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  1. #1
    Veteran Member Rowski's Avatar
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    North Central Vermont, Jay Peak Area
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    2004 New Holland TN70DA with 32LC loader, 2000 New Holland 2120 with Curtis cab, 7309 loader

    Default Overloaded loaded tires.

    I went to check my loaded rear tires tonight for air pressure. This is actually the first time checking the rears, I have checked my fronts quite a bit. Anyways... I got into a can of worms. I positioned the valve stems on the top. Pushed in the valve stem core to let the small amount of chloride out before checking the air pressure, but it kept coming out. Not a very fast, a very small stream. So I put the valve cap back on. Went to to the other side and samething happend [img]/forums/images/graemlins/mad.gif[/img]. So I put the caps back on tight and check for leaks at the caps. Seemed not to be leaking. I need to fix this becasue caps aren't ment to keep the air and chloride in.

    Questions:

    Aren't tires only supposed to be loaded about 2/3 of the tire?

    If so, could I put the valves at about 2/3, and remove the valve stem core and let the cloride run out till it reaches that level? I would jack the rear of the tractor up and wash down the chlordie in good shape with water?

    Should I get new valve stem cores? These were letting chloride leak by after I pushed the core down to check the tire pressure.

    Thanks

  2. #2

    Default Re: Overloaded loaded tires.

    You are supposed to support the weight of the machine on a jack when you check a loaded tire for air pressure.
    With the machine sitting on the tire, fluid will ba above the valve stem. The tires weren't loaded with the machine sitting on them.

  3. #3
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Mar 2000
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    Texas

    Default Re: Overloaded loaded tires.

    Derek, like you and Franz said, first step is to take the weight off the tire with a jack. Then you can pull the valve core to let any excess fluid out (if there actually is any excess). I think you can safely go as high as 80% which is about what you'd have with the valve stems at the top or 12 o'clock position. If you want a little less, you can turn the wheel from the 12 o'clock position to whatever level you want. </font><font color="blue" class="small">( Should I get new valve stem cores? )</font> Yes, if they leak, but they may not if you remove them and wash them in clean water while holding them open. However, they're cheap and new ones certainly wouldn't hurt anything.

  4. #4
    Veteran Member Rowski's Avatar
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    North Central Vermont, Jay Peak Area
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    2004 New Holland TN70DA with 32LC loader, 2000 New Holland 2120 with Curtis cab, 7309 loader

    Default Re: Overloaded loaded tires.

    Oh boy... Ran it to big trouble this afternoon [img]/forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif[/img]. Wanted to let some of the liguid out of the rear tires and the valve stem broke just at the bottom of the external threads for the valve cap. Liquid leaking everywhere. Plus I have a brand new T-8 Harley rake and a brand new Woods BB720 cutter just waiting to be used! My rims are rusting where the valve hole in the rim is. About now I've had it with Calcium chloride. I am very seriously considering not using calcium chloride. My dealer (which I was very unhappy with before this) over filled the tires by way to much, I'm guessing like 95%. I removed 15 gallons on one side today and the stuff was still coming out before the valve broke. I'm thinking of adding external weights or using the rim guard. Sorry for the rambling... I have flames in my eyes and smoke rolling out my ears!

    I do have a few more questions:

    Where can I find some info (on-line) about rim guard? I found (searching TBN) a phone number from a guy who created rim guard. Is there anything else does anybody have rim guard in the New England area?

    About how much are external weight? Ball park figure. How much of this external weight can you put on equal to the liquid?

    Any other ideas?


    Thanks for the help!

  5. #5
    Platinum Member dourobob's Avatar
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    Mar 2002
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    Just West of Buckhorn, Ontario, Canada
    Tractor
    Wheel Horse 522xi

    Default Re: Overloaded loaded tires.

    I feel for you - I have a marginal valve stem on a loaded tire and I will need to have it replaced soon. I had another string discussing tire loading earlier - some good advice there including a link to a Rim Guard Reference. From an earlier post by HAZ <font color="blue"> The guy who holds the patent on it is Glen Daly, in East Lansing, Michigan. If you give him a call at 517-351-6470 he'll send you info on it and tell you where the dealers are in your area </font>.

    I spoke to Glen a couple of weeks ago and he said he hopes to have a web site up soon (haven't seen it yet) and he doesn't have any dealers in Canada but he may have someone in your area. Nice guy and very helpful - probably worth the phone call.

    good luck
    Bob

  6. #6
    Super Member RickB's Avatar
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    Sep 2000
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    Eastern NY
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    Case 885, Ford 4000

    Default Re: Overloaded loaded tires.

    Rim Guard weighs 11 lbs/gal. We have installed it exclusively for about 2 years; probably well over 100 tractors. We are not close to you, but located in northeast Dutchess County, NY. About 12 miles from the junction of MA, CT and NY. Send me a PM if I can help more.

  7. #7
    Veteran Member Rowski's Avatar
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    North Central Vermont, Jay Peak Area
    Tractor
    2004 New Holland TN70DA with 32LC loader, 2000 New Holland 2120 with Curtis cab, 7309 loader

    Default Re: Overloaded loaded tires.

    What is the proper amount of liquid ballast for rear tires? I've gotten answers from 90% to as little as 30%. A gentleman I talked to day(who was the 30%) says you will have better traction with less liquid ballast (in the 30% range). He said a tire loaded over 75% will less traction than an unloaded tire. He also mention the footprint of the tire would be lighter, less hoping while traveling on the road, and a slight increase in HP due less rotational mass. He felt it was better to add external weight as needed, like bolt on weights or adding attachments (or ballast boxes). He claimed that this way you can tread lighter, less compaction and good traction. Then add the weight when needed.


    What do you think....?? Opinions....??

  8. #8
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Texas

    Default Re: Overloaded loaded tires.

    Derek, I filled my tires with water and antifreeze to the presumed 75% level; had the valve stem at the top (12 o'clock) with the wheels lifted just off the ground and filled them to the point that the liquid ran back out. Now theories about liquid sloshing around, tires hopping, etc. sound pretty good to me, but I tried everything I could think of; fast starts and stops, full speed (which admittedly was only 11.9 mph on a B2710), smooth roads, rough roads and I can tell you the operator would have never known the liquid was there; drove just like it did without liquid. Of course, it did hold the back end down better when I was using the FEL, but otherwise I found no difference. And I used a neighbor's Oliver 1755 quite a bit, he had bought it used of course, and neither of us knew the rear tires were loaded with calcium until he punctured one. That's been my experience; maybe others have had different experiences.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Overloaded loaded tires.

    The formula I always heard was to fill to the top of the rim just below the valve stem (I guess around 75%???). I checked just now and the bx manual also describes the same values on pg. 37. 30% fill on a bx tire wouldn't amount to enough weight to be worth it IMHO.

    The dealer I bought from loads the tires on all bx's w/ fels that they sell. They use w/w antifreeze and I guess their intent was to make sure the machine was as stable as possible without external weight. But I doubt that there would be much difference using wheel weights or a weight box if it was low enough. Just don't combine wheel weights and filled tires or per kubota tranny damage could occur.
    Just my .02.
    DaveL

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jan 2001
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    2,518
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    Capital District, Upstate New York
    Tractor
    Satoh S650G, MF135, MF165, JD5205

    Default Re: Overloaded loaded tires.

    <font color="blue">...a slight increase in HP due less rotational mass... </font>

    Huh????

    What does that mean...? [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif[/img]

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