector underneith the fender of each side, do you know if these are for hooking up extra lights? I do appritiate all your help and I always look forward to your posts because you really seem to know these tractors.[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img] My dad has taught me something very valuable and it is this- always talk to the mechanic about machinery- not the salesman so here goes, if longevity were the issue on a tractor would you rather have a gear or hydrostat ? Thanks

  7. #7
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    1,070
    Location
    Western Washington
    Tractor
    5300 JD 4X4

    Default Re: clutch adjustment on L3000

    As far as the connections on either side, check for voltage with a mulitimeter with the light switch on and off.
    I can't be objective with the tranny question. I have used hydrostats some and they are really nice in the midsize dozers. I haven't used them much in the small tractors. Being able to just creep along while tilling is a nice advantage with hydo. If you are doing a lot of close work I can see where it would be helpful. I suppose when it comes down to it, just depends on prefference.

  8. #8

    Default Re: clutch adjustment on L3000

    Putty, if you only have 100 hours don't even worry about that secondary adjustment. As far as the extra leads under the fenders, I think you will find that they are hot as long as the key switch is in the on position and if you hook them, or it up to your tail light/s they will stay on the whole time the tractor is running. I never bothered to find out the exact reason for this, but assume it is for saftey reasons, possibly in another country, that the tail lights would need to be on full time, kind of like daytime running lights. But that's just a theory. As far as Hydro VS gear? It has been my experience that it seems to lie entirely with the owner/operator which will last longer or be better for that persons application. With good maintenance, the HST will last a long time, the gear models, depending entirely on what system they use; there is, shuttle shift, synch and non-synch, blah, blah, blah. As a general rule, straight cut, non shuttle transmissions tend to last forever, models, partial or fully synched can develop problems before a straight gear tractor. HST's can be abused a little easier during regular hard use or due to lack of proper maintenance. I think people who use HST need to understand there sytem a little better than if they were using straight gear, as well as guys who have synchro (esp. shuttle shift) need to understand the limitations of each of these systems. If you have an operator/owner that understands his/her system and operates it within it's limitations then all is a wash and the "contest" between the systems is pretty much irrelevant. HST may use a little more available HP to operate, however the ease in which it operates tends to nulify the HP advantage of a gear model. All of which should be considered upon initial purchase of what ever it is you need, to do the jobs, you intend to do with that machine. So I think, to answer your question, your gear model will probably outlast an HST model as a general rule. Assuming you pay attention to operation and maintenance practices that would be conducive to both systems, but you will, without a doubt, have to work more using your tractor VS an HST and most likely have more clutch related problems than an HST. All this VS HST could still even out in the end depending on the wear and tear. I believe it is 6 of one 1/2 dozen of the other over the life of either. Ther really is no "hard" answer to this queastion and really depends on the owners "big picture" of tractor ownership.

  9. #9

    Default Re: clutch adjustment on L3000

    Kubmech , great answer to a tough question. I appritiate all your answers , keeping care of my equipment is enjoyable to me , this tractor stuff has become a hobby to me that is replacing a lot of bad hobbies in the past and I enjoy it much. Thanks[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

  10. #10

    Default Re: clutch adjustment on L3000

    I know what you mean Putty, I could stand to replace a few "hobbies" myself. Thanks.....

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