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  1. #11
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    572
    Location
    Jackson County, Michigan
    Tractor
    Bolens HT-20

    Default Re: Overloaded loaded tires.

    A couple decades ago I had the rears filled with the chloride. Tubes were installed to insulate rim metal from it's corrosiveness. One tire blew about two years ago from dry rot. It was a chore to get anything to grow where it let loose. Will never put chloride in again. I now run windshield washer fluid with the antifreeze in it. Filled them to stem level. I do notice the drag of added weight when going up hill. (At least I'm blaming the weight in the tires on that!)

  2. #12
    Veteran Member Rowski's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Posts
    1,478
    Location
    North Central Vermont, Jay Peak Area
    Tractor
    2004 New Holland TN70DA with 32LC loader, 2000 New Holland 2120 with Curtis cab, 7309 loader

    Default Re: Overloaded loaded tires.

    It was more like Hmmm....for me.

    Don't know, you'd have to ask him.

  3. #13
    Elite Member hazmat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    4,028
    Location
    West Newbury, MA & Harrison, ME
    Tractor
    Kubota L5460HSTC

    Default Re: Overloaded loaded tires.

    <font color="blue">...a slight increase in HP due less rotational mass...

    Huh????

    What does that mean...? </font>

    It means you can spin the tire up faster because it has less inertia. -- Ie it takes less HP to accelerate the tire. Once you are at cruising speed, you don't get any "extra" HP. Actaully once you are at speed, It will take more to stop the heavier tire which is probably an advantage on a tractor.

    Rotational mass is something to worry about on a drag racing car, not a tractor.

  4. #14
    Veteran Member Rowski's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Posts
    1,478
    Location
    North Central Vermont, Jay Peak Area
    Tractor
    2004 New Holland TN70DA with 32LC loader, 2000 New Holland 2120 with Curtis cab, 7309 loader

    Default Re: Overloaded loaded tires.

    Ok, Here's the scoop. I decided I'm going to try to do it all my self. I bought a drill pump from Napa to unload and load the tires. The drill is cheap around $10, so if I burn one or two up it not to bad. Bougnt some fittings and bushings to fit the drill pump for around $7. Also bought a couple of tire irons for removing and installing the tire from the wheel. These were a bit pricey at $50 each, but worked very well. I had a slide hammer bead breaker at work already. It took about almost 2 hours to unload the tires with the Cal. chl. and remove the tire from the rim, I sand blasted the rusty part of the rim and primed it. All I need now is my Rim Guard and new tubes. Assemble the wheel, tire, tube an load with RG. Then I have to do the other side.

    Any advise on loading the tires? I'll only give it 75% fill which is recommended. That would be with the valve stem at 12:00. Once I startputting the fluid in, I would need to stop every so often and let some air out, right? Becasue the fluid is displacing the air which builds pressure?

    I have pictures of the rusty rim. I'll post after my project gets done.

    What a PITA this calcium chloride is [img]/forums/images/graemlins/crazy.gif[/img]. I really hate it [img]/forums/images/graemlins/mad.gif[/img]! My skin is all itchy, tools rust up quickly. I'll be glad when I've got Rim Guard on both wheels.

  5. #15
    Veteran Member Rowski's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Posts
    1,478
    Location
    North Central Vermont, Jay Peak Area
    Tractor
    2004 New Holland TN70DA with 32LC loader, 2000 New Holland 2120 with Curtis cab, 7309 loader

    Default Re: Overloaded loaded tires.

    I taked to an engineer at Firestone Ag division about loading tires. He recommends a 75% fill. You can go higher but you need to leave some air space in the tire for tire flexing. Especially if you hit rocks or stumps. He said if tire can't flex when stricking objects even at slow speeds tire damage can ooccur. Having a tire loaded with only small amounts of liquid and result in sloshing. He said it is very noticeable at speed and can cause hopping and a surge like feeling.

    He also told me that a 4 ply tire which is on my tractor is not the proper rating, too weak. I wish he hadn't told me that [img]/forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif[/img].

  6. #16

    Default Re: Overloaded loaded tires.

    Hi,

    I did read this thread but if it was mentioned I forgot. How much does the rimguard stuff cost?

    I filled my rear tires with WW fluid at about 60 cents per gallon. I'm not sure if Rimguard would be worth much more than about a dollar a gallon to me.

    Just curious...

  7. #17
    Veteran Member Rowski's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Posts
    1,478
    Location
    North Central Vermont, Jay Peak Area
    Tractor
    2004 New Holland TN70DA with 32LC loader, 2000 New Holland 2120 with Curtis cab, 7309 loader

    Default Re: Overloaded loaded tires.

    Finally got my overloaded loaded tire problems solved [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img].

    My tires originally had about 7o gallons of calcium chloride a piece in them. That is a guess as I had 2 55 gallon barrels full and a 3rd about 1/2 full. Now I have 45 gallons of Rim Guard in each. The tractor rides a lot better on the road. Had at top speed with the 1200 lbs Harley rake on it. Ran much smoother actually seemed like I had more power in my highest gear going up hill, my rpms didn't drop as much as it used to.

    In all I'm happy I did what I did, knowing my rims are safe from future rusting.

    Now I can use the T-8 Harley rake and Woods BB720 rotary cutter [img]/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif[/img]!

    Thanks for all the help and advise.

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