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  1. #11
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    Default Re: Wax and Grease Remover

    It looks like you have done your homework. Perhaps you could make your own, but I am not a chemist and I really have no idea what the results would be. Shipped to your door, I believe the stuff I use is $24 per gallon. When improper paint prep could ruin an entire paint job, and problems might not start to apperar until after much time and cost has been spent, it is just not worth it in my opinion to experiment with such things.

    One thing that I will add is that the waterborne wax and grease remove does get the surface cleaner than solvent based. However, solvent based is far superior for removing adhesives (masking tape, pin stripes, etc.). Ideally, you would use the solvent based first, and then the waterborne. You will notice everything the solvent based missed on your rag after using the waterborne. Also, solvent based cleaners cannot be used on many plastic bumpers. Waterborne is much safer on plastics.

  2. #12
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    Default Re: Wax and Grease Remover

    Quote Originally Posted by strum456 View Post
    It looks like you have done your homework. Perhaps you could make your own, but I am not a chemist and I really have no idea what the results would be. Shipped to your door, I believe the stuff I use is $24 per gallon. When improper paint prep could ruin an entire paint job, and problems might not start to apperar until after much time and cost has been spent, it is just not worth it in my opinion to experiment with such things.
    Last night, shortly after creating this thread, I managed to locate an online supplier that was very reasonable on their shipping rates so I ordered a gallon of Klean Strip Prep-All. I've used it for years and know it's good stuff. I waited to mention it because I wanted to see what people suggested.

    After having restored many cars in the last 30 years, I know my way around a spray gun, and agree that good prep isn't something to mess around with. Like you, I'm no chemist, which is why I turned to existing formulas for guidance, because chemical interactions can be dangerous and unpredictable.

    However, I was thinking it might be interesting to experiment a little and see what I could come up with, because it's always nice to have alternate low-cost sources for supplies. It's also nice to know how to make your own, just in case the company who makes it goes out of business or local suppliers stop carrying it. Any experimentation would be done on "test" pieces so no harm would be done if the "recipe" didn't turn out quite right.
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  3. #13
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    Default Re: Wax and Grease Remover

    Quote Originally Posted by strum456 View Post
    It looks like you have done your homework. Perhaps you could make your own, but I am not a chemist and I really have no idea what the results would be. Shipped to your door, I believe the stuff I use is $24 per gallon. When improper paint prep could ruin an entire paint job, and problems might not start to apperar until after much time and cost has been spent, it is just not worth it in my opinion to experiment with such things.

    One thing that I will add is that the waterborne wax and grease remove does get the surface cleaner than solvent based. However, solvent based is far superior for removing adhesives (masking tape, pin stripes, etc.). Ideally, you would use the solvent based first, and then the waterborne. You will notice everything the solvent based missed on your rag after using the waterborne. Also, solvent based cleaners cannot be used on many plastic bumpers. Waterborne is much safer on plastics.
    I am not a chemist for sure...though I did use acetone to clean my glassware in my organic chemistry classes. On plastics I tend to use 90% isopropyl alcohol. I may test a paint with acetone to see if it is an alkyd paint sometimes, but in general, if I am cleaning a painted surface in advance of repainting, I tend to stay clear of acetone and use the alcohol instead. A buddy who is a materials engineer and head of technical in a finishing company says that acetone will mess up alkyd paint, and even if the new paint is not an alkyd, the underlying paint is a poor substrate if it is an alkyd that was acetone washed. He said that is a mess, and he'd slap me if he caught me doing that.

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Wax and Grease Remover

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Fowler View Post
    Acetone is the best cleaner but it is flammable and it will eat up many plastics and you will need some good chemical gloves to wear when applying it. Also need pure cotton rags to apply it with as lots of the polyesters seem to dissolve.
    Quote Originally Posted by EE_Bota View Post
    I am not a chemist for sure...though I did use acetone to clean my glassware in my organic chemistry classes. On plastics I tend to use 90% isopropyl alcohol. I may test a paint with acetone to see if it is an alkyd paint sometimes, but in general, if I am cleaning a painted surface in advance of repainting, I tend to stay clear of acetone and use the alcohol instead. A buddy who is a materials engineer and head of technical in a finishing company says that acetone will mess up alkyd paint, and even if the new paint is not an alkyd, the underlying paint is a poor substrate if it is an alkyd that was acetone washed. He said that is a mess, and he'd slap me if he caught me doing that.
    My understanding is that acetone is a great degreaser, but because it's harmful to many paints and most plastics, it's generally not a good idea to use it in certain applications like tractor restorations.

    Acetone - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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  5. #15
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    Default Re: Wax and Grease Remover

    Quote Originally Posted by MasseyWV View Post
    My understanding is that acetone is a great degreaser, but because it's harmful to many paints and most plastics, it's generally not a good idea to use it in certain applications like tractor restorations.

    Acetone - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    In the second paragraph, it was said to be used as a paint thinner. I doubt seriously that can be taken as a blanket statement to mean it is a great thinner for all paints. It is cheap as dirt, for sale everywhere, and it and isopropyl alcohol has suited my needs so far.
    But frequently, though I use it for bare metal, many times blasted metal can be blown off with dry air, and painted immediately.

    I have prepared some things with Dawn liquid and water. But some metals start the rusting process immediately at the micro level, and some folks think it is important to keep water away from metal before painting. A tack cloth can be use for dust removal instead of washing...it all depends on what a man wants, what he needs, and what he has I suppose.

    I like acetone because it is a great solvent, with a hydrophobic and a hydrophilic end, so it shares that aspect with "soap" (but does not form micelle body per se), but definitely is broad from the "like solvates like" perspective, and evaporates when done. That is pretty close to perfect in my book for my uses. Folks should take it or leave it, but it is too handy not to be in my arsenal.

  6. #16
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    Default Re: Wax and Grease Remover

    Quote Originally Posted by EE_Bota View Post
    I like acetone because it is a great solvent, with a hydrophobic and a hydrophilic end, so it shares that aspect with "soap" (but does not form micelle body per se), but definitely is broad from the "like solvates like" perspective, and evaporates when done. That is pretty close to perfect in my book for my uses. Folks should take it or leave it, but it is too handy not to be in my arsenal.
    Like you, I also use acetone for many things, I just avoid using it during any part of a restoration because of it's potential for harming paints and plastics.
    .

  7. #17
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    Default Re: Wax and Grease Remover

    Thanks MasseyWV
    Thats some great info
    It also needs to be mentioned that just because something says "Waterborne"
    doesn't mean its 100% safe.

  8. #18
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    Default Re: Wax and Grease Remover

    Quote Originally Posted by Just Bill View Post
    Thanks MasseyWV
    Thats some great info
    It also needs to be mentioned that just because something says "Waterborne"
    doesn't mean its 100% safe.
    You're welcome and I agree. In fact, some of the most toxic substances on Earth happen to be water soluble.
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