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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    65
    Location
    Gate City, VA.

    Default REBUILD QUESTION

    I posted this in the mitsubishi forum and got no replies( guess they're all frozen up going to be 0 degrees here tonight).

    I'm getting ready to rebuild my SATOH S630 and looking for feedback on rebuilt crankshafts. the engine has 1800 hrs on it and ran fine with no oil burning. I it developed a knock and I discovered It had a spun rod bearing. My in block measurements show to be just beyond the .040 limit. Standard Crankshaft in NC. has made me a good price to rebuild it bach to standard specs. Any opinions?

    Thanks Rick

  2. #2
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    6,737
    Tractor
    JD 8320 MFWD, JD 6415 MFWD, FEL, and cab, John Deere MFWD 4600, John Deere 4020, John Deere 4430, John Deere 455 mower, Deutz, and Gehl 4610 perkins skidsteer

    Default Re: REBUILD QUESTION

    In my experience a rebuilt crank is about as good as the person doing the rebuilding. Personally I like to buy new. If you're going to go the problem of doing it I sure as heck don't want to have to tear it down and redo it. It's kind of like insurance. Do you want to take the chance and not pay the extra or do you want to be 100% safe and go new.

  3. #3
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    1,055
    Location
    WVa
    Tractor
    Kubota L3710, Ford 5600, Case MB4/94, Kubota B6200

    Default Re: REBUILD QUESTION

    I've heard some horror stories about crankshaft work. As long as you KNOW FOR SURE the shop's reputation, it should be fine.

    Try Carolina Crank in Charlotte, NC @ (704) 372-1037. One of the local used tractor and repair places recommends them. That's not to say Standard Crankshaft isn't good too.

    The local guy does a lot of tractor repair and if there's any question at all he sends the crank to them. He's never had a problem. They can also buildup the journals of a crank that's too small. They've worked on cranks that the local shop wouldn't touch.


  4. #4
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    37,779
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: REBUILD QUESTION

    I agree with the other two guys. I'd generally be afraid of a rebuilt crankshaft; however, I do know of one shop whose work I'd trust anytime to do that kind of job. Just depends on who does it and how good they are.

  5. #5
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    3,512

    Default Re: REBUILD QUESTION

    I have never had any personal experience with rebuilt crankshafts, but aren't the journals just welded up to oversize and then machined down to specs? What goes wrong when you get a bad job? It would seem that if a machine shop has the equipment to do the job, it should be a no-brainer.

  6. #6
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    1,055
    Location
    WVa
    Tractor
    Kubota L3710, Ford 5600, Case MB4/94, Kubota B6200

    Default Re: REBUILD QUESTION

    There's usually bearings available to fit the journals after they're machined and polished down to a minimum diameter. Below that the journal diameter can be increased through a welding process IF the shop has the equipment and then machined and polished .

    The first step is to check the crank for cracks. If the crank is cracked, it's usually scrap. That may be a judgement call at times. The local dealer went through three cranks trying to find one that could be used to rebuild a tractor engine. Each time the local auto machine shop said the crank was cranked and wouldn't work on it.

    The dealer finally sent the third crank to Carolina Crank. The tractor has been running for several years now with no problems.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    65
    Location
    Gate City, VA.

    Default Re: REBUILD QUESTION

    The idea of new was good but (no longer available). The local machine shop recomended STANDARD. They said there was a special hardening process they were unable to do. Standard gives a 6mo. warranty. I located a used one but it had to be turned. They informed me they do cranks up to 12ft in length for construction equipment. Just thought someone might have experienced this.

  8. #8
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    220
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Tractor
    3130HST, Ferguson TO35

    Default Re: REBUILD QUESTION

    I would rather have a used crankshaft that hopefully could be turned to .010 or .020 than a welded up crank turned back to standard. Whenever we did that in a semi, it would always seem to break. Six months is no warranty for the amount of money invested in the rebuild. There warranty is probably only to give you another carnkshaft and nothing else.

  9. #9
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    417
    Location
    s.c.
    Tractor
    Mitsu D1550 Farmall super A

    Default Re: REBUILD QUESTION

    I have bought and used many cranks from Standard,never had any problems,these were auto cranks but I built some pretty high output engines with them

    just my 2cents

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    873
    Location
    N Central Ohio
    Tractor
    NH TC35D/SUPER H&M/F-20/JD B&D/FORDSON/JD250 SSL

    Default Re: REBUILD QUESTION

    When they 'build up' journals they use a spray weld
    set-up and since u are only adding .020" (thickness
    of 5 sheets of copy paper) w/o proper adhesion it
    will peal like chrome.
    Then u get to do it again.
    But we have a local shop that has done some for
    odd equipment that we can't find replacement and they
    are still running.
    Like others said some shops are good and others ???????

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