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  1. #11

    Default Re: Long Term Battery Storage

    Most small batterys die from Sulfration of the plates, or dehydration.
    Many large batterys die from the same effects.
    A fully charged battery will not freeze to under 20 below 0.
    The best thing to do with a battery in any machine is to disconnect it. A connected battery is subject to parasitic draw and over time that will kill the battery and render it subject to freezing.
    FIRE is always a possibility when a battery is connected.
    Battery switches are cheap insurance against loss of a machine and the building it is stored in.
    Trickle chargers are a nice idea, but they dehydrate the battery over time, and unless acid level is maintained, the charger will cook the battery dry, and it cannot be restored by adding water.
    Finally, batterys should always be refilled with distilled water. Even minor mineral content in tap water will considerably shorten battery life.

  2. #12

    Default Re: Long Term Battery Storage

    (PS. If you take the battery out of the tractor, don't store it on concrete, if you have to put it on the floor set it up on a plank or a piece of non conductive material.)

    May I ask why? [img]/forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif[/img]

  3. #13

    Default Re: Long Term Battery Storage

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( (PS. If you take the battery out of the tractor, don't store it on concrete, if you have to put it on the floor set it up on a plank or a piece of non conductive material.)

    May I ask why? )</font>

    This is an old bromide. It probably originated years ago when battery technology was way behind where it is now.

    The colder a battery is, the lower its output. Couple a weak battery with a cold concrete floor in winter, compared to a weak battery stored off of the concrete floor, and there probably is a (very) slight difference in output.

    Someone probably noticed and advised storing batteries up off of the floor at some time. No doubt, the rumor mill turned this into, "concrete floors discharge batteries," which of course, they don't.

    It's in the same league with the "suppressed" 100 mpg carbureator story.

    SnowRidge



  4. #14

    Default Re: Long Term Battery Storage

    (This is an old bromide.)


    I knew that, only I would have said it was an Old Wives Tale.

  5. #15

    Default Re: Long Term Battery Storage

    Actually, Bromo doesn't effect batterys near as much as Alka Seltzer.
    The reason batterys were not stored on concrete floors dates back to the time before plastic battery cases. Old batterys had hard rubber cases that were porous or capilary in nature, and the acid did migrate thru the case and react with the concrete.
    Plastic cases have eliminated that problem, but only when they are clean.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    247
    Location
    mid- Maine
    Tractor
    Century 3045

    Default Re: Long Term Battery Storage

    I store about six batteries in the winter. I hook them all up together + to + and - to - then use an electronic Sears battery charger (about $80) . It has a "maintainer" switch that trickles in any amp setting you want up to 20. I keep mine on all winter and they are fine in the spring. This year I put a new battery in the yard truck and had no problem all winter. An old battery will not maintain charge like that. Last year i needed to keep the battery on a separate charger as mentioned in previous posts. Worked fine, trouble is it was a pain to open the hood (because of snow and ice) to disconnect it in order to use the truck.
    Pacesetter

  7. #17
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    37,442
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: Long Term Battery Storage

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( May I ask why? )</font>

    All good answers, I think. I like Franz's answer best, and I'm old enough that I still would never leave a battery on concrete; might not actually be clean enough on the bottom, and I see no reason to take a chance on getting any acid on the concrete when an old board would have absorbed it. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

  8. #18

    Default Re: Long Term Battery Storage

    The problem with battery chargers that have trickle mode is that they will still boil out the electrolyte. This dramatically shortens battery life. Sulphation is another issue. I have been using BatteryMINDer's for approximately 18 months without any boiling out problems. The manufacture still recommends checking the electrolyte level every week or two. If your battery is discharged, then it's quicker to use a standard charger to get the charge up and then use BatteryMINDer to finish charging and for maintenance. If your battery is on its last leg, no battery charger or BatteryMINDer can help save it. Batterymart.com has BatteryMINDer for $39.95. BatteryMINDer

  9. #19
    Elite Member thcri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    4,648
    Location
    Minnesota SE
    Tractor
    New Holland TC29D, 2001

    Default Re: Long Term Battery Storage

    Henry,

    What I do with my boat every season is to take the battery out, and sometimes I do leave it in but I do disconnect one of the poles so that nothing can drain on the battery. I do once a month put a trickle charger on it to bring it back up to life. If you take it out, DON'T set it on concrete. Place it on a board. As far as leaving a trickle charger on it all the time is not good. I was also once told that if you put a charger on it make sure you disconnect it from the battery when not charging. If you leave the charger cables on and turned off some chargers will drain your battery.

    There is a thing out there called battery minder, it is in one of the other posts and that probably is the best thing.

    murph

  10. #20
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    47,883
    Location
    Central florida
    Tractor
    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: Long Term Battery Storage

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( If you leave the charger cables on and turned off some chargers will drain your battery.
    )</font>

    Most modern battery chargers use either an epoxy rectifier, or silicon/ germanium diodes for their bridges.. ( probably mostly silicon ). At battery voltages.. youre not going to get measurable quiescent reverse current flow.

    I have worked on some vintage battery chargers.. these may have benn 50's or 60's vintage... maybee 40's.. but I doubt it.. they used selenium rectifiers.. those were a bit leaky... but anything with a modern solid state output should be fine.. if it is working correctly.... Same idea as the diode pack in an alternator.. prevents reverse current flow unless your diodes short...

    Soundguy

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